RPGamer's Scores

  • Games
For 948 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 27% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 67% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Persona 4 Golden
Lowest review score: 20 Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles: The Crystal Bearers
Score distribution:
952 game reviews
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The Hand of Merlin is a quick tactical roguelite game with enough otherworldly energy packed into it that causes the short completion time to breeze by. With each run being only a few hours, players have the opportunity to try out new combinations that combine classes with various abilities to find new ways to create unstoppable machines of destruction. Abominations need this level of dedication because one slip up and they’ll tear through players quickly, create a test of player’s strengths and strategies to see if they can succeed. The game holds nothing back in presentation, including an addictive genre blending soundtrack as well as a ton of depth to its lore and world building. Fans of tactical games and roguelites should check it out.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Both fans of Star Wars and RPGamers will find many likable features in Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic II: The Sith Lords, from the way each character feels fleshed out to how the dialogue choices impact the destiny of the galaxy. However, in its current state, the game is barely recommendable since crashes will be present constantly. Some polish would greatly benefit the game, and with the announcement of a remake of the first entry, it is inevitable to wonder if this one will get the same treatment. I hope it does because most of the issues with the game can be addressed and the outcome could be an outstanding game instead of an average one.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    I’ve long been a fan of games that adopt Soulslike elements into their design, even the 2D variety. If done well, even these games’ inherent limitations can be overcome in sterling ways. Watcher Chronicles, however, doesn’t ever quite put its best foot forward. Combat works well enough, but the clean and colorful art style definitely won’t be to everyone’s liking. Seeing as there’s virtually no story to speak of and exploration never so much as approaches being interesting, it’s safe to say that we’ve seen other games nail the basics at least as well while wrapping them up in a more pleasing package. Watcher Chronicles may scratch an itch for those in need, but ultimately fails to leave a lasting impression.
    • tbd Metascore
    • Critic Score
    It’s not trying to be big, flashy, or grandiose. There is no greater message it is trying to convey. It is simply a game wherein cute puppy dogs run around blowing stuff up with machine guns and missile launchers, and that is all it needs to be.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Touken Ranbu Warriors doesn’t feel like a great showcase for either property. The characters are engaging enough, but it fails to make a case for diving deeper into the fight against a faceless HRA that seems to be causing havoc just because. Meanwhile, the simplified variation of Warriors gameplay doesn’t have enough depth or challenge to be at all compelling. The idea of getting the series together appeared to be a good one, but the execution simply cuts too much away.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    On paper, RPG Time: The Legend of Wright is a dazzling love letter to gamers and creators alike. Boasting a unique art style and an audacious commitment to its core gimmick, this is very much a title for gamers that remember doodling in their notebooks all those years ago, dreaming of their own creations. While gorgeous to look at, the game suffers from a bit of an identity crisis, as it is overstuffed with a few too many disparate gameplay systems. However, even those who do not find the gameplay compelling may appreciate the sheer ambition of Kenta’s tale.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Final Fantasy VI Pixel Remaster brings the definitive version of a 28-year-old game to today’s audiences by looking at modern enhancements and embracing the past. The spirit of the beloved original is honored here, with love of the game showing in every wisp of smoke or hiss from a strike of thunder. Final Fantasy VI Pixel Remaster doesn’t play exactly like Final Fantasy VI did in 1994 when I first played it, but the experience of this Pixel Remaster certainly looks, sounds, and feels like it did all those years ago. Unlike that old sweatshirt from college, this always fits. That’s the best kind of nostalgia, isn’t it?
