Punknews.org (Staff)'s Scores

  • Music
For 434 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 61% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 35% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 75
Highest review score: 100 True North
Lowest review score: 10 Just Like You
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 10 out of 434
434 music reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    They’re never going to knock you down with their raw power. But, like the Midwestern cities of southwestern Ohio that birthed them ... you’ll find a lot of beauty if you stick around long enough.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Every song on this album is strong, starting from the compelling opener, “Satellite,” which firmly establishes the return to the classic Get Up Kids style which is as strong of an opener as “Holiday” or “Man of Conviction.”
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    While Bad Religion’s forays into new territory may be subtle, they’re certainly there, and it’s commendable to see a nearly 40 year old band still trying to find ways to innovate and make their sound fresh and new. I know that I’ll catch some grief for this, but I honestly would call this the best Bad Religion album since The Empire Strikes First, and a sign of a revitalized band that’s ready to start making some more great music again.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s fun and enjoyable. It's exciting, even if nothing new is being done.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There’s something to be said about the immediacy and the vitality of something as messy and as real as an album like White Stuff. Nothing about what this band is has diminished over time, and White Stuff is a roaring return to right where Royal Trux left off 19 years ago.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    We have the most lush Mountain Goats record to date: Pallett was the perfect producer for the album.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ultimately, by the time the final song rolls around, you can't help but wish this ran a few songs longer, which is indicative of how good the album is.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Morbid Stuff is punk rock at its best. PUP has delivered something that achieves the rare feat of satisfying older fans while also leveling them up career-wise.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A profound confidence is demonstrated throughout the record and the group makes the timeless argument that strong simplicity beats fancy fretwork- and it always does.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    "Hum" has a wedding feel to it, and while the aesthetic picks up a bit on "Low Slow" the overall vibe of the album just feels a bit monotone at times. But don't get me wrong, the worst Laura Stevenson is way better than 90% of the crap on the radio today. And that's testament to how good and how golden she really is.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    When all's said and done, the record dips and swells (see "Fulton Street I") to reflect the oscillations of life and from these tracks here, it's hard to call LD and The Wave nothing short of timeless.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    One of the most relatable, heartbreakingly specific albums of the year.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It’s not that The Black Album is a very bad album, just that it feels part of a larger calculus that’s so carefully planned out that it lacks any of the artistic spontaneity that their first two albums had, which is exactly what the band’s been missing ever since Pinkerton.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Health's dark musical aesthetic feels as fresh as ever. ... Now, that's not to say there aren't a couple misses like "Rat Wars", but all in all, the androgynous energy of Jake Duzsik on the mic is more than enough to shape another pulsating yet nihilistic soundscape that reminds us how Health ages well like fine wine.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Blurring the lines between LP and EP, Crush on Me is nine songs in twenty-six minutes, two of which are reprises and one is an outro. You’ll know from the minute she scream-chants “I changed my hair” on opener “Heels” whether or not this is for you.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Most of their new venture fits this bill and is actually worth the hype.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This album definitely cranks out most of their hits, although it's a tall order as their first four records are perfect front to back.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ultimately, with such amazing writers, this album's going to drill deep down into you and leave you missing the things you need in life. The persons you love and the moments you may think's best to forget.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The filler tracks don't resonate at all but still, for what it's worth, this record doesn't say just anything... for fans of Max and the band over the years, it says everything.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's classic Fidlar. However, while the musical style's sure to leave fans scratching their heads, peer a bit deeper and you'll see their signature's very much there--it's just, well, diluted and funkier than ever.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    All in all, Swervedriver delivers the goods but with this record, it's safe to say it could have come years ago. I'd love to hear them take a risk and mix it up moving forward.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    If you don’t want to listen to it, don’t. Weezer couldn’t care less. But for anyone that likes a good clean pop cover by a band who is very good at cover songs, hey, here’s ten songs for you.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Evil Spirits is compact and focused. Instead of trying any new idea they might come across, the band, perhaps refreshed from the rather long period since their last album, has asked themselves, and not the fans, what the Damned are and have crafted a release that acts as much as a return to glory as it does a self-definition for the band.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    These are some of Cube’s hardest and most energetic beats since the ‘90s.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It is just such a cut above everything they’ve done that it warrants a listen from anyone into fearless and challenging, yet still melodic, experimental rock. It's their finest work, and probably this year's best rock album.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Seriously, these songs feel like Smashing Pumpkins demos--grainy, rough, atmospheric--like if they were made in a garage, and I think that's exactly what CN wanted to achieve. Rough, raw and rugged, but still jangly, catchy and head-poppy enough to leave you wanting more.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This whole album really takes no prisoners, and brings to mind everything that was good in the underground music scene from the eighties into the early/mid-nineties. Lyrically, the band takes no prisoners and holds nothing back shouting down religion, political leaders the world over, and anyone else that gets in their way. They also are able to do what so many modern bands fail to do, blend their influences well.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Cursive has made an uneasy record for their fans that may be too on the nose, which is clearly the intention.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Bought to Rot is an exploration and an experiment, but a highly successful one that manages to come together as a coherent whole to really deliver something special.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Through A Wall dropped as a surprise and what I love most about it is it's so bold in that it goes right back to the sound of old after last year's Our Pleasure seemed to take a more catchy, melodic and dare I say, poppy route.