Rolling Stone's Scores

For 5,658 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 64% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Magic
Lowest review score: 0 Know Your Enemy
Score distribution:
5658 music reviews
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album hits its strongest points when Morby opens himself up to reckless abandon, stripping himself of the introspective pretenses of soul-searching and instead embracing the unpredictable chaos of life and all its imperfection.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Kendrick has never been one for subtlety, and the vulnerability at the core of Mr. Morale & The Big Steppers brings out moments of his reflexive overreach.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    He’s pulled off the neat trick of making his music at once elegant and more refined but also warmer and more intimate — the polished-marble smoothness of Steely Dan with the generosity of an Al Green or Yo La Tengo record.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    By and large, it lives up to the legend, or at least what anyone would have wanted it to be. The you-are-there ambience of what we’d already heard runs throughout the entire album, as does the same bravado and ferocity, whether the band is rolling out “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” for the hundredth time or a cover of bluesman Big Maceo’s “Worried Life Blues.”
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A Light for Attracting Attention contains some of the songwriters’ most easily enjoyable music in years.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Dance Fever may be Welch’s most ecstatically extra work yet. [May 2022, p.75]
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A concise and seamlessly flowing collection of insurrectionary rhymes and propulsive beats by one of rap’s most heralded duos.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Rather than feeding into speculation about the ever-expanding scale of the genre and what peak he’s out to conquer next, he chooses to lean back and have fun with a loose, leisurely set of 23 songs, his longest tracklist ever.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There are magical moments on Come Home the Kids Miss You to be found amidst a primal need to sex his female fans.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The svelte, 34-minute Dropout Boogie — which comes out the day before the 20th anniversary of their first album — keeps things similarly crunchy.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    All told, the singer-songwriter’s latest is a testament to her dedication to songcraft and an impressive mid-career statement on restlessness, contentment and everything in between.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    WE
    All of these gestures are deeply in earnest, and some of them even feel earned. But it’s hard not to hear We as the sound of a band hopefully setting things back in order, with better adventures to come.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    As warm and soulful as ever. [May 2022, p.79]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Their most sonically surprising - full of brash lust and tender beauty. [May 2022, p.79]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    I Never Liked You is no DS2, but it has a compositional sweep often absent from his work. Most importantly, it’s an album with layers that’s more engaging than recent fare such as 2019’s appealing yet boilerplate Future Hndrxx Presents: The Wizrd and Save Me EP; and 2020’s one-two punch of desultory hive-bait, High Off Life and Pluto x Baby Pluto, the latter with Lil Uzi Vert.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There are numerous nods to classic rock throughout. ... Lambert’s more adventurous side comes out on “I’ll Be Loving You,” which combines echoing piano notes and thick coils of electric guitar into a booming anthem that’s more Arcade Fire than Alan Jackson. ... The LP’s final track, “Carousel,” is a breathtaking ballad of trapeze-artist romance and long-buried secrets.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Leray gives a vivid performance throughout Trendsetter’s ups and downs, even if a distinct portrait of her “pain” lies just out of focus.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s Almost Dry, Pusha’s fourth solo album, adds levity to his troubled-conscious colloquies, presenting a well-balanced portrait of a complex man with some serious burdens on his heart.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What could have been a tasteful salute becomes a record that’s bristlingly, viscerally alive; it’s like a ride in a classic old car with long-gone shock absorbers.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    He stretches out and gets comfortable on his loosey-goosiest jams to date, handing out 74 minutes of mellow wisdom off the dome. He’s wisely stopped searching for the next level up, focusing instead on the beautifully unfocused be-here-now beatitude that’s always been his greatest gift.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    When Fivivo brags, “This is the town of the big drip, smooth talk, Milly Rock, Shmoney Dance, Woo Walk,” the vibes feel electric. B.I.B.L.E., for the most part, proves that he’s about keeping that same energy.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Chloë takes many twists and turns around the movie set, pulling off the impossible feat of making sure its mellowness never grows tiresome.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There are a lot of great things happening on this record — trickier flows, piercing beats, and acerbic writing — that make it feel significant. But if you suspect it isn’t, I know how you got there.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Across Ivory, Apollo slips from English to Spanish, singing in whatever language best serves the music. He eludes labels when it comes to his identity and sexuality; instead, he often lets the music speak for itself. He doesn’t hold back in his lyrics.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Guided by Syd’s laudable ear and angelic voice, Broken Hearts Club succeeds in sewing a narrative of love grown and wilted.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The extras are a feast for serious Pavement lunatics.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album is packed with hilariously nasty kiss-offs like “Piece of Shit” and “Ur Mum” — it’s got hooks for days, cheek for weeks.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Familia is as raw as Cabello has ever been. She successfully laces the sounds of her Latina roots into a record that lyrically rips out the pages of her life’s diary — all its heartbreak, drama, and self-doubt — for the entire world to see.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, Fear of the Dawn — the first of two records White will release this year — feels like a hodgepodge of good intentions and so-so execution.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The result is vintage RHCP: a jammy, melodic effort that blends the wavy reflections of their 1999 triumph, Californication, with the expansive rock of Stadium Aracadium.