Rolling Stone's Scores

For 5,386 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 64% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Raw Power [Reissue]
Lowest review score: 0 Scream
Score distribution:
5386 music reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    For all their harmonic convolutions and tucked-away chorales, the arrangements exude modesty, without the arena-size inflation of Beatle-fan bands like Oasis...
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If you liked Tragic Kingdom, you should love Return of Saturn. And if you didn't, you should still love it.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Understandably, Reed's old fascination with sadomasochistic transcendence puts off those who don't swing that way at least a little. But the music on this record, its gorgeous part, could change that.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The album's producer, Gil Norton (whose crescendos for the Pixies were an alternative-rock cornerstone), has subtly filled out the sound of the Patti Smith Group without losing its handmade, jamming essence. Guitar tones resonate through the mix, and new lines snake through what used to be hollow space.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    While we await her next album of new material, due next winter, The Covers Record provides a stopgap fix of her unnerving, coldblooded voice and shaky acoustic guitar.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The arrangements typically blend lush waves of acoustic guitar with moody, cascading crescendos; it's strum-and-Drang best suited to rainy Sundays.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    NakedSelf finds him returning to the slow-burn industrial grind of his best work.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The album is exceedingly strange yet scrupulously crafted and intelligent. Chances are that Air, as they fashioned this fetching and jejune and weirdly disturbing score, were also having a small laugh.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The songs go back to the basics of would-be hit singles: riffs, hooks, bridges, choruses, often with voice and guitar tossing the same short phrase back and forth. Corgan hasn't radically changed his songwriting; he still goes for anthems, riff rockers and dirges. But there are no more fantasy epics or muses named Daphne, and there's hardly a keyboard to be heard. Guitars rule: distorted electrics and hard-strummed acoustics, sitarlike drones and orchestral reverberations, tolling Pink Floyd tones, and jabbing, wriggling leads, with plenty of echoes of the Cure and U2.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    What makes Two Against Nature work isn't its cerebral ellipticity but its stunning musical clarity.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    the more you listen to Pieces in a Modern Style, the more warmth and affection you hear... They're not meant for classical purists; they're charming little curios for anyone who's interested in the process of reinvention -- or in just chilling out.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Kaplan and Hubley sing their most confessional, intimate lyrics ever, over whispery guitars, brushed percussion, vibes and organ drones. It's a spell of blissful, psychedelic make-out music... these songs are great - heartfelt, rugged, melodically sumptuous enough to keep unfolding after dozens of spins, full of folk-rock flesh and blood.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Smith is incapable of writing five bad songs in a row; even hopeless records (1992's Wish) sport some saving grace ("Friday I'm in Love"). But he can write four bad songs in a row, and Cure albums tend to leak filler like an attic spilling insulation. The latest, Bloodflowers, is half dismissible droning, an unforgivable ratio considering it's only nine tracks long.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    [Lambchop vocalist Kurt] Wagner shares a sense of offbeat phrasing and doleful humor with his singer-songwriter friend Vic Chesnutt that is both profoundly Southern and affectingly universal.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The Night is the Boston band's most painstakingly layered and ambitious album, with cello, organ and oud expanding on the trio's original sax-y swagger.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The unabashedly crude results suggest a lackadaisical slant on the Beastie Boys' garage-funk jams.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Scattered about this engaging, enigmatic disc is a bit of Dusty in Memphis, a touch of Bobbie Gentry's swamp-country persona, a hint of Prince's instinct for making voices and rhythms sound positively libidinous, and a whole lot of Shelby Lynne.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For all Beck lifts from the Seventies, the album never sounds like a period piece; there's always something extra in the mix, stray elements that are both goofy and strangely apropos.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    has the talent, not to mention the fame and fortune, to seclude herself from the big bad world ahead of her. But Fiona II makes you hope that she'll find a way to use her talent as a connection to the world instead. Because she's an artist who deserves a shot at growing up.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Rockwell and Merriweather may never sashay down Paris runways, but their How's Your Girl? has a hot style all its own.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Rock that feels like techno ... Gorgeous and wasted, THE CONTINO SESSIONS sounds like blues for space cowboys.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    That's the tenor of One Part Lullaby, a CD that takes sardonic low-fi minimalism and makes it into transcendentally tinny pop. Lullaby lilts and entices without losing its smirk.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Merritt's compositions have a tossed-off, barely produced quality and are held together by sturdily constructed melodies that hark back to Eighties synth poppers like Orchestral Manoeuvers in the Dark.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Basement Jaxx refine their broad influences into a creative energy you can feel: The art of their noise supples as much dance motivation as their beats.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Another baffling, winning, neopsychedelic recording.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The ebb and flow of eighteen concise, contrasting cuts writes a story about Moby's beautifully conflicted interior world while giving the outside planet beats and tunes on which to groove.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The Georgia collective's second album is pop at its most playful and the avant-garde at its cuddliest -- a four-act, twenty-seven-song fantasy trip in which structure and chaos keep leapfrogging each other.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    13
    Their sloppiest, most playful set yet.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Their specialty is an undulating trance throb that shimmers with shades of rock, contemporary symphonics, dub, disco, house, spoken word, whatever. The result still sounds like Underworld, and the fiftieth play sounds better than the fifth.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Keep It Like a Secret is tightly wound clang, effectively understated in spots.