Slant Magazine's Scores

For 3,138 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 35% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 62% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Who Kill
Lowest review score: 0 Fireflies
Score distribution:
3138 music reviews
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    For as much as Eminem is still a technical master at spitting non-stop stream-of-conscious tongue twisters, his purported profundity as a social critic is often wielded axiomatically rather than thoughtfully interrogated. The actual content of his lyrics remains as incoherent as ever.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The extended solo that closes the song drips with the heartache that courses through the rest of the songs. In the end, Passage du Desir serenity belies an intense human longing.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The way Clairo’s voice glides over the grooves on Charm makes it all feel effortless, especially compared to the virtuosic performances around her. That effortlessness is not just the result of the creative alignment of the myriad musicians involved, but the clear vision of the artist at the helm.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    My Light, My Destroyer, is the zippiest rocker she’s penned to date, but her whispercore vocals—so pitch-perfect on the album’s opener, the hazy morning reverie that is “Devotion”—clash with the song’s jagged electric guitars and chugging rhythm. Fortunately, this is an anomaly on an album in which Jenkins’s voice typically melts seamlessly into the subtle, vast sonic tapestry.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A playful tribute to a beloved feline titled “Longcat” are signs that Hiatus Kaiyote don’t take themselves too seriously. And we shouldn’t either. But, dotted as it is with obvious references to The Wizard of Oz and Alice in Wonderland, the self-indulgent Love Heart Cheat Code can’t help but register as Psychedelia for Dummies.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While some of the power of How Will I Live Without a Body? comes from its obliqueness, Loma manages to locate a middle ground between embracing one’s darker emotions and finding a way out of them.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    While Cabello might view C,XOXO as an adventurous new step in her career, it plays more like a TikTok video: attention-grabbing, disposable, and instantly forgettable.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is DiFranco’s first album in over a decade to feature a co-producer, BJ Burton, and the result is her most musically varied set in years.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Abrams’s gift for conveying her emotions in words, and the glimpses of vocal expression she teases throughout The Secret of Us, suggest she’s capable of striking a balance that might result in a truly great pop album. Here, though, the secret to that success eludes her.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Dopamine is a reflection of who Normani is as an artist at this particular moment in time, and it reinforces the notion that there is indeed value in taking one’s time in order to deliver something of substance.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Poptical Illusion embodies his curiosity, drive, and desire to explore uncharted territory, while offering wisdom that can only be attributed to his age. Cale doesn’t seem to care about relevancy. He’s just looking to continue growing.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At her best, which is more often than not, Aurora’s literal and figurative voice is uniquely her own. “Learn my body and my poems/And repeat them like you own them,” she offers on “Dreams.” It’s this sense of poetry that keeps What Happened to the Heart? from feeling pedantic. But most of all, it’s her ability to locate the big, beating heart inside the machine.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While Brat is undeniably bratty and brash, it’s also frequently vulnerable. .... Charli’s exploration of her priorities isn’t merely slapped atop catchy club beats though. Her ambivalence is in direct conversation with the music itself.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While it lacks the cohesion and tenderness of Lei Line Eon, Tidal Memory Exo largely finds Malliagh confidently carving out his own identity as an electronic music innovator.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    At times, the simplicity of Khan’s lyrics can leave songs like “At Your Feet” feeling too thinly sketched. .... And yet, there’s a tangible undercurrent of impending grief that ripples beneath the surface of the album’s tracks that is, perhaps, reflective of the inherent heartbreak of parenthood.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Dark Times plays like a musical memoir, even if not all of its stories are entirely autobiographical. For a rapper who’s always leaned toward a cynical perspective, Staples shines when he leans into the struggle, using his experience as both an example and a cautionary tale.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Packed with multipart songs and self-referential lyrics that reward repeat listens, the album is a world unto itself—and the most fully realized version of Eilish’s sound.