Punknews.org (Staff)'s Scores

  • Music
For 495 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 60% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 75
Highest review score: 100 The Center Won't Hold
Lowest review score: 10 Just Like You
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 10 out of 495
495 music reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An infectious album of either punk influenced pop or pop influenced punk. Whatever the appropriate term for the music here is, it gets stuck in your head.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There’s an intelligence wrapped in the machinery here. This is cyborg music driven by metal fingers, but the human heart is still intact.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It sounds like everything has been sounded down to the point where instruments tend to melt together and it can actually be hard to hear what is going on at some points. It doesn’t ruin the release, but it does make it sound vastly different on different unites. (i.e. the EP actually sounds really good – if not a little too slick- on my home stereo, but on my car stereo, it sounds watery).
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Overall, Moral Hygiene is a damn solid Ministry album. The band has had many peaks and valleys over the course of a nearly 40 year career, but they’re once again proving that they’re still relevant.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Cool is not only a masterful release sonically, but it strikes a cosmic chord that few release can hit.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    What’s particularly neat here is that record masterminds Mike Haliechuk and Jonah Falco have forged their most diverse and chameleon-onic sound bed to date.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's wildly accessible and I think what works the most is you just wouldn't be able to tell what kind of band they really are and what's their definitive sound -- which is a beautiful chaos that works in Turnstile's favor.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Vocalist Tim McIlrath must be given credit as well, as his voice -- and overall production -- is as tight as ever. Technically, I found their last couple albums lacking, feeling too generic and polished, but it's a much better balance now.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Ultimately, it feels like too much is crammed in and AFI can't tell if they want to go pop, goth, retro or symphonic. And with something that schizophrenic, it undercuts a lot of what could have been diamonds in the rough.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is a slight return to form for Dropkick Murphys. It’s probably not going to occupy the same place in your heart as Do Or Die or Sing Loud, Sing Proud, but you can’t expect 50 year old guys to make the same record they made at 25. Give Turn Up That Dial a listen. You might just be pleasantly surprised.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Here, it's a lot more of that soft-loud dynamic, that visceral arrangement on the buildups and honestly, a lot more of Andy's iconic poetry. ... It frees them even more creatively, and I love the growth shown.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Assembly shows that while Strummer solo may have more nuance or more room for interpretation, the raw power of his early work had been washed over with music that, was frankly, quieter. ... It also proves that Strummer solo can stand on its own, even if that stance will always be in the shadow of an earlier band.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Whereas most inside/silly jokes are used by a closed group to draw their own bonds closer, here, the Melvins are using that device to invite people into the world. And frankly, it’s a fun and funny world despite the gratuitous use of the F-word.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Detroit Stories is fully formed and tells its story without trying too hard… or too little. The band cranks on the engine and lets Jesus… err… the Ashetons, Fred Sonic Smith, and Glen Buxton… take the wheel and they drive this record on home.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Open Door Policy is the album longtime fans have been waiting for. The lyrics are there and the music is there.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    I didn't get that rough cut as much as I would have liked on this album, but other than that, this is a front-to-back gem with great replay value and anthemic shout-alongs I wish I could take in live.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    I think this record has to be taken in isolation and taken in context of needed something to do during the pandemic. But regardless, No Fun Mondays is a pop-rocking good time.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There’s a lot of good here. The band’s personality has never shown through like this in the studio before.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    I think the punk rock attitude is to not easily be impressed with technical musicianship that doesn’t make you feel much of anything. American Head didn’t hit me in the heart or in the gut, but it did make me want to go back and listen to “She Don’t Use Jelly” again and, if nothing else, that’s a positive that comes from this experience.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Te nearly two dozen guests here add both a gravitas and liveliness to the LP.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's another commendable effort from Weiss waxing on about life and love, and the changes we're all enduring in these dire times. I can tell it would have had more impact for me if some of the fat were trimmed, or if it were split into two EPs, but hey... IIOI not at their best is still quite better than many bands hitting their heights these days, especially in the indie/emo genre.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is a good album, but it’s one of those albums that either has too much or too little of something.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If you're a fan of The Front Bottoms, you should consider that folk/indie/acoustic era totally dead. And it's not a bad thing to accept because art involves evolution and experimentation, and while it even took me a while to get accustomed to TFB's pop-mainstream aura, it's a jacket worn pretty damn well as In Sickness & In Flames shows.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    As talented as Oberst is on his own, his symbiotic relationship with the other members of Bright Eyes makes it easily Oberst’s best project and one I hope continues on for the foreseeable future.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As a time capsule, Live at Goose Lake documents and cements the legacy of the Stooges. No one really questioned this, mind you, but it’s nice to have even more evidence to show that the praises heaped on this band aren’t supported by fandom as much as they are supported by white, hot recorded proof.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The Frank Turner side of the record wins the West Coast Vs. Wessex war. Whether it’s due to Fat Mike’s songwriting, or Turner’s vision is hard to say. I doubt this will ever occupy that special place in our hearts that NOFX/Rancid did, but it’s still a fun listen. It’s not a game changer at this point, but there’s still enough good stuff that fans of both acts are going to want to pick this up.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Hum hasn't missed a step, giving light to why bands like Quicksand and Slowdive resonate with their loud/soft dynamic.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    What I think makes this album stand out just a bit more, edgier and whatnot, from her debut three years ago in Stranger in the Alps is there's a fearlessness to embrace the mainstream aesthetic just a bit more. Not something like Lana del Rey's style or that kind of thing, but a more contemporary, alternative and dare I say poppy sound.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    All in all, this is a great album. Musically, it will be at home in the record collections of anyone who likes the previous bands the members of Coriky have been in. The lyrics are poignant and they’re delivered by some of the strongest voices punk has ever seen.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Somehow, 40 years later, that fundamental sound is still intact. More than that, instead of sounding stale, it feels like a breath of fresh air. In a world of homogenized punk, it’s good to be able to throw on a record like Alphabetland and be reminded of what a rich tapestry punk can be.