Resident Advisor's Scores

  • Music
For 1,116 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 41% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 75
Highest review score: 100 Biokinetics [Reissue]
Lowest review score: 36 Déjà-Vu
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 1 out of 1116
1116 music reviews
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On You Said You'd Hold My Hand Through The Fire, they lay bare their heartbreak through squalls of sound, managing softness even in the album's more hardened sonic environments.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Bridging that pop-underground divide has always been what makes Gou an interesting artist, but on I Hear You, she can't seem to veer from the middle of the road.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Actress is still working at something like the peak of his powers, and there's never a wrong step on Statik—never an idea that falls flat, never a moment where Cunningham feels like he's compromising his sound rather than simply choosing to work in a smoother style on his latest whim.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Less is more has never been a part of Kaytranada's creative ethos, and while there are many ear-catching tidbits on Timeless, the LP also has its fair share of moments that get lost in the shuffle. .... But even with these misses, the album never fully slides into outright dullness—there's always a big idea or complex breakdown right around the corner.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    "I think about it all the time" is among the most surprising moments on the record, as Aitchison sings about the possibilities and paranoias of motherhood so openly and casually like she quickly scribbled on the back of a napkin—that it comes between heaving dance floor tracks only underlines how Aitchison is harnessing her chaotic energy to the fullest, but also how real it is. .... BRAT finds the sweet spot most leftfield pop stars only dream of: keep it experimental and referential, but enjoy the party while it lasts.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a dense, longform piece of near future sci-fi that clothes abstract storytelling in visceral, goosebump-inducing club music.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Lives Outgrown is a quiet folk album, but there are elements of the carnivalesque and the sublime.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Both introspective and marking the importance of community and friendship, I AM JORDAN is energising music that can only instill joy and catharsis.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    There's an intimacy here that compliments Broadcast's already close, cosy sound. Even the shorter songs bear fruit. .... It's hard not to imagine what these songs could have been: would Broadcast have kept them as-is and dove more into psychedelic folk, or would they have embellished more, and added more synths and electronics? Either way, it's a fascinating glimmer of what they might have done next.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The guest vocalists round out the album's satisfying balance of antiquated and futuristic.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Affection is everything one would want from a pop album—the way it shimmies along with catchy beats, whistle-along melodies and hooks that easily live rent-free in the long-term memory banks. The Jenkins touch here is an unmistakable charm that could very well nudge Affection into "cult album" territory.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Hyperdrama is more impactful than Woman, but not quite as ostentatiously in-your-face as Audio, Video, Disco. The duo sound better for it.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It was a chance encounter with Stanford's Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics that helped Jain discover her knack for producing this kind of music. That kind of serendipitous experience illustrates what she's instilling here—following the seeds of your interest, however small, to blossom the singularity of your voice. For Arushi Jain, spring has sprung.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The Road To Hell Is Paved With Good Intentions, just slightly overcorrects with its mainstream-seeking direction, opting for more James Blake-esque electronic pop and reeling in the eccentricities.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    She's become somewhat of an experimental music poster child by democratizing styles like field recordings and sound collages, which may seem daunting to new listeners. sentiment leans heavily into this, finding a middle ground between often structureless musique concrète and DIY pop tunes.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Hunt's debut isn't just a representation of her compelling Emotional Junglist sound, but a firm push against the boundaries of modern, nostalgic jungle, underlining how much even the toughest dance music can benefit from a little vulnerability.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The results are unmistakably Mount Kimbie, showcasing their love for pop, R&B, electronica and Krautrock, while also forging a new identity for themselves within indie rock.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's her strongest project to date, a thrilling fusion of classical and electronic music delivered in astounding clarity.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The history of misogyny that followed Journey In Satchidananda complicates the serenity and innovation within it.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The results are astoundingly beautiful, like a field recording taken from some uncharted corner of the earth. Elsewhere, the climax at the end of the ominous "Talking To The Whisper" beggars belief, it's a traffic jam of cascading keys, sporadic drumming, serpentine brass and more, an explosion of chaotic sound to conclude one of her best songs ever.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a record that balances the hardcore continuum with emotion as she turns out club tunes touched by vulnerability.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Tyla's music hovers in a zone that occupies amapiano, Afrobeats, and R&B all at once. That she's able to occupy all these spaces in a way that feels familiar is a testament to her poise and ingenuity.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The way he calls back to nearly all of his past projects, one could make the mistake that Hebden's best years are behind him. That would be missing the point, though. Regardless of all the attention he's received from his massive performances, he's still looking for new ways to be Four Tet.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    As excerpts of poetry sound like heart-stricken dialogue and foggy soundscapes take the shape of a score, it often steps out of the confines of music and begins to approach theatre.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album bops and bangs as he explores throbbing Detroit techno and bouncy Kraftwerkian synth pop, overlaying those genres with recordings of his time in Hong Kong to create a deeply spiritual album that fuses traditions, lineages and memories.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Instead of building on the momentum of her songwriting career, Still pulls her back into her comfort zone, with promising hints of something new waiting in the spaces between.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Adult Contemporary might not break any new ground or present any radical ideas, but as the familiar saying goes, "if it ain't broke, don't fix it."
