Polygon's Scores

  • Games
For 840 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 Diablo III
Lowest review score: 10 Steel Battalion: Heavy Armor
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 51 out of 840
995 game reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 55 Critic Score
    With little actual challenge to speak of, Ever Oasis doesn't have much going for it. There aren't any tricky enemies to ward off, and the town-building simulation is shallow. It's the combination of several other genres whose best games are far, far, far more worth playing than this one. In its attempt to crib from the best, Ever Oasis never establishes its own identity.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 45 Critic Score
    The true misery of Valkyria Revolution is how much of the series’ roots show through, and how much Revolution itself doesn’t know what to do with them. The qualities that defined earlier Valkyria games are mostly vestigial, but Revolution doesn't present anything strong enough or distinct enough to replace them. What it does do often directly conflicts with those legacy bulletpoints, making a game that feels like a bland timesink at its best and a fractured mess at its worst.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Tekken 7 is a sweet reward for anyone who’s been following along for more than two decades, but it could do a lot more to onboard new fans — especially considering the uneven story and lack of a strong tutorial. Still, if you want to spend the time (and look for help on YouTube), Tekken 7’s unforgettable characters and fluid fights are worth the work.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    I've never been more charmed by a racing video game and I could not recommend any other more than Dirt 4, to anyone of any ability. Dirt 4 is a joy.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Monument Valley 2 successfully replicates the original's charm and vibrancy. Its sense of how a touch game can transport minds to unfamiliar terrains is uncanny. Certainly, it's one of the most accomplished low-intensity mobile puzzle games ever made. Frustratingly, it falls away just at the point when it might have scaled greater heights.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    This is another way in which Conarium stays profoundly true to the works of Lovecraft, a writer whose best stories were rarely more than 15 or 20 pages long. It left me wanting more, for better and worse. It left my mind racing with the reality-shattering implications of this universe’s dark lore. But I finished Conarium wishing it would have pushed a little deeper, a little further and with a little more quality, even as the most solid attempt at bringing Lovecraft to video games done so far.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Arms exudes a level of creativity and mechanical sophistication that feels uniquely Nintendo. It evokes memories of classic Nintendo games like Punch-Out!!, while also feeling equally fashionable and modern — and set next to Splatoon, suggests the publisher is already charting a path toward the future. With a stylish, memorable cast of characters, inventive gameplay mechanics and smart use of the Switch hardware, Arms already feels like Nintendo's next great new franchise.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Friday the 13th: The Game manages to mimic the surface level of the movies well enough — their kills, their locations, their gore — but it doesn’t come close to mirroring the campy spirit of the films. The result is a joyless cycle of murder broken up by long stretches of boredom.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    The Fidelio Incident makes an admirable attempt to approach a difficult subject from a unique angle. But it fails to capture the emotional subtlety or artful storytelling that games like Gone Home, Firewatch and Virginia have demonstrated within the same kind of framework.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 55 Critic Score
    The Long Journey Home may hold many secrets and wonders, but it's hard to hold on to the promise of them when the game's more likely to break both your legs as soon as you step off the front porch. The promise of a truly narrative-driven roguelike is tantalizing, but this isn’t that game. It's just as tied to your skill with the controller as any bullet hell — more so, really, because you carry the consequences of even the slightest mistake a long ways before finally seeing the game over screen. It promises to be a game about the wonder of unbound space; instead, it’s more about the infuriating heartbreak of high wind speeds in a low gravity environment.
    • 75 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Despite its grand vistas, Star Trek: Bridge Crew comes across more like a simple mobile game than a full virtual reality simulation of space combat and exploration. [Early Impressions - 5/29/17]
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While Samurai Warriors: Spirit of Sanada doesn’t diverge wildly from what I’ve come to expect, its presentation and impact are unique enough, strong enough and successful enough that I can only hope it heralds a new direction for the franchise. Deeply personal stories about these monumental figures, given ample room to breathe, can bring an overtold legend back to life.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    If you'd told me 20 or even 10 years ago that we'd get a better-than-arcade port of one of Street Fighter's best entries that's playable on a portable, I'd have been thrilled. But we've come to expect a lot more from fighting games these days, ironically by Capcom itself, and Ultra Street Fighter 2 just doesn't do enough to justify its price tag or overshadow its shortcomings.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    Perception is full of interesting ideas, both mechanically and narratively, but it never fully commits. It’s a game about being blind that allows you to see. It’s a game about things that go bump in the night, but those horrors rarely show up to threaten you. There are some strong moments peppered throughout Perception, and some great, chilling histories to uncover in this virtual haunted house, but it plays at much bigger ideas than its surface-level exploration can handle.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    This is perhaps the most damning and instructive thing I can say about Rime. Save for its manipulative final moments, I spent the of the entirety of the game completely stone-faced. I felt only a detached appreciation for visuals and music that, because of the monotonous game they envelop, never congeal into something really moving. No giggles of delight, no gasps of wonder, just ... nothing. I didn’t hate Rime. I didn’t love Rime. I played Rime for a while, then later, it ended.