Punknews.org (Staff)'s Scores

  • Music
For 478 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 60% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 75
Highest review score: 100 Pythons
Lowest review score: 10 Future Hearts
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 10 out of 478
478 music reviews
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There’s a lot of good here. The band’s personality has never shown through like this in the studio before.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    I think the punk rock attitude is to not easily be impressed with technical musicianship that doesn’t make you feel much of anything. American Head didn’t hit me in the heart or in the gut, but it did make me want to go back and listen to “She Don’t Use Jelly” again and, if nothing else, that’s a positive that comes from this experience.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Te nearly two dozen guests here add both a gravitas and liveliness to the LP.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's another commendable effort from Weiss waxing on about life and love, and the changes we're all enduring in these dire times. I can tell it would have had more impact for me if some of the fat were trimmed, or if it were split into two EPs, but hey... IIOI not at their best is still quite better than many bands hitting their heights these days, especially in the indie/emo genre.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is a good album, but it’s one of those albums that either has too much or too little of something.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If you're a fan of The Front Bottoms, you should consider that folk/indie/acoustic era totally dead. And it's not a bad thing to accept because art involves evolution and experimentation, and while it even took me a while to get accustomed to TFB's pop-mainstream aura, it's a jacket worn pretty damn well as In Sickness & In Flames shows.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    As talented as Oberst is on his own, his symbiotic relationship with the other members of Bright Eyes makes it easily Oberst’s best project and one I hope continues on for the foreseeable future.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As a time capsule, Live at Goose Lake documents and cements the legacy of the Stooges. No one really questioned this, mind you, but it’s nice to have even more evidence to show that the praises heaped on this band aren’t supported by fandom as much as they are supported by white, hot recorded proof.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The Frank Turner side of the record wins the West Coast Vs. Wessex war. Whether it’s due to Fat Mike’s songwriting, or Turner’s vision is hard to say. I doubt this will ever occupy that special place in our hearts that NOFX/Rancid did, but it’s still a fun listen. It’s not a game changer at this point, but there’s still enough good stuff that fans of both acts are going to want to pick this up.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Hum hasn't missed a step, giving light to why bands like Quicksand and Slowdive resonate with their loud/soft dynamic.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    What I think makes this album stand out just a bit more, edgier and whatnot, from her debut three years ago in Stranger in the Alps is there's a fearlessness to embrace the mainstream aesthetic just a bit more. Not something like Lana del Rey's style or that kind of thing, but a more contemporary, alternative and dare I say poppy sound.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    All in all, this is a great album. Musically, it will be at home in the record collections of anyone who likes the previous bands the members of Coriky have been in. The lyrics are poignant and they’re delivered by some of the strongest voices punk has ever seen.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Somehow, 40 years later, that fundamental sound is still intact. More than that, instead of sounding stale, it feels like a breath of fresh air. In a world of homogenized punk, it’s good to be able to throw on a record like Alphabetland and be reminded of what a rich tapestry punk can be.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is a great album start to finish, there isn’t any filler and one song flows into the next one perfectly.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    He puts his vocals on bright display as compared to the sparse musical backing. It’s not quite the unrestrained dissection that Johnny Cash’s American Recordings series was, but it leans in that direction.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Titans of Creation is an enjoyable listen, and is going to be an essential purchase for all self respecting thrashers. It’s definitely another worthy addition to the already impressive Testament catalog.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Another powerful record from one of the most profound talents of this generation of us born in the '80s and '90s.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This record is a super early contender for album of the year for me though. It’s loud, dark, and thundering. Bambara suck you into their world for just under an hour, and as unpleasant as it can be. It’s not one you find yourself ready to leave.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Father of All Motherfuckers is a danceable, feel-good pop album with some really stellar songwriting and, after the impotent Revolution Radio and the ludicrous ¡Uno!, ¡Dos!, ¡Tré! trilogy, seeing Green Day branch out a bit and succeed at something different is refreshing. It’s a sign of artists with a great deal of range and imagination who are far from done surprising us.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Quiet Slang was the stripped-down version of the band so we don't need acoustics like "Nobody Say Nothing" or "Nowhere Bus" or the piano-driven closer "Bar No One". They're catchy, sure, but I mean, they're songs we've heard over and over so if it ain't new, at this point, please fix it. I do commend the band for attempting to cut a new road with songs like "Stiff" but again, it's all about sex appeal here and I just can't connect with a band and a vocalist that comes off like a 17 year-old who is now trying too hard.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If they look hard enough, any artist could find criticism of their work online. That’s sort of the curse of the Information Age. But not everyone overreacts quite as much as Eminem does. But if his fears grow tiring, his lyrical ability can still give you something to admire, even if the album is somewhat uneven.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The songs are well constructed and the playing sounds authentic. ... The issue comes when Corgan begins to sing, and it’s not his nasally voice that doesn’t work. ... He still, too often, thinks his voice deserves to be the loudest in the room. He’s still a city boy hung up on big ideas.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Cook nails it in the earliest stages, making it a bit front-loaded.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Admittedly, he plays to his strengths here more than in recent memory but again, some songs do just taper off like the reworked "Silent Key". Nonetheless, if you're a Frank fan, you'll enjoy, and if you're a cynic, well you might just find that there's not as much to hate here as you thought there'd be.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    You can tell these are songs that could come straight from the minds of Davey Havok and Jade Puget. I would admit sometimes they kill momentum of the album and one or two tracks do blend in and feel repetitive but the lyrics, messages and overall political edge compensate for these shortcomings.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    You Deserve Love from its title onward is a sweetly sincere effort made for the masses, which nowadays means it’s not for everyone. But hopefully You Deserve Love continues White Reaper’s constant rise toward the arenas. It sounds like it should.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    I love the tempo changes across the record and while this joint might not be for all JEW fans, I think most will appreciate a band that still feels like art and less like product, and more so, once that reminds us don't just survive -- get out there, seize the day and live.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Not their best, not their worst... but something that'll move you as usual and help you appreciate life for the gift it is.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album is pretty much a joyride from start to finish, moving through a number of different styles, driven by some of the best damn drumming you’ve ever heard. And everyone involved in writing these songs (yes, including Feldmann) is a talented lyricist who knows how to craft excellent pop songs. So ultimately, it’s a brilliantly fun album if you have the fortitude to look past a lot of very annoying studio effects to listen to what Blink-183 are really saying.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Yes, the Vivian Girls were and are good, but we already knew that. However, more importantly, Memeroy cements that NO ONE can do what this trio does and, more than that, they’re doing it even better now then they were before.