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Though it departs from the previous two games in the series, Seven Pirates H still manages to carve out its own niche in the adult-minded gaming space. While the differences between past games and this one may seem jarring at first, overall many of the gameplay tweaks come as welcome changes. Just consider whether it’s worth trying to explain the Chest Growth system to your seatmate on that next plane ride.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Rising takes players to averagetown, population snoozefest and it doesn’t ever get exciting, even after its twenty-hour completion time. While it offers players a beautiful presentation and some ear candy tunes, these elements cannot help elevate Rising as being any more than a fetch-quest-heavy experience with little to no payoff. If I wanted to play Chores: The RPG, I’d just clean my house, because doing that offers considerably more tangible benefits than playing this game to completion did.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Loot River has a lot going for it with precise fluid combat and methodical progression. It has had some technically hiccups, many of which have been ironed out with quick fixes, though their presence in the original release is a disappointment. The progression feels stunted with only a slight variation to each map to keep players coming back for more. Loot River‘s mileage will vary, with refreshing timing-based combat it can feel like a fun distraction or a listless drift down the river.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There’s just not enough in the overall package to make tERRORbane an enjoyable experience, especially for those looking for something more than flat parody.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite its repetitive nature, there is so much to love about Nobody Saves the World. Not only is it a great experience to share with a friend, but it’s a memorable one overall. Drinkbox Studios has crafted such a fun and challenging experience that definitely made me a glutton for punishment. There is so much creativity throughout the game from its overall aesthetic to its unique take on action RPG combat. Nobody Saves the World deserves so much praise for everything it accomplishes and is a must-play for anyone who loves crazy apocalyptic settings filled with questionable but loveable weirdos.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Triangle Strategy has hit the ground running, setting a new standard for tactical RPGs. With a nearly perfect conviction system that adds spice to every conversation, it rewards players who take the time to explore the world and its inhabitants. The game is breathtaking to view as well with care added to everything. It features characters that grow and evolve, sometimes in unexpected ways, with the world around them. Add to that an amazingly deep, strategic combat system that allows every character to be the star of a fight while being less useful in others and there’s a lot of variety in how to approach every scenario. Fans of deep lore, choice-driven storytelling, and plenty of strategy will be enchanted by how their epic unfolds in this tactical masterpiece.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    13 Sentinels: Aegis Rim is a gem with fully justified award wins in 2020, and the Nintendo Switch port is a very welcome opportunity for more players to dive into its fantastic sci-fi story. While it’s light on the action, it’s a wholehearted recommendation for those who enjoy narrative adventures and RPGs in general.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s hard to review Elden Ring without being comparative; that’s because Elden Ring is an evolutionary step, not a revolutionary one, and one can’t help but see how it’s built on what came before. Here is a massive undertaking of a game, not for the sake of chasing trends but as the natural progression of the style the company has been fostering for over a decade. It’s amazing how smoothly the transition to open world was and how much of the Souls identity is still present. In the short time since its release, it has already left a cultural mark, no doubt a result of the game’s increased approachability. Even after sifting past all the hype and grandiosity, there’s still an excellent game left and Elden Ring is a clear showcase of FromSoftware’s outstanding expertise in the field. Elden Ring really is just that good.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Coromon is a vintage monster-catching game with a retro art style. It has no shame in making clear its source of inspiration, but at the cost of lacking relevant new ideas. Nevertheless, exploring this world as well as catching and training monsters is definitely worth the 30-hour journey. It’s an easy recommendation for those who are eager to play a traditional monster-taming RPG.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Dark Deity feels like a love letter to Fire Emblem in so many ways, and while it does have elements that make it stand on its own, it’s not fully there yet. That being said, there’s a lot to like in Dark Deity, with an addictive gameplay loop and ensuring tons of possibilities for customization to make its gameplay shine. I was so pleasantly surprised with Dark Deity on numerous occasions and I am eager to see if Sword & Axe LLC can iron out the kinks. Any strategy fan looking for a good challenge, interesting gameplay, and fun and customizable cast of characters should find Dark Deity up their alley. Just maybe wait for a patch on the Switch in hopes that the performance issues get addressed.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Despite its issues and a perplexing plot that fails to answer nearly all of its pressing questions, ANNO: Mutationem has the makings of a strong ongoing property. The mixture of 2D and 3D works nicely with its visual style, and it establishes Ann Flores as a strong protagonist well worth spending more time with. As it currently is, ANNO: Mutationem is a solid but not spectacular title and should be able to establish a fan base, with the scope to expand it in the future.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Atelier Sophie 2: Alchemist of the Mysterious Dream would seem to be the very definition of a sequel which no one wanted. The Mysterious trilogy as a whole received a mixed reception, and not much more was expected of this. And yet, what we’ve got here is a well-crafted narrative in an original setting with a cast of properly developed characters and a plot that actually knows where to find the beat. When I started this game, I was not expecting to find the best Atelier game of its generation, but the development team at Gust has proven with Sophie 2 that they can learn from experience, leveling up in knowledge and skill just as the alchemists do to provide a more polished product.