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Lives Outgrown presents an artist whose capabilities have been sharply honed, with the skill to convey all of life’s complicated, thorny emotions.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If Cook’s career is defined by one thing, it’s pushing the boundaries of the genre to their limits. With that in mind, Britpop is some kind of culmination of that effort, challenging the listener’s assumptions about what pop is, and offering an exciting glimpse of what it could be.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite their short runtimes, though, many of these songs still pack an undeniable punch, thanks in large part to Parker and Harle’s meticulous production.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Unusual musical choices, like the inclusion of glockenspiel on “Denon,” create some sonic interest. More than anything, though, Camera Obscura excels at generating a mood and a sense of warmth. If they stick too closely to familiar sonic territory on Look to the East, Look to the West, it is, at least, one that they’ve mastered.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With Forgiveness Is Yours, Saoudi and company achieve that objective—with a patina of sophistication.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Though Fu##in’ Up maintains the same track sequence as Ragged Glory, the titles have changed, each borrowing a lyric from the songs themselves. And when the album does deviate musically from its source material, it does so with subtlety and purpose.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The album finds Clark at her most fragile and ferocious, seeking beauty among the waste and wreckage of 21st-century life. Itself a beautifully ugly thing, All Born Screaming is a visceral examination of art and nature when both are pushed to the brink.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The Tortured Poets Department plays out as a pop album that sounds fine enough but sure is long-winded.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Silence Is Loud tells a fairly coherent story, of a person trying to salvage a relationship but weighing skepticism about how worthy it is of being saved. Archives, though, is ultimately unable to wring enough pathos from the narrative she presents. She’s a skilled designer of breathless jungle soundscapes, stocked with immersive details like aquatic synths, endless breakbeats, and jagged basslines, but she hasn’t fully mastered the autobiographical soul-pop mode.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album’s 10 brisk, lightly rocking songs evoke the radio-friendly pop-rock of early-2000s Sheryl Crow or Jewel while sometimes, as on the title track, looking further back to ’70s soft rock a la Carole King.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    At just seven tracks, the album proves to be paradoxically sparse in its loose, leisurely construction but dense in its intense inscrutability. Exotic Birds of Prey’s resistance to form, accessibility, and interpretation will either draw you in or push you away—and that’s probably the point.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Only God Was Above Us is ultimately just another (very good) Vampire Weekend album rather than a radical shift. It essentially sees the band dressing up their patented medium-paced, occasionally frantic, symphonic rock in see-through disguises.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Apart from a few key songs that continue down the lyrical path charted on Mordechai, A La Sala is largely a retread of Khruangbin’s idiosyncratic brand of dubby psychedelia.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s an album of Americana not in the banal, produced-by-Dave Cobb sense, but in the truest senses of narrative and musical form.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    What’s frustrating is that Ohio Players boasts some great hooks beneath the mire.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    On We Don’t Trust You, though, Future seems content to be set dressing for Metro’s elaborate production.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Real Power stands as a testament to the Gossip’s unyielding dedication to their signature style. Admittedly, reminding fans and critics that the band helped pioneer pop-punk disco isn’t an unsmart way to stage a comeback. But for anyone hoping that the Gossip might have evolved in the years since 2012’s A Joyful Noise, Real Power is likely to be a real letdown.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    With an abundance of material, one could never fault Everything I Thought I Was for being too conservative, but it’s an all too clear case of quantity over quality, resulting in quickly diminishing returns.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Mixing R&B and electronica isn’t uncommon in pop music today, but For Your Consideration boasts an unusual combination of production polish and musical eccentricity, harking back to Björk’s early solo albums and Timbaland’s work with Aaliyah.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The way Crutchfield’s crystalline voice penetrates her music’s often beautiful, serene instrumentation on Tigers Blood dovetails with her gutting truth-telling.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With Bright Future, Lenker stands on the confidence of her talent, complemented by production choices that neither distract nor detract from the emotion of her songwriting.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    WWW may be a candid and sophisticated analysis of the dark side of fame, but it’s also eminently entertaining and occasionally funny, and it (re)establishes Whack as one of the most creative rappers in the game.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    But if the album’s unwaveringly restrained instrumentation holds it back from ranking alongside Musgraves’s best work, it’s still a welcome shift away from the country pop of 2018’s Golden Hour.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If there’s a primary critique to be leveled at Eternal Sunshine, it’s that the midtempo R&B that defined Grande’s last two albums, Positions and Thank U, Next, is once again so prominent. The house-pop “Yes, And?” is a bit of a bait and switch, as only two other tracks on the album, the disco-infused “Bye” and the Robyn-esque “We Can’t Be Friends,” stray from Grande’s preferred musical mode. That’s not to say that the album’s R&B fare isn’t satisfying in its own right.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Blue Lips epitomizes what a return to form should strive for: to serve as a reminder of past greatness, yes, but to also be a bold departure from what’s come before, embracing risks and pushing boundaries, even if it occasionally teeters on the edge of excess.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Not content to be tied to a single genre, location, or mood, Webster finds pleasure in the discomfort of feeling like she doesn’t belong.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Playing Favorites proves that Sheer Mag can show off their softer underbelly just as skillfully as they do their fangs.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Repetition is a big one, and not just in the sense of saying the same word over and over again—which Yeat does on “Psychocainë,” whose chorus has him shuffling through several permutations of the phrase “I forgot”—but in songs that, though they’re certainly cutting edge when compared to what else is out there, begin to blur together over time. But while that prevents 2093 from sounding quite as forward-minded as its title suggests, Yeat is finally tapping into a style he can confidently call his own.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Mannequin Pussy offers an answer in their refusal to accept the status quo. Through a balance of firebrand punk and intoxicating power pop, I Got Heaven is a musical expression of self-governance and all the pain and pleasure that comes with it.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even as de Casier explores the experience of uncertainty, she exhibits confidence in her identity as a singularly detail-oriented artist.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Almost every song on Girl with No Face was written and produced by Hughes, and this creative autonomy gives the album a personal touch that past releases like 2017’s CollXtion II lacked. The songs here are imbued with an obvious newfound strength and confidence.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With Untame the Tiger she’s left behind the world of magical animals and imaginary beings she once used to sing about, but her melodies and arrangements retain a touch of the timeless and otherworldly.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    After spending most of their career up to now signed to a major label, MGMT seems to have found space to make the kind of music they want without sacrifice here. The anxious tension of unmet expectations that used to hang over them is gone—and you can hear it in the songs.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite confronting such daunting themes as grief, addiction, and identity, The Past Is Still Alive rarely feels heavy. Much of this owes to Segarra’s reliably triumphant outlook in the face of adversity. .... Credit also goes to producer and co-engineer Brad Cook, who helps couch Segarra’s words in unfussy Americana that’s easy on the ear.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    To imbue that previous album with a timeless R&B quality, Lopez sought out veteran knob-twirler Bruce Swedien, who engineered and mixed classics like Michael Jackson’s Thriller. This Is Me…Now attempts to replicate that sound—and “Mad In Love” and “Not. Going. Anywhere.” both come close—but most of the album falls short of that lofty bar.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Sonically, it’s a triumph, a delicately textured musical realm that begs to be luxuriated in. What’s missing is the same level of songwriting that elevated Howard’s previous work. There are a few standout tracks, but no burrowing hooks on the level of “Don’t Wanna Fight” or “Stay High.” The only time she comes close to those earlier songs is on the propulsive “Red Flags.”
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Tangk underpins its more personal and emotional lyrics with rich, layered arrangements. It’s in this delicate balance of sound and sentiment that the album finds its groove—not always in the heights it occasionally struggles to reach, but in its earnest exploration of love.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    For every few colorless duds defined by their embrace of contemporary R&B, such as the overly smooth “Kissing Strangers” or the brassy “Big,” there’s a creative cut or two, like the suave “Margiela.”
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There’s a tension in Wolfe’s music between a tendency to overdramatize or cloak her pain in gothic imagery and a genuine yearning to be heard and understood. While the former can feel facile, She Reaches Out to She Reaches Out to She more often manages to arrive at the latter. Wolfe’s songs might avoid specific details about her actual life, but the sturm und drang coursing through them is potent and deeply felt.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Challenging, startling, and deeply powerful, this rallying closer confirms what the previous nine songs already suggested: that Carlisle is a singular artist and that Critterland is a worthy addition to the canon of country-folk classics.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Whether Wall of Eyes is a last stop for the Smile or merely a layover to some yet-undefined place, it’s an undeniably mesmerizing trip.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On her sixth studio album, What an Enormous Room, she pulls back on the eccentric, stadium-ready rock of 2021’s Thirstier in favor the kind of introspective dirges that characterized her early work. As a result, the album offers slightly less in the way of hooks but homes in further on themes of anxious attachment and personal growth.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    As on past albums like 2017’s The Far Field, the quieter passages here are projected with too much force to either serve as a contrast to the songs’ more bombastic sections or fully convey the import of the lyrics. This grows especially tiring on tracks like “The Fight” and “Corner of My Eye,” which are synth-pop equivalents of stadium power ballads. Were the music itself able to match the downbeat undertones of Herring’s words, it might pack a bigger punch.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Tucker and Brownstein deserve credit for continuing to take risks and experiment with Sleater-Kinney’s established sound, resulting in another solid effort in an unexpectedly fruitful late period.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    These songs may diverge from the ones that made Green Day a household name, but three decades later, they continue to strike a balance between teen spirit and maturity.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While the lyrics offer a precious few glimmers of defiance, Hackman’s production choices, featuring mostly instruments played by the musician herself, have the verve to suggest not only an artistic resurgence, but a personal one.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Tracks like “Balloons” and “Afro Futurism” feature some of the fiercest political critiques and nimbly performed rapping of Warner’s career. Her delivery is poised yet casual, her charmingly nasal voice full of weariness and vulnerability.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Despite some catchy moments, there’s almost nothing about Pink Friday 2 that makes it stand out from the current slate of pop and rap music. Unlike its predecessor, the album doesn’t leave much of an impression, and certainly won’t reshape the hip-hop landscape.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Without the distractions and clashing frequencies of a full band, one can better appreciate how the album has been cut together, with subtle musical segues, clever editing, and consideration for overlapping lyrical themes.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    In the end, this is a dramatically uneven project that demonstrates its creators’ unwillingness to grow up and, more damningly, their inability to conceive of a concept and see it through.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The First Time features some of his weakest hooks to date and a slew of songs that are so unsatisfyingly short so as to feel half-finished.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    i/o
    While the “Bright Side” mixes bring out the album’s more dynamic range, the lyrics lack the edge of Gabriel’s early music. The earnest perspectives of songs like “Love Can Heal” and “Live and Let Live” are apparent right from their titles, with the latter in particular succumbing to cliché. And the more subdued “Dark Side” mixes only highlight those flaws. i/o is heartfelt and meticulously crafted, but its impact is muted by its splintered presentation.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Quaranta makes for an often frustrating experience, where tracks will circle around a topic with some level of pathos but seem incapable of ever reaching their full potential.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The album presents a trio that’s getting back on their feet and figuring out how to be a unit again. It’s a feeling that’s echoed in the re-issue’s 11-song “warts-and-all rehearsal” recorded during a live taping of the television series Party of Five in 1999.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    To her credit, Parton still manages to make Rockstar sound and feel like a Dolly Parton album, thanks in large part to her distinctive twang. She and producer Kent Wells make some subtle changes to these songs, like a richer and deeper piano tone on Elton John’s “Don’t Let the Sun Go Down on Me” and denser lead guitar on “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction,” though more inventive arrangements would have distinguished these versions from the originals.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The album’s satisfying and detail-rich production choices, courtesy of co-producers like Greg Kurstin and Mura Masa, achieve a tonal cohesion throughout.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    So while the album may play it a little safe, it also smartly plays to its creator’s strengths.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Stapleton knows that his vocals don’t need to be forceful to make an impact, a point driven home on the beautiful closer “Mountains of My Mind,” on which his intimate voice is paired with just an acoustic guitar. But while tracks like that are evidence of Stapleton’s singing and storytelling abilities, more often than not, the songs on Higher struggle to take off.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Zig
    Aside from the disco-fied “Motorbike,” inspired by Jack Cardiff’s 1968 drama The Girl on a Motorcycle, most of Zig takes few such risks. As a result, Poppy has become what she’s successfully evaded up to this point: predictable.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With Phone Orphans, Veirs exposes her creative process and, in doing so, maps out the rich topography of her psyche.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Despite the fact that Robed in Rareness runs about the length of an episode of your average sitcom, its songs are so vaporous that one may have a difficult time remembering them. Put bluntly, the album underscores just how much Shabazz Palaces is running on fumes.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album’s first half remains stronger overall, but it’s the latter half that more fully justifies the re-recording. The five new “From the Vault” tracks are all solid, though they don’t function as a true thematic and aesthetic extension of the album in the way that the additions to Red (Taylor’s Version) did.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Songs like “Re-entering” and “World on Fire” in particular feel like nothing more than wandering sketches. Still, Hval and Volden’s modus operandi has been to push barriers, regularly tickling some pleasure point you didn’t know you needed, while perhaps neglecting the one you thought you did.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It doesn’t exactly reinvent the pop-punk wheel—it also could’ve stood to lose about half a dozen songs—but its brightest, most exhilarating spots are a welcome reminder of what made the trio so iconic in the first place.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    As high-energy and catchy as most of Hackney Diamonds is, though, the album also showcases a few tracks that suggest that the Stones might be better off embracing their age rather than asserting their eternal youthfulness (“I’m too old for dying and too young to lose,” Jagger declares on “Depending on You”).
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    What Something to Give Each Other lacks in poignancy, though, is made up for by the joy with which it embraces queer pleasure.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Water Made Us is an undeniably human album, authentic and sincere in its navigation and preservation of love, all told through the lens of Woods’s own experience.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    But for the most part, For All the Dogs lives up to its title. In short: woof.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Diamond’s critique of online culture and its effects on our self-perception aren’t new. The crucial difference here is that she locates herself inside the machine, without claiming she can escape the traps she sings about. Diamond constructs a world of exaggerated femininity without drowning in irony.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    These contrasts—between the intimate and the grand, the divine and the natural—dovetails with what Stevens has always done best as a songwriter: bridging the universal and the personal. Javelin doesn’t just feel like a return to form—it feels resurgent.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    “A Barely Lit Path” effectively locates the humane within the machine, the ghost in the shell, and further affirms Again as one of Lopitan’s most sincere and spellbinding statements yet.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Whereas the earlier album was full of light, poppy beats, there’s more nuance to be found in the saturated, driving hooks here.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Though these tracks are perfectly adequate, even pretty (especially the vocal melodies on “Evicted”), it’s disappointing to see the band play it safe on an album that aims to be their most adventurous in years. Of course, the band proves that they can still write pensive ballads without succumbing to the clichés of contemporary indie music.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The breathtakingly gorgeous “Stride Rite” is about as pensive as Animal Collective has ever been. Composed of a myriad of cascading piano chords, the song amounts to an eerie, ethereal experience about the many heartbreaks that come with maturation, one expressed with a level of clarity that’s sorely lacking from the rest of Isn’t It Now?
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Doja’s patently irreverent musings on these topics are diverting and humorous, but they’re not served by being presented in such self-serious stylistic trappings. As a result, the album winds up being an uneven grab bag of tracks that aspire to high-brow West Coast rap and down-the-middle pop—the work of a talented MC in search of the right tonal balance.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album’s consistent layer of distortion and commitment to brooding unify the songs and solidify Yeule’s unique, and grim, musical style. With Softscars, Yeule expands, refines, and masters their creative vision.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Only Tension’s title track, with its digitally enhanced vocal hook, veers into territory that could be described as “experimental.” Which is to say, for better or worse, Tension is another Kylie Minogue album.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    “Thug It Out” and “Pretty Brown Eyes” find the wunderkind tempering his energy, modulating his tone without flattening it. Would that he applied that approach to the album’s sprawl and structure too.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Here [on “Can I Talk My Shit”] and on “You Know How,” her vocals feel devoid of any distinctive characteristics and are needlessly Auto-Tuned. .... Fortunately, the album’s second half—its sterling middle section in particular, from “Autobahn” through “Don’t Know How”—is vastly more rewarding. These tracks don’t strain as hard to fit into contemporary Spotify playlist formulas and allow Tamko to get back to the more the intimate, sophisticated sound of 2019’s Vagabon.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The few tolerable moments across How Do You Sleep at Night? come from either outside voices, including a minute-long verse from Fousheé on “Sweet” that outclasses the bulk of Tezzo’s trite observations, or whenever Teezo is shamelessly copying from others, as he does on “Mood Swings” and the Steve Lacey-lite “Familiarity.”
    • 91 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Despite occasional missteps like that and “Pretty Isn’t Pretty,” which feels like a risk-averse treatise on an important issue, Guts is more consistent than Rodrigo’s debut. Her writing has gotten more precise, which makes both her self-criticism and frequent barbs hurled at others land all the better. She’s also writing with a knottier, less easily resolved perspective this time around.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Land Is Inhospitable and So Are We’s numerous emotional peaks, from “Star” to “My Love Mine All Mine,” are so moving that the listener may also be convinced that love is a light in a dark world, a pillar of fire in the wilderness. Indeed, Mitski’s ability to pack so many gut-punches and inspired ideas into half an hour remains uncannily impactful.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Like Hersh herself, the album resists convention and refuses to be pinned down.