Spin's Scores

  • Music
For 4,152 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 Phantom Power
Lowest review score: 0 They Were Wrong, So We Drowned
Score distribution:
4152 music reviews
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Across the album’s 13 exceedingly catchy yet contradictory tracks, Puth laments his success and desirability while boasting about both. ... Voicenotes feels like a step, at the very least, in the right direction.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    7
    A short, precise album which is equal parts inventive and masterful.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The result is an eclectic mix of tempos and moods that maintain Kozalla’s sense of whimsy without sacrificing earnestness.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    By nature the album highlights their aesthetic differences, but at no point makes a strong argument for their separation. Still, it’s a