RPG Site's Scores

  • Games
For 516 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 41% higher than the average critic
  • 8% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 74
Highest review score: 100 Xenoblade Chronicles 3
Lowest review score: 20 Best Friend Forever
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 23 out of 516
517 game reviews
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Front Mission 1st: Remake is a good time, if not quite a great one. For all its bumps in the road, and in a strange way, perhaps in part because of them, there is immense satisfaction in clearing each stage. Regardless, I’m glad the series is getting some love again, and I’m pretty pleased with Forever Entertainment’s crack at things overall. If their quality of work is maintained going forward, I suspect we’re in for some real treats with the second and third installments.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Crisis Core - Final Fantasy VII Reunion is one of Square Enix’s better remaster offerings and is generally a pleasure to play. The responsiveness and tight controls, along with the new quality-of-life additions, make combat a thrill to take part in. The visuals breathe extra life into an already interesting world, and I never got sick of watching the redone summon attacks. The story of Zack, while tragic, is still filled with moments of some brevity and intrigue, thanks in new small part to Zack simply being a wonderful character. My gripes aside, I am thrilled that whole new generations of players can once again enjoy this prequel and see Zack’s story again after such a long time. Crisis Core - Final Fantasy VII Reunion is a must-play for anyone that loves Final Fantasy VII.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Marvel’s Midnight Suns is an awesome tactical RPG experience. There are some aspects that have dampened my experience here and there, yet its most important element kept me enthralled throughout my entire playthrough. This is a game that shouldn’t be missed by strategy game fans, though I admit that the appeal of Midnight Suns depends on if your palate is open to card-based games. There is no denying that a significant chunk of Midnight Suns revolves around unpacking, upgrading, and unleashing cards to wreak havoc on foes and if that’s something that doesn’t make you turn away immediately, then this is certainly worth your time.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    These are games that anyone that has ever considered themselves a Pokemon fan deserves to play; but not today, and not in this state. One can only hope that a day will come when that recommendation can come easily; I’d like nothing more than to be able to do so.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    These are games that anyone that has ever considered themselves a Pokemon fan deserves to play; but not today, and not in this state. One can only hope that a day will come when that recommendation can come easily; I’d like nothing more than to be able to do so.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Tactics Ogre: Reborn is largely an excellent modern version of the classic strategy RPG. There are a myriad of improvements and enhancements to make it the most user-friendly version yet without compromising its difficulty. It is sometimes a delightfully brutal experience that pushed me to think carefully about my every move, though a lot of the gameplay alterations introduced in Tactics Ogre: Reborn didn’t jive with me for the most part. The primary suspects are the universally inflated stat values across the board and the new temporary stat increase cards among other nitpicks. Everything that I love about Tactics Ogre outside of its battle system remains intact with the branching narrative system, the ways you can recruit characters, and the overall presentation of one of the most interesting narratives in video game history.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Star Ocean: The Divine Force impressed me far more than I was expecting it to. I was hoping for an experience that wasn’t as dull as the previous game, and I came away with fond memories and hope for the series again. It doesn’t quite reach the highs of the first few Star Ocean games, but it easily is my favorite of the more modern entries of the franchise. I once again look forward to sailing through the ocean of stars.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    I come away from Batora: Lost Haven greatly disappointed. With tedious dialogue, a mediocre narrative, and thin gameplay structure, Batora is only salvaged by its adequate combat, respectable art, and a mercifully short runtime.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Asterigos: Curse of the Stars is a better experience than I expected it to be. Despite its shortcomings, such as excessive dialogue, translation oddities, quest issues, and some awkward area design, for those looking for a comfortable action RPG with a satisfying story & competent combat, Asterigos deserves a chance.