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The real freaks can nerd out on the harmonic theory that will wash right over most ears on this divinely sequenced record. You don't need to be educated to enjoy Malone's music: it's emotive, world-building and all-encompassing. The beauty lies within that.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Wise's third album is striking not only because of his unparalleled voice or his candid verse, parts of his artistry that already caught our attention on the last two albums, but because of the way these elements come together in such an assured way, in a space that demands swagger bravado from its virtuosos delivered with a welcome vulnerability.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    King Perry (released on Tricky's label—he also co-produces four tracks) simply falls flat, lost in technological tricks and devoid of Perry's classic, quizzical warmth.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Vibrant, dynamic displays that veer towards transcendence. Rife with the yearning for more prevalent love, Lovegaze is a bewitching offering of psychedelia and astral folk that goes beyond the mind, and peers into the soul of a distinct talent as she exalts beauty in its rawest forms.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This album can work when it's in service of something other than itself. Listened to in smaller stretches, it becomes a bit easier to digest, and opens up a bit.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While Songs Of Silence succeeds as a rich and intriguing drone album then, it won't satisfy those hoping to learn more about one of British pop's great enigmas.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It keeps intact what makes her one of the most exciting UK pop acts of the 2020s, gesturing towards the mainstream while still keeping one foot in her musical hometown. It's the kind of record a promising artist puts out before they release something truly next-level.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Not so serious, just damn fun. Davis is taking big swings, purposely stomping through giant puddles like a kid again, eager to see how stain patterns form. So even when he misses, he still hits.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Part of the reason why LXXXVIII is so enjoyable is all these callbacks—it's catnip to a diehard Actress fan. There's a few new wrinkles on there, sure—the jazzy chord changes, the piano, the almost formless ambient sections—but mostly it's what he does best.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Gamble successfully deploys his robotic collaborators as tools in his sonic worldbuilding rather than as ends in themselves.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a boisterous, life-affirming record that successfully blends essential elements of dancefloor house music with some of the more convivial markers of Peruvian and Latin American music and culture at large.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Across Goodbye, Hotel Arkada, she continues to craft poignant work that tints the atmosphere, transporting the listener to the remembrances and moments of imagination that float freely within the mind's eye.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    At 16 songs and with impressive guest features, it's a sprawling portrait of James, one with mostly dark and subdued tones.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's an album that sounds less extreme than it has any right to, inspiring a cold and technical appreciation for Lopatin's craftsmanship, but not necessarily excitement.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Some of the most affecting ambient music of the year, and perhaps even the very best in Halo's rich, unpredictable catalogue.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If only Tension lived up to the promise that she might be given something different. As it is, though, it's another entry in a rock-solid catalogue of dependable, uplifting club pop.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With its unabashed focus on large, universal emotions softened by the weight of adult experience, softscars is a beautiful blast from the past, made brighter with its emotionally timeless themes and crunchy rock aesthetics.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's another sharp turn in the road on the winding journey of a creative nomad.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Their tenth LP, For That Beautiful Feeling, returns to their well-established formula once again, at times surging with renewed ambition and other times falling curiously flat.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Playing Robots Into Heaven pitches itself right in the middle, swallowing up Blake's wounded reveries in a tide of dance floor-friendly inspiration. It's the most vital he's sounded in years.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    trip9love...??? is easily one of the greatest accomplishments in the small but impressive Tirzah catalogue.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Eyeroll is Ziúr's most punk record to date, planting her proudly on the fringes where she's happiest.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Instead of attempting to reinvent the wheel, he refines and extends his legacy, preserving the familiar while hearkening back to the uncanny moods that shroud his best ambient-leaning works.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Backed by a cast of co-producers like Pearson Sound, Tensnake and Paul White, she expands her sound to fit these more bracing topics, without losing the DIY charm that made her an instant star to begin with.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Huge credit is due to Audika: while Picture Of Bunny Rabbit is an archival compilation built from disparate sources, it feels like the kind of asymmetrical, twisty little solo album Russell would have made himself, not just a bonus disc.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It once again proves Barbieri to be a singular talent in the realm of synthesizer music, creating enormous, intimidating, completely enveloping work.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The spirit of those dance floors lives on through this second volume of the Legacy series.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Further Out Than The Edge's vibrant cast of characters, lively experimental rhythms and rich improvisation underlines why Speakers Corner Quartet are so firmly embedded within South London's musical landscape.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Guy
