RapReviews.com's Scores

  • Music
For 827 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 62% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 The Iceberg
Lowest review score: 15 Excuse My French
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 19 out of 827
827 music reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Drake breaks no new ground here, and retreads the same tales of love and regret so many times that the songs bleed together. If you just want background music for making love, this is your album. If you want to have your imagination captured by fantastic tales or be taken on an emotional roller coaster, don’t bother. There are no highs or lows here. We’re on medium the whole time.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On “It’s Almost Dry”, Pusha T proves that while he is fixated on selling drugs (almost to an obsessive extent), he is also a truly creative and, yes, original artist.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    You know what you’re getting with Benny the Butcher, which is reliability, authenticity, and tough beats, but it rarely surprises, inspires, or leaves a lasting impression.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Through over 70 minutes of Lamar’s latest, every facet of life for the young Compton rapper is held up to the light. Love, pain, hope, despair, triumph, defeat, it’s all there. ... He’s a rapper who understands rapping is more than just a good beat, a good punchline, or a good vocal tone. He’s blessed to have all of that but he takes the platform he got from it and makes art that will last a lifetime.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    “Twelve Carat Toothache” doesn’t reveal a new facet of Austin Post, it just shines an even brighter light on the jewels that he drops.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even when you don’t understand his choices, you can’t argue with them, because you know they are coming from a place of thoughtful artistic creativity.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 45 Critic Score
    The hard truth is that “Dope Don’t Sell Itself” takes a tumble down into the same hole of forgettable 2 Chainz albums that has become home to the likes of “Trapavelli Tre’”, “Pretty Girls Like Trap Music”, “Collegrove” and the like. 2 Chainz seems burnt out.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    For the most part, the sound palette on “God Don’t Make Mistakes” is painted as dark and grimy which suits Conway’s visceral crime details. Though he isn’t from New York City, he’s got the grit to match it. Many of the tracks show off his penchant for detailed street life depictions with polysyllabic rhymes delivered in a veteran’s flow.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s remarkable how these beats all have their own feel yet still work as a cohesive whole. The well-worn joke in hip-hop circles that Nas picks bad beats is effectively wiped. Nas is, in his own words, reincarnated, but with an additional self-awareness that is more grounded than his last few performances. There’s no cryptocurrency chatter or verses shoehorned into trap instrumentals. There are no skips, this is simply good ol’ Nas distilled.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There are few better ways to ride through the current Omicron surge than spinning “Garbology” and joining Aesop and Blockhead as they excavate garbage for gold.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Sullivan herself is certainly an artist that doesn’t follow the rules, which is why it’s mildly disappointing to hear her sound like Post Malone or Juice WRLD on tracks. For a woman with as much power and agency as she clearly has, she let too much of this release be shaped by what other people sound like in terms of the production of her vocals and her instrumentals.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Hommy albums get better with repeated listens and he’s an artist that suits the album format. The antithesis of a regular coke rap rapper, his music carries a richer quality than Griselda regulars. Whether you can truly appreciate his craft depends on your patience and willingness to hear something a little different.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Overall, aside from some promising lines and one, maybe two standout tracks, “Richer Than I Ever Been” is an album that predictably falls short. It simply features too many weak beats backing up bars that often do more to bore than they do to convey a sense of skill or originality.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Those who grew up with a diversified rap album portfolio bridging different territories may find “Half God” cool, while those who are Cali native and not Cali transplants like Navy Blue may vehemently reject it as "that New York shit."
    • 88 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    “Call Me If You Get Lost” is undoubtedly a strong showing by Tyler, The Creator, to say the very least. Despite this album’s fantastic structuring and delivery, however, something that is always to be expected with this artist is that what he creates next will undoubtedly be even better.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    BBNG have been doing this since 2010 and over a decade+ they’ve gotten really good at what they do.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    She’s not mired in self-pity, but she is also not blindly overconfident and thoughtless. This combination of bravado and humility makes “Sometimes I Might Be Introvert” such a fantastic album. It shows an artists who is not afraid to grow, take chances, and let it all out there. All of that make it one of the better albums I’ve heard this year.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 45 Critic Score
    It’s beige, hollow music and that’s what ultimately frustrates your dedicated rap listener because it doesn’t make sense why it’s so damn popular. When you throw the poor writing on top of this, and some real hit-and-miss production into the mix, “Certified Lover Boy” may well be Drake’s worst album.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    I admire how empowered and unencumbered Ray BLK is, taking her time to release this album the way she wanted, choosing her own lane and not being forced to speed up or slow down for anybody else. I think you’ll enjoy it too.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Lil Nas X set out to make a crossover pop album with “MONTERO” and succeeded.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    In the end though it’s all just a little too polished, like a hip hop manicure after a rap spa day, one that leaves everything radiant and glossy but says nothing about what’s underneath.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Aside from these few niggles, this is easily Nas’ best record since 2012’s “Life is Good” and let’s be honest, a pleasant surprise.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s too slick and polished for a posthumous album.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    The good news is that he’s very easy to pay attention to. It’s hard to miss a word that he says. Either because of the incredibly short length, or his great attention to detail, or the Kenny Beats production (or all of the above) “Vince Staples” is a must listen. He was wiser than his years at 22, now he’s wiser than his peers too.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The cons of “The Inspired Soundtrack” is that some tracks, much like movie scenes, could’ve simply been left on the cutting room floor since they don’t belong. However, their inclusion highlights the more quality songs on the album, the ones that coincide with the movie’s themes, ones which still are fought against in the present day.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    There’s a very real, dare I say relatable feel to Cole’s music that “The Off Season” continues to highlight. Unfortunately, it’s a few songs short of being a great album as Cole experiments with some different styles of production that aren’t always successful. Cole’s nearly-man mentality produces a nearly-great album.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    Though Swizz did vary the sound of the production, the album’s overall sound could’ve benefitted from a P.K. or Dame Grease beat. “Exodus” isn’t DMX’s worst album, but for a comeback album, a now-posthumous one at that, it should’ve been better.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The album’s sole difference from its predecessor is the length. It’s not lyrically mind-blowing, but its hip-hop for fans in the know and those tired of the vapid mainstream.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    Ultimately the album gets away with overly familiar breaks thanks to the superb level of stars. ... It’s not his best compilation, it’s not his worst, but it’s another one.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    The raps are solid and the production under Fraud is not polished, but more refined this time around. All in all, “The Plugs I Met 2” is another feather in Benny’s cap.