    • tbd Metascore
    • Critic Score
    In my preview from PAX West, I described Lost Eidolons as “if Dragon Age and Fire Emblem had a child” and after sinking a lot more time into it, I still stand by that remark. It’s an impressive first foray for indie Ocean Drive Studio that has resulted in a title that will speak to SRPG fans and intrigue those who are more allured by more gear and stat-forward RPGs. While it may not land all the time with too many loading screens, a weaker narrative, and character models lacking emotion, thanks to the richness of its mechanics and solid tactical experience, the experience is still one that will appeal to tactical diehards. [Early Access Provisional Score = 70]
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    I really wanted to like The Outbound Ghost. Usually, even with disappointing games, I find one feature or facet to rally behind even if the whole package is ultimately underwhelming. However, in this case I struggle to find a single thing to highlight. The Outbound Ghost is a pale imitation that I don't recommend playing.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Fire Emblem Warriors: Three Hopes is a great piece of expanded lore for people who loved Fire Emblem: Three Houses. It has a new and interesting take on the story of Fire Emblem: Three Houses, and it expands on the relationships of these established characters. It also makes a number of improvements regarding performance and graphics, which is a promising sign as Koei Tecmo continues to improve how well their games run on the console. Whether it's just for reuniting with your favourite house for 40 hours or taking on the entire three-route adventure, Fire Emblem Warriors: Three Hopes should satisfy your journey back to Fodlan.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Despite its various shortcomings, I came away from The DioField Chronicle satisfied with its uniquely refreshing take on strategy RPGs. DioField's storytelling style was specifically a highlight for me, and its take on tactical combat offers something different from its contemporaries. While its mission design, sidequest variety, and some skill systems hold it back, DioField is worth a try for anyone looking for something just a bit different in their tactical RPGs.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Valkyrie Elysium is an okay game with a fun battle system. Its biggest strength is that it’s fun to play when there are enemies on-screen. Everything else about it is relatively lackluster. This new take on the Valkyrie series is a solid gameplay foundation while leaving a lot of room for improvement in many other areas. Still, I think the developers at Soleil have done a decent job as newcomers taking their own interpretation of the series. I don’t think I’d want Valkyrie Elysium to completely overtake the Valkyrie Profile series moving forward, though I’d be happy with a peaceful co-existence as each strives to improve themselves - given that Square Enix greenlights more Valkyrie titles, of course.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Voice of Cards: The Beasts of Burden is an overall more streamlined experience than the other entries. With the frequency of releases in the series compared to the number of improvements made, the cards are starting to wear a bit thin. My playtime sat at around eleven hours, including filling in the whole map, clearing every difficulty in the mini-game, and doing half a quest line. This could perhaps be the shortest of the (so far) three games, and I feel if you’re going to make three entries in less than a year, paring things down is probably not the best approach. While I’m a fan of these games, I do hope there’s a bit more of a break before they go fish another one out. It’s still an enjoyable game but this third entry sits distinctly in third place to me.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Considering its availability on modern platforms, The Legend of Heroes: Trails from Zero is potentially the best and easiest starting point currently for players to easily jump into this behemoth of a series. With this release, it is the easiest of the games to play while spoiling the least amount of events from other games and also having a solid and slightly more modern feel to it. I fell even more in love with the SSS after finally being able to see their beginnings and experience the start of their stories together and their home of Crossbell. I loved exploring the hills of Amorica and the mines of Maize, heading off the goons of Revache while befriending the gangs of the Downtown district. I loved reading every witty response from each treasure chest I opened (seriously, after opening a chest, check it again for some great messages and puns), and each new reveal I uncovered. Having primarily played this on my Steamdeck, it led to many late nights and hushed gasps as I tried not to wake my wife after a shocking twist, a feeling that Falcom seems to have mastered.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Made in Abyss: Binary Star Falling into Darkness is certainly not a game for everyone. It is a challenging balancing act between being faithful to Made in Abyss and being a “fun” video game. It does an admirable job in implementing the “systems” and “rules” of Made in Abyss’s world into a game, but the overall result just feels underwhelming in its presentation and execution. Fans of Made in Abyss will enjoy Binary Star Falling into Darkness if they are seeking the hardcore survival aspect of being a Cave Raider in that world, but it has little to offer for complete newcomers.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    I come away from Steelrising feeling satisfied but not enamored. It's an adequate foray into the Souls-like space, and it incorporates its own traversal gimmicks well enough, but lackluster quests, boss encounters, and level design hold it back from being an exceptional entry in the genre.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Despite its flaws, SD Gundam Battle Alliance provides a fairly unique experience in just being a challenging game in general. This is one of the few games in Gundam that heavily encourages multiplayer co-op. I hope it finds a healthy community in all the platforms it is released on, because this is not a great experience if you are intending to play it only alone. There are certainly problems on a fundamental level besides its oddly tuned balance; the AI partners and camera often perform poorly, while some of its environments are straight up borderline visually unnavigable. Yet, I am left impressed with how technical the gameplay is and how carefully Artdink designed the game’s framework to emphasize teamwork and synergy above all throughout fun Gundam crossover stages. It’s not perfect, but I am thankful that this kind of game can still exist.