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Reservoir Dogs is a movie that succeeds on its attitude and storytelling. Without any of those elements making it into Reservoir Dogs: Bloody Days, the attempts to remind me of the film became an annoyance, a reminder that I could be doing something better with my time. But even without the Reservoir Dogs branding, Bloody Days doesn’t come close to succeeding. The time rewind mechanic could have made for a unique experience, but it’s squandered on a mediocre, forgettable shoot-’em-up.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Old Man’s Journey is sweet, meandering and undemanding, a pleasant while-away that's full of feeling, at least for as long as the journey lasts.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    This is a game about sitting through cutscenes and playing battles. That gets tiring more quickly than a better-balanced game would — especially because Shadows of Valentia is committed to preserving those same dated systems. Its story was gripping enough to pull me through, but mustering the energy to sit through obtuse battles was Shadows of Valentia’s biggest challenge.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Injustice 2 is NetherRealm once again outdoing itself. This is the best, most polished, most impressively produced story mode to ever feature in a fighting game. The game’s cast — more than a dozen of which are newly playable characters — is varied and interesting, thanks to additions like Swamp Thing, Supergirl and the Red Lantern who has a blood-vomiting space cat, Atrocitus. Even if you aren’t a diehard DC Universe fan, there’s bound to be someone on the roster you’ll love to play as...Plus, you get to beat up Superman.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    The game nails the basics of aiming and firing a gun in a way that’s incredibly satisfying — even if the Aim controller feels more mandatory than optional. Farpoint may seem basic in a few years, once VR design has progressed past the point of simple shooters. But right now, as developers are still wrestling with the language of virtual reality, it’s tough to get the basics right in any VR game, much less a big budget shooter. Farpoint isn’t perfect, but it nails those basics.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The frustrating boss fights and the mediocre plot are blemishes on what is, by and large, a much better game than I ever would have expected. When I reviewed Lords of the Fallen in 2014, I said it was "a surprising show of skill and hopefully a sign of much brighter things to come." By building on its more obvious inspirations with a more unique vision, Deck13 has fulfilled even more of that initial promise with The Surge.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 45 Critic Score
    NBA Playgrounds is very nice to look at and its roster has a strong depth that any basketball fan will appreciate. But rather than build a game with hilarious, rollicking action and balance out how that is scored and defended, NBA Playgrounds imposes condition after condition on the users and cripples any chance at consistent fun.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    Rakuen gives full range to the power of its truth. It’s thoughtful, beautiful, sad and funny. It presents itself as a childlike narrative game, but it offers unsettling and affirming truths about the way we live. I feel privileged to have spent time with its characters, with their weaknesses and their strengths. This is an extraordinary game.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It often feels more like a thing to do rather than a game to play. While I loved the cute aesthetic and simplicity of its mechanics, the game gave way to tediousness and dullness far too often for such grand subject matter. It felt nice slipping into grade school nostalgia for a few hours, but I’m not in fourth grade anymore. A thing to do isn’t enough anymore.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Arkane has the confidence to let Prey end on its own terms, even if it occasionally leans too heavily on its least interesting aspects. When it looks most like a shooter, Prey is merely competent. But as a mystery, a deep space haunted house with dozens of stories of tragedy and humanity to tell, Prey is a remarkably successful archaeological expedition — and it manages to compellingly ruminate on what it means to be.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The frustration in TumbleSeed seems to be by design, at least, but it didn't feel particularly earned. This is the type of game where you’re meant to die dozens of times, that will take tens of hours to reach the "end," even before taking into account the daily challenges and endless replayability of randomized runs. Between its unique core mechanic and the gorgeous, colorful 2D world it’s built around, TumbleSeed makes a case to spend those dozens of hours rolling up its mountain. But the lack of control over the character mixed with some extremely punishing design choices pushed me away well before I reached the summit, and I can’t say that I expect to return.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    Dragon Quest Heroes II is exactly the kind of game that, one year from now, I won’t even remember playing. It’s entertaining enough, but in spite of that it never quite finds its stride. Each of its highest moments come with the knowledge of what the game is grasping towards but can’t quite reach, both as an RPG and as a Warriors game.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    As it stands, Full Throttle Remastered is a perfectly fine way to spend a couple evenings, but all the trappings of a 1995 video game are just under the surface for better or for worse. That’s guaranteed to be a selling point to some people and majorly off-putting to others. For myself? I think I might have enjoyed Full Throttle Remastered even more if I’d played with a guide open the whole time, like a joyride through the nostalgia of other people.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Sometimes the search for clues leads me into unpleasant surprises. During my demo, I asked the developer for a heads-up whenever any jump scares were coming up. I'm a total coward when it comes to horror. But I suspect horror fans will take these moments in their stride. The story evolves to include monsters, mysteries and special powers, as I earn abilities to best foes in set-piece action scenes. Otherwise, my character proves to be an agreeably grumpy fellow who just wants to know what the hell is going on. Wilson’s Heart looks like a solid narrative adventure that merges puzzles with combat in a stylish world.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Outlast 2 may be the single most qualified recommendation I’ve given in my history of writing reviews, and not just because of its occasionally stilted design. This is a game that often left me feeling like complete trash. It brought up some of the most difficult memories in my life, issues I had buried long ago. My reactions to that anguish have run the gamut, but more than anything, I respect that Outlast 2 has the singular focus and intensity to dredge up those emotions; that alone made it worth the time spent for me.

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