Rolling Stone's Scores

For 5,384 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 64% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Raw Power [Reissue]
Lowest review score: 0 Scream
Score distribution:
5384 music reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Their fourth record lacks the innocent fun of their first hits. [Apr 2020, p.87]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Where Strokes albums since 2006’s First Impressions of Earth have felt grudging and defensive in their theoretical approach to the band’s cultural and career position, this time out the mood is less constricted.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    This charming man's bowshots at English society can get repetitive. [Apr 2020, p.87]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Even with a bruised heart, he's a charmer. [Apr 2020, p.87]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Sweet, solid collection about fatherhood and quitting cigarettes, sounding like the National. [Apr 2020, p.87]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Classic gestures are all over Southside, though Hunt thankfully has no interest in doing something so straightforward.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It Is What It Is, is just as daring in its musical reach, and its pairing of goofy and gutting [as 2017's Drunk].
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    McBryde’s second major-label release, Never Will, is just as daring and deep, sometimes deceptively so [as Girl Going Nowhere].
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The music turns much darker Ghosts VI, which, by proxy, makes it the more interesting of the two. ... Unlike the first Ghosts collection, these albums feel like distinct artistic statements.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The songs are spacious with gentle buzzing, humming, and exhaling drones that slowly evolve, complementing often pretty piano music.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Glaspy doesn’t tear down so much expand and build upon the warm Seventies folk-rock of her wonderful 2016 debut Emotions + Math, incorporating drum loops and processed vocals into an effortless mix of swooping indie-pop (“Without Him”), industrial noise (“What’s the Point”) and Ben Folds-piano sing-alongs (“Vicious”).
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Future Nostalgia is a breathtakingly fun, cohesive and ambitious attempt to find a place for disco in 2020. Incredibly, Lipa is successful: the upbeat album that she decided to release a week earlier than planned is the perfect balm for a stressful time.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Yo Hago Lo Que Me Da La Gana (or I Do Whatever I Want) convenes a family reunion of his favorite rappers and reggaetoneros to produce a genre-promiscuous work of reggaeton a la marquesina: a more street-savvy form of reggaeton once deemed so risqué that it was criminalized and relegated to garage parties across Puerto Rico throughout the Nineties.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There’s a new richness to Crutchfield’s voice that smooths out the emotional extremities.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    After Hours certainly has its share of pity-partying. But there’s also a vulnerability that goes beyond the usual too-beautiful-for-the-world sulking. ... After Hours is one of the smoothest cocoons he’s spun.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There’s surprisingly little filler on these thirteen songs, barring a few missteps like “Bragger,” which lands in an uninteresting netherworld between country and pop. More interesting is when Ballerini explores the social dynamics of that same netherworld.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Spanning 10 pigment-themed tracks, Colores is a sophisticated show of Balvin’s sonic palette.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Lee’s sound design—the rush of Uzi getting sucked into a portal, the hum of the spaceship engine, the unsettling, pulsating rumble coming from the great beyond—co-exists seamlessly with the album’s production. It creates narrative tension and helps create a broader cosmic context for his sex marathons and shopping sprees, for the great eccentric force with which he raps and sings.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Gigaton is a testament to how Pearl Jam’s own deeply held dissatisfaction still burns brighter than ever.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Suga might sound like a moodier big sister to Tina Snow or Hot Girl Meg. But as the new songs show, Megan at her most vulnerable is still tough as a tank.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Rose's ace narrative writing occasionally takes a back seat to her neon keyboards and dance beats, but when she stumbles upon a fine groove, it's irresistible. [Mar 2020, p.91]
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Mostly acoustic folk set, indebted to faves like Fairport Convention and Bert Jansch, and full of fireside beauty. [Mar 2020, p.91]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As great as their Nineties high points, a hazy, globalist British rock that's loose and optimistically eclectic. [Mar 2020, p.87]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Settles on muscular, tasteful adult pop that's often autobiographical. [Mar 2020, p.91]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Leans on her singer-songwriter side. [Mar 2020, p.91]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    My Turn succeeds as a showcase of Lil Baby’s talent, but it still feels flat on due to its excessive length, the fact that every song is almost exactly three minutes, and the way it recycles 808 patterns and harmonic structures.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The effortlessness with which the Secret Sisters articulate their musical ambitions places Saturn Return among recent country-roots gems from songwriters like Jason Isbell and Pistol Annies. If working through their struggles has been a strange process, the wait was more than worth it.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Color Theory could have been a true indie-rock stunner if more of its songs hit with the same individually distinct charge as the ones on her debut. Still, Allison’s nostalgic sadness suggests a bright musical future.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, the music doesn’t do the lyrics any favors, a real surprise coming from an artists whose earlier LPs established her as one of indie-pop’s sharpest melodists.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Unlike the band’s recent Faith and Grace collection, which crams the Stax material onto a one-disc compilation, Come Go With Me offers the first-ever complete portrait of the group’s most dynamic, and in some ways, most turbulent, period.