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    For a game that places so much weight on its cast and writing , Digimon Survive struggles to engage with poor characterization and weak storytelling.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Depending on your perspective, Soul Hackers 2 can be seen as a happy medium between dungeon crawler, RPG, and social simulation. Or it can be seen as being in a sort of no man's land, where it incorporates elements of each while not quite excelling at anything. I come away feeling more toward the latter here, where no singular element of the game really managed to excite me beyond base satisfaction. Soul Hackers 2 is an adequate, experimental Megaten entry with some bright spots, but it doesn't quite all come together as well as I hoped it would.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Though not a lot of the time spent felt like I was really playing an RPG, I enjoyed the slightly over seven hours I spent playing. The focus of this game is largely on style, but it’s not entirely devoid of substance. It is however held back a little by some annoying controls and Kenta’s railroading. RPG Time: The Legend of Wright is nonetheless an enjoyable journey both inside and outside of the pages.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even if there isn't any real reason to continue playing the game after the credits roll, it's hard to deny that I had a wonderful time with Little Noah; and in a sea of similar games that aim to challenge players to perform their absolute best, sometimes it's nice to just sit down and play a game that aims to make the players feel powerful. Little Noah: Scion of Paradise strikes that balance without making the game feel unengaging, and that's by no means an easy feat. Perhaps Cygames' planned updates will offer something for those players that might still ache for a real challenge, but even if they don't end up delivering on that promise it's almost impossible to avoid falling for Little Noah's charms.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Though it borrows and evolves many of its foundations from other previous titles, Xenoblade Chronicles 3 finds numerous ways to distinguish itself from the rest. Its battle system has an ocean of depth, but it is genuinely fun to experiment with all the options it provides to players. I think the title is perfectly fine as a standalone experience to newcomers, but returning Xenoblade players will certainly be rewarded in several ways. For those that have stuck with Executive Director Tetsuya Takahashi’s grand Xeno project since Xenogears, there are numerous winks and nods in store for them too. I strongly believe that Xenoblade Chronicles 3 is a modern JRPG masterpiece.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The game didn’t wear out its welcome with my playthrough, taking me about 23 hours to get all the endings. Live A Live brings with it some of the best qualities a game can have, a sense of discovery and adventure. With the option to play some chapters completely differently, or tackle on extra hard enemies, this is definitely a game I’ll replay, sooner than later.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Whereas Rise left me wholly disappointed the more I looked back on the game, it feels like the few issues that I have with Sunbreak are likely to be improved upon as the expansion continues to receive updates – and it’s not like the current state of the game is bad by any stretch of the imagination. I could nitpick about how it adds less monsters to Rise than Iceborne did to World, but that feels unfair when you look at what else the expansion brings to the table, as well as what’s ahead. That’s not to say that I’m judging Sunbreak for what it can be, but rather as some reassurance for anyone that might be heading into the expansion feeling a bit underwhelmed by what’s been shown. Sunbreak is already one of the best expansions that the series has had, and it’s only going to rise up that list from here.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Just like its predecessor, AI: The Somnium Files – nirvanA Initiative is full of heart, hilariously self-aware, and reflective on the style of writing that built the foundation that built the Somnium Files series. Both AI games are deeply personal, subversive, and reflective works, some of my favorite games in the genre. Now that we have one miracle sequel that ended up great, I could go for another one in a few years.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic 2 - The Sith Lords feels and plays (mostly) great on the Switch. After revisiting the first game last year, being able to continue on with the nostalgia here was a pleasure. Aspyr has once again done a good job reintroducing classic Star Wars games to brand new audiences with these ports, and honestly, this has become my preferred way to play Knights of the Old Republic 1 and 2.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Coromon is a game filled with potential but past sinking sands and perplexing puzzles it starts to fall flat. Fans of the genre will be delighted by the levels of customization thanks to the potential system and easy skill switching. Though, once you beat the roughly twenty-three or so hour campaign you'll find little to do. While some elements are stated to be getting worked on, two months after release, the game is still the same. Hopefully those who are waiting on the delayed Switch and mobile release will get them at the same time as any major updates to the game. For the PC and budget gamer, however, this is still a fine choice, and there is an accessible demo letting you play the start of the game. The shake-ups do let Coromon stand on its own and create an enjoyable experience, but it could’ve evolved to be something a little more.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Elex II is a disappointing game that fails to build on the potential of the original. While at some moments it manages to capture some of the same strengths, it feels like a poorly implemented retread in several ways. Slight improvements to combat don't make up for a less interesting story, worse characters, weak quest design, and a stark lack of polish.

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