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ghostwire: Tokyo is a fascinating and very worthwhile new title from Tango Gameworks. While there’s plenty of room for improvement in the main narrative and in establishing its antagonists, the content of the side missions ensures the game remains interesting throughout. Its ability to transport players into its supernatural Tokyo is not to be understated, and uncovering the different Japanese spirits while helping those unable to move on gives the game a thoroughly engaging loop that is hard to put down. In an already strong gaming year, Ghostwire: Tokyo is another title absolutely worth investing time into.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If it’s not abundantly clear, I thoroughly enjoyed my five dozen hours with this game. Though I didn’t complete a romance, I look forward to that in the endless post-game. There are definitely some notable issues, and players’ experiences are going to vary in response to those, especially since since they have lingered in the Japanese release, but they never detracted from the core gameplay loop for me. Rune Factory has always been a chill experience with some light action RPG elements to it, and that’s exactly what the newest title delivers.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Horizon Forbidden West embraces everything about its predecessor and makes strides in producing an even more compelling world to explore, with intense combat and story moments, and shiny new robo-dinosaurs to punch in the face. I cannot wait to see where Aloy and her companions’ story goes next.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Young Souls is a prime example of the adage good things come to those who wait; with the title finally sprung from Google Stadia exclusivity, it’s the perfect time to see how the game manages to capture the ephemeral fun factor of a brawler, while proffering a multitude of options to make the game more or less challenging, depending on what the player is seeking. Add that to a great narrative with a visually engaging comic-book style of storytelling that doesn’t shy away from challenging topics, anyone looking to dive into a well-paced and superbly-executed adventure should start right here.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The Cruel King and The Great Hero is a heartwarming story that surprisingly has some depth to it. The visual and sound design brings the world to life with its attention to detail that remains pleasing through the entire fifteen-hour playtime. The depth and detail however doesn’t make its way into the battle system and gameplay. The encounter rate and slow pace can be frustrating while battles don’t require much thought until the end. However, the short playtime means it doesn’t take long to get there and ultimately the positives win out. Simply put, The Cruel King and The Great Hero is a charming tale and world that is worth visiting.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Prince’s Edition is probably the best way to enjoy this content, as its staggered inclusion throughout the game gives it more utility to the player as a means of raising levels, materiel, and equipment, rather than leaving one with a feeling of “more of the same” well after the player has exhausted what the main game has to offer. Ni no Kuni II: Revenant Kingdom is nothing like its predecessor in general playstyle, but it shares the same sense of whimsy and wonder, the same motifs of sadness and redemption, and is a well-built game overall.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Cloudpunk is the kind of game that places importance on narrative over gameplay and one that will feel considerably better on different platforms. It offers a memorable narrative with some great characters to meet along the way, and it’s admirable just how invested one can get in them considering their existence starts and stops (in most cases) with an on-screen character portrait and a voice-over. The city is vast and beautifully designed using voxel art, though players on Switch won’t bask in as much of its visual splendor. However, it’s also a game in which the narrative trumps all, even gameplay, with the only player interaction coming in the form of somewhat superficial vehicle sections and the odd on-foot segment. It’s a relatively short ride and well worth taking, as long as one’s expectations are dialed in correctly from the outset.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Voice of Cards: The Forsaken Maiden is a solid follow-up to The Isle Dragon Roars and is actually a more welcoming point for newcomers to jump in. Its pacing and presentation makes for a relaxing and generally chilled experience that still comes with plenty of emotion in its bittersweet narrative. There’s definitely reason for Square Enix and Alim to return to the Voice of Cards world, and it may once again be sooner than expected.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Dying Light 2 is a delightfully fast paced game, which has a few persistent issues bogging it down. Most issues have already started getting fixed, such as the audio bugs and auto save issues, but enemies being frozen in place and some quests having NPCs make odd choices still drags it down a bit. Still, even on the older console the game runs pretty great and load times are surprisingly not noticeable. The main story ramps up well with characters that matter and moments that vary from harrowing escapes to fun fights. Every moment of parkour is a treat, and combat does just well enough to stay out of the way, with a day/night cycle that varies, meaning there’s always something new to do. Here’s hoping those issues continue to get ironed out and leave the game to be what it’s best at, a harrowing fast-paced survival RPG with plenty to explore and loot.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Monark is an unrefined gem, but it is definitely a game worth checking out. While it certainly has some similar ideas as other properties, it pulls out enough tricks to make it different and individually inviting. Despite some issues, it’s a good first attempt with plenty of room for polish in any subsequent follow-up.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Maglam Lord has enough that some will thoroughly enjoy their time with it, particularly those looking for an enjoyable story and cast. However, it’s brought down by uninspired missions and poorly realised combat. It’s certainly not a bad title, and thankfully the issues that are there are such that they don’t create an active barrier to progress, but the entertaining parts are steadily diluted enough that the experience as a whole misses out on being something to be fully celebrated.

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