    There's so much clarity and hope to be found in Jayda G's marriage of production with songwriting that any cloying moments are easily forgiven.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even in the depths of despair she still managed to turn out something that feels lush and enticing. DREAMER is one of those albums people revisit for all kinds of reasons, whether they're sitting drinking wine with friends or out on a walk in need of a good cry.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    I Hope You Can Forgive Me, ten songs under a half hour that move quickly but stay with you long after, is a full-fledged real-time resume that demonstrates how complex rhythms and careful arrangements can elevate the human voice to the ultimate instrument.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Secret Life is undeniably gorgeous. But it's a mainstream, you-know-how-this-ends kind of gorgeous, like a Hollywood remake of some European arthouse film. ... It's difficult to be mad at Secret Life. But the bigger problem is that it's hard to feel anything at all.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For the most part, though, their method bears fruit, yielding an irresistibly catchy pop record that holds true to its humble Welsh roots.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Tightening up the chaos that blighted his sophomore record, The Rat Road doubles down on SBTRKT's multi-genre vision and pulls it off slightly better. His cocktail of pop and underground influences sounds more decisive and refined, though there are still moments that fizzle rather than ignite.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Emerson's decision to duck out of dance music and resurface as an indie-electronica artist for her long-awaited debut album feels like a risk, but in its well-worn and world-weary approach to songwriting, it's also deeply familiar, almost comforting.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    But what comes off at first as blistering and self-deprecating actually reveals her deep reverence and respect for her own complexity.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Whatever you want and could ever require from the progressive soul textbook is up in here. Darts, slaps, bops and most definitely thumpers. ... Renders a greater reward than we could ever envision. Voice Notes gives us just that.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The complexities of No Highs are masked by its minimalism. Hecker pairs expansive and bright songs with more repetitive compositions, capturing the beauty in uneasiness and vice versa, and keeping the album from blurring into an ambient haze.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It traces Yaeji's emotional development, coming to terms with anger and resentment she had suppressed as a child—a period that she channels into her charged and surprisingly bracing new LP.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's meant to be experienced in one fell swoop. Once the record works its magic on you, it'll be hard to pull out a single moment.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Crash Recoil relishes in the same spontaneity offered by Child's live performances, composed of songs that feel more structured like cinematic scenes than traditional techno tracks.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The album nostalgically embraces all corners of rock music past with post-punk, heavy metal glossy shoegaze and more, while still pushing the boundaries a good distance forward. ... If The Asymptotical World was the sunset preceding the meteor, then Praise A Lord is the big hunk of rock itself. The resulting explosion—in all of its chaotic, god-defying beauty—leaves a fully formed rock superstar emerging from its ashes.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    WOW
    Listening to WOW delivers genuine warmth, happiness and light. Within these settings, Shilonosova expands her ever-evolving and inquisitive personal soundworld of beautiful music for the body and the mind.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On the most fully realized vision of the Fever Ray project yet, Dreijer unspools some of their best lyrics and pop songs since The Knife's 2007 smash "Heartbeats.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is an album about possibilities rather than parameters, and it's a highlight in both artists' recent catalogs.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The album gets off to a rough start with "Don't Leave Me Like This," whose poppy melancholy could be better appreciated if Bobby Raps's vocals weren't distorted to an infuriating chipmunk pitch. ... But on tracks like "Way Back," Moore shines, and his knack for earworm melodies, genre mashups and collaboration comes through.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Listening to the album feels like opening a time capsule to the early and mid-10s, a period marked by a cheesy, over-the-top hedonism that might only be truly understood if you survived the Great Recession and saw Obama become president twice. ... It's easier to get behind Quest For Fire when Moore's dubstep influences are subtler.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A Carrollian multiverse of shapes, sounds and ideas that only becomes richer the longer you spend there. It might take some time, but it's endlessly rewarding.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Raven's underwater mood is all-consuming and meditative, so much so that it takes several listens to fully comprehend all the infinitesimal details that contribute to its brilliance—the sound of water bubbling, a flourishing synth or Kelela's pristine, whispered harmonies.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Though Malone's music can often feel still, one thing's for certain about Does Spring Hide Its Joy: it'll move you.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    12
    Sakamoto has made a workaday logbook into something transcendent, partly because of its intimacy. Whether it's one of his major works is a question for future historians, but coming amidst an ongoing struggle with cancer, its bravery is defiant and splendid, the sound of an artist's soul laid bare.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The result is one of the most punchy, lyrically explorative UK rap albums of the year.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The extended runtimes on Perpetual Now provide each of these pensive sound pieces enough room to tell their own meandering stories, with a dynamism that takes you out of time, placing you firmly within each boundless, everchanging meditation. At this music's core is an insight into the machinations of rRoxymore's mind.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Together, Dom Maker and Kai Campos are something truly special. Apart, they still sound pretty damn talented, which makes this diversion a welcome one as the group work towards their next grand statement.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While the record is a joyous, uplifting listen, there are not many surprises. After hearing Dijon in full effect on her previous LP, it left me with residual disappointment about the album's untapped potential. But there are still moments to be excited about on the album's B-side.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Gibson's earlier work mixed pop mastery with genuine feeling. Actual Life 3 is the Hollywood remake, with not-quite-convincing lookalikes and a script laden with clichés.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    She's a musician adept at using her voice as an instrument, and with it she can convey appealing, addicting hooks. And these strengths are complemented by her crew of reliable producers. ... Even with a roster of collaborators like this, the record occasionally hits a bump when the ambitious, sometimes challenging production doesn't fit her idiosyncratic flow, like on the Sega Bodega-produced "Little Bit." But on the best moments, her vocals mesh seamlessly with off-kilter backing tracks.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's like listening to the sea, before the strings slip in and out of tune like crashing waves. The beauty that emerges throughout the record requires patience to be appreciated in full and—to Frahm's credit—when it arrives, it's worth the wait.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's the most relaxed, comfortable album he's ever made, and it's a delight to drift along with him.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This foray beyond the confines of UK rap doesn't leave the album feeling muddled or stylistically confused—her out-there synth rap sound remains consistent throughout, for a polished, elegant debut album that stands tall inside (and outside) the UK's rap scene.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    On Natural Brown Prom Queen, she proves she belongs to no mood, genre or period of time. Over a placeless mix of sounds and endlessly dynamic beats she comes of age, shaping Black histories into exciting futures, all while making it clear that her idea of home is wherever she decides it is at any given moment.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The strength of In These Times is in its considered arrangements. The melodies take center stage rather than solely the kinetic rhythmic attack McCraven can unleash whenever he pleases. And when he pleases, his percussion charts can hit with a ferocity that shudders like drum licks plucked from a lengthy Fela-meets James-Brown after-hours live session.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The final result is up there, but as it jumps frantically from idea to idea, it dulls the impact of its best ideas in favour of others that might have been best left in a folder along with hundreds of other loops on his laptop.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Like any such grand project, it's daring and indulgent, occasionally weighed down by its own pretence, and the result is several songs on the album that seem to unspool in no direction in particular. But that unwinding is usually gripping, and like the other two albums Björk's recent renaissance—Utopia and Vulnicura—Fossora stuns more often than it doesn't.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As a whole, the album succeeds at doing something tricky: pandering to fans of theory, minimalism and ambient music all in equal measure.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There's a weightiness to Polar's songwriting that both complements and contrasts the crystalline production touches.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    With slightly more judicious editing, Let's Turn It Into Sound could have been a grand crossover statement, combining admittedly trendy synth experiments with freak-folk charisma. But that's not what Smith is going for here. Instead, the LP feels like listening to someone try out a new talent, learning as they go along, substituting practiced polish with a hunger for new ideas and self-expression.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Where her past work could sound like it was written for a grandiose 18th-century opera house, Living Torch is closer to the long-lost sonic component of a modern art installation, endless in its possibilities and imagination.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's both humble and ambitious, wonderfully arranged in some places and slightly clumsy in others (the Popol Vuh-isms of "Start A New Life" kill the album's momentum just three tracks in, and I've yet to be convinced by Weber's humdrum vocals). But for an artist who has always been earnest and upfront about big melodies, Garden Gaia feels like the logical next step, freeing him from his techno past.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What I Breathe feels like both a jumping-off point for dance music newbies and a feast of great ideas for those who have been around the block a few times. It's all held together by great pacing, frankly amazing production and a lack of cynicism that feels refreshing, open-hearted to the very last moment.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Although Spirit Exit, both more expansive and more restrained, doesn't oscillate as wildly as her previous expeditions, the heart strings remain plucked in gorgeous loops and motifs that spiral out into infinity.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The result is some of the most intimate and grandiose music he's ever produced.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Beyoncé is clearly itching to experiment with her sound. This latest album may not be her most cohesive release, but it does come with a handful of well-executed surprises. ... The album falls flat when it tries too hard to immerse itself in a culture that does not belong to Beyoncé.