Rolling Stone's Scores

For 5,386 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 64% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 The Beatles [White Album] [50th Anniversary Super Deluxe Edition]
Lowest review score: 0 Scream
Score distribution:
5386 music reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    At its heart, Down in the Weeds is a wounded, hopeful take on the Los Angeles midlife-crisis record (he moved there a few years ago). It’s a topic well-suited for Oberst’s abstract cynicism, as he tackles crumbling SoCal interstates, Malibu beach disasters, and, of course, yoga.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The record flows, hitting knee-skinning highs like “Stuck in Your Head” (“I just wanted to pick up the tempo!” Bognanno sing-songs as the band counts off), barn-burners like “You” (about, it seems, an absent parent) and the hauntingly discordant “Hours and Hours.” Whatever the subject matter, whatever the tempo, each track finds Bognanno full-throated, wild and free.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Full of shiny seventies pop rock simulations, but you would be much better off putting on an old Todd Rundgren or Raspberries record. [Aug 2020, p.73]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's kind of like a psychedelic Randy Newman. [Aug 2020, p.73]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Modern electric blues as Prince and George Clinton would have it. [Aug 2020, p.73]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Examines small-town origins, fatherhood, and matter of the heart with extra earnestness but few surprises. [Aug 2020, p.73]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    All of the pieces in the box set complete a puzzle that explains how McCartney found himself again and hit the stride that has propelled him to the present day.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Although they indulge more textures this time, they don’t stray so far from Dogrel’s art-punk blueprint to the point of losing themselves. It’s just that the palette is wider and more pronounced. If anything, their chiming, noisy guitars and messy arrangements only fit their highfalutin aspirations even better.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    For all of its melancholy, Such Pretty Forks feels personal but never profound. [May 2020, p.89]
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    But the real surprise is the music itself — the most head-spinning, heart-breaking, emotionally ambitious songs of her life.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Rossdale’s voice becomes a distraction when it overpowers the group’s wooshy guitar textures. But mostly Bush’s biggest sin is going back to the same well again and again hoping to find something new, something vital but coming up emptyhanded.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The 12 tracks on Gaslighter fall into easy, radio-friendly categories: empowerment anthem, cheeky ukulele kiss-off, minimalist protest song. Coupled with a long-overdue drop of the “Dixie” from their name, the arrangement dissolves most of the group’s lingering connections to their street-corner bluegrass origins.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The album shines brightest when Juice stops navel-gazing, when he tempers his fatalism with a sense of hope and togetherness, the yang to his depressive yin.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Their fifth album is pure misanthropic splendor. [Jul 2020, p.87]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The New Wave greats haven't sounded this raw and real since the early Eighties. [Jul 2020, p.87]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The highlights are when Nelson sings the songs of his old friends.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    As with Wainwright’s best works, it’s musical theater without the theater (remember, he once interpolated the theme from Phantom of the Opera on Release the Stars’ “Between My Legs”) and it comes with all of the good and bad that comes with stage drama.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Pop-punk trio deliver glittery hooks and raw feminine energy. [Jul 2020, p.87]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The Houston retro perfectionists create great global grooves with multilingual narratives. [Jul 2020, p.87]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With Jump Rope Gazers, the Beths — Stokes, Pearce, bassist Benjamin Sinclair and drummer Tristan Deck — prove that despite a global pandemic, it’s still possible to have a good time. They might not be excited, but we sure are.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    For the most part, Years finds Anderson at his most convincing, and moving, since his hit-making heyday. It’s the type of record that should cast his entire discography in a new light, an inspired offering that shows a forgotten legend pulling off a new trick just as effectively as his old ones.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Shoot for the Stars Aim for the Moon, Pop’s 19-track posthumous debut album, marks a dramatic expansion—and dilution—of his signature sound. 808 Melo, who produced about two-thirds of Pop’s music to date, is less of a defining presence here.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Moody and inviting. [Jun 2020, p.71]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The oft clunky Translation doubles down for a full-length that deserved EP treatment at best.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Teyana Taylor is a good singer, capable of shifting between a soft lilt on “Lowkey” and a strident punch on “We Got Love.” But she tends to sound like others, particularly Brandy. She hasn’t quite absorbed her influences into a vocal presence all her own.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Bigger Love, his seventh album, shows off the emerging subtlety of his musical craft and social messaging.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Decently fun results. [Jun 2020, p.71]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album is an immediate gem in their still-expanding catalog; it’s a resonant reflection on pain, depression, love and home that forsakes some of their big, drum-heavy pop leanings for a smoother, more inward experience.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Much of Lamb of God contains the sort of piledriving guitar riffs and Olympic-medal-worthy drumming the band has perfected over the last 20 years, making it easy for their less political fans to get in on the fun. That said, the group sounds best when they take musical risks.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is an album that proves something beautiful and enduring can come from even the most dire circumstances.