Slant Magazine's Scores

For 659 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 25% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 72% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 DmC: Devil May Cry Definitive Edition
Lowest review score: 10 Troll and I
Score distribution:
660 game reviews
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The game is boorish, infantile, and violent, and, in refusing to take any sort of consistent stand, is wildly off the mark.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    All that’s cool about flying a giant world-saving robot has been executed in the most leaden, user-unfriendly, nonsensical manner possible.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite dropping “of War” from its title, Gears 5 is the first time the series has made the brutality of its combat feel not only bloody and cathartic, but also captivating and disturbingly intimate on a human level.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Without a sense of feedback or progress, the rambling, leisurely narrative of Telling Lies comes across as unfocused.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Our ancestors didn’t have it easy, and that’s the for-better-and-worse message reverberating through every interaction in the game.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If you ask if something is possible for you or your Legion to do in Astral Chain, most of the time, the answer is yes.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Not only does Blair Witch cheapen the idea that a dog is man’s best friend, it also falls apart like a cheap chew toy.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    One hopes Man of Medan will function similarly to a mediocre TV pilot for a series that only later finds its footing.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    With its everything-but-the-kitchen-sink imagination, Control is as much a thrilling paean to human curiosity as it is a warning of its numerous casualties.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Even when the game isn’t actively shooting itself in the foot, it never entirely succeeds.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Rad
    The more often you get stuck with the same items and abilities, the more redundant and shallow the game feels.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    With Fire Emblem: Three Houses, a series known for its extravagant tales of power-grabbing attains an especially epic, moral grandeur with its focus on the interplay between education and religion.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The game isn’t really supposed to be about anything, yet in that ambiguity it captures the specific madness of our present.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    As the game never really switches up its formula, it’s not long before fatigue sets in.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The game’s first-person-shooter sequences aren’t just dull and familiar, but also clunky, given the touchy VR controls.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    It experiments with all the weakest parts of the series and ties them together with a new, tedious progression system.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    So much of the game feels only slightly more cohesive than someone scribbling the word “depression” over, say, a picture of a person being eaten by a shark.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Whatever barriers to the player’s imagination existed in the first iteration of this game, Nintendo has torn many of them down.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    The similarities between SolSeraph and ActRaiser are unmistakable, but it’s a joyless facsimile that lacks a single spark of innovation.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Where the game goes in-depth, and where it clearly feels most comfortable, is in its omnipresent brawls.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The occasional two-second load screen is a paltry price for experiencing a near-masterwork.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    For what seems meant to be a horror game about piecing together clues and cobbling together what’s left of your sanity, long stretches of The Sinking City are inordinately concerned with killing the shit out of some monsters as a sort of Chosen One.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Every shootout is an opportunity to execute a thoroughly balletic performance of sorts.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This is a rare adventure game in which the journey is actually more of a reward than the destination.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Even the few inventive stretches of the game are ultimately driven into the ground by a punishing sense of repetition.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Few games are as transportive as this, and fewer still will leave players so utterly convinced that they never want to see such a place for as long as they live.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The game forsakes worldbuilding as it increasingly gives itself over to making the most digressive of statements.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It fits together disparate genres so perfectly that you wonder how nobody thought to combine them sooner.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It’s not greed in this day and age to expect publishers to respect and preserve their history. At this point, it’s an artistic responsibility.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The game’s first few acts are its finest, particularly for their strong sense of physicality and connection to filmmaking methods and aesthetics.

Top Trailers