Rolling Stone's Scores

For 5,384 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 64% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Raw Power [Reissue]
Lowest review score: 0 Scream
Score distribution:
5384 music reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Their 10th album sounds as though they had been sitting on it since [1994]. [Jan 2020, p.84]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    James Alex re-ups the Replacements' underdog thrash for a new generation, and he's so on point. [Jan 2020, p.84]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Rare is shockingly, and beautifully, upbeat.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    here aren’t many behind-the-scenes outtakes, only a few demos and jams from around The Division Bell, including a stripped-down more dour-sounding “High Hopes.” ... The box set attempts to make up for this with odds and ends like interviews, standalone reels of the projections they cast on the circular screen, replica tour programs and a lyric book. The accouterments are all well considered and, like the concert films and albums, feel very “Pink Floyd” (it’s always nice to see the band’s trippy, Hipgnosis art printed well). But it only makes you want more
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s a streamlined, party-ready, primary-colors take on the enduring concept of the rock & roll starman. It’s also as much as fun as anyone short of Bruno Mars is having with a band these days.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An album where she keeps finding ways to give her artistry a new edge.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    WHO
    The band may be only half the Who they were when they formed, but Who is worthy of the Who name.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    None of the bonus songs are necessarily better than the ones that made the cut on 1999, but they show just how curious he was at the time, trying out new and different ideas, musical themes he would still be exploring in the decades that followed. ... As with the Purple Rain box set a couple years ago, this macro look at 1999 shows not just Prince’s genius but the breadth of his brilliance at the time.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s a band whose great talent has always been its aspirational one-world melodies, now sounding much more like the world.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For all of his vigor for partnership, is a solitary classicist, a singer-songwriter wrestling with the dynamics of desire and emotional commitment. Hyperspace is grounded in that realism.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Thanks for the Dance is a surprise, a sort of séance as shiva, a magnificent parting shot that’s also that exceptionally rare thing — a posthumous work as alive, challenging, and essential as anything issued in the artist’s lifetime.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s good to hear the grain of James’ voice minus its usual cloak of reverb; his writing’s passionate, and the orchestrations show smarts and wit.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Everybody’s Everything doesn’t offer a clearer picture of his emotional burden, but rather exists as a lasting reminder of the massive star he might have been.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The reissue may not be a treasure trove of unheard material, but the gems that echo the sounds of the American South are comforting and familiar. And that’s not a bad thing.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Consider Courage to be Dion’s version of Cher’s Believe: an album that arrived at exactly the right time and proved to a new generation that she’s worth revisiting and recognizing as a diva very capable of keeping up with the times.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Its first half is devoted to the biggest chunk of original instrumental music he’s released, and it comes with lovely, welcome surprises. ... Not every track hits hard, but the “Vocal Suite” still feels like a cohesive album, and its punchiest tracks take many involved to a level they haven’t reached in years.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Several releases later, Elverum is still meditating on grief and grace with poignancy on this hyper-literal album.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The sound’s kaleidoscopic.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A fresh listen to No Other, Clark’s lone Asylum album, reminds you both of its beauty and its occasional more frustrating aspects. The songs, which stretch out to as long as eight minutes, aren’t played as much as unfurled. ... Shorn of the choir that appears on many of its songs, the outtakes are vital for the way they allow us to zero in on Clark’s singing. It’s easy to forget how robust a vocalist Clark could be
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Combs’ second full-length, then, sounds less like an album and more like a collection of singles that will be crowding country radio for the next two years.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    With its sturdy songcraft and mostly straightforward arrangements, Two Hands is not a revelation so much as a reinforcement and welcome reminder of Big Thief’s greatest strengths.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The results are, naturally, mostly great. There perhaps isn’t enough of the rapper as one would want – many of the songs are short, the album loaded with guests – but there are moments where it feels like one of the most beloved rap groups in history are picking up right where they left off.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Earl’s choose-your-own-adventure raps belie the precision of his lyrics. His dense words-per-second ratio, as well as the fluid, associative logic that guides Feet of Clay, makes each song appear as a bottled capsule of unfiltered stream-of-consciousness that spills out of him like water from an Artesian well.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A new, six-disc anniversary box set offers a holistic look at the album with demos, a completely remixed version of the record, and a live recording.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s the sound of a freewheeling star at the top of her game, reimagining rock history in her own platinum image.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    More than 50 years later, the fuzzed-out riffs and mellow harmonies are still intact, the lyrics just as heartfelt.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s rare to hear Dylan sound like a fan trying to be a peer, but that’s what’s evident here. Those sessions serve as the core of Travelin’ Thru, Dylan’s 15th “Bootleg Series” release, but since the Man in Black is spry and dominant throughout — he’s the true star here — it could also be a new entry in his own Bootleg Series.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The plaintive, direct singing mode is West’s best delivery vehicle across the album. The rapping is uniformly lackluster when not delivered by one of the brothers Thornton in their return as legendary rap duo Clipse.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    With its carefully-crafted sequencing and seamless interludes, Kiwanuka feels like a proper old-fashioned album constructed as such, with some of its brightest highlights buried deep into the record’s latter half.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    No Home Record finds Gordon stepping out in search of life after Sonic Youth, musically and perhaps lyrically, and the ride can be pretty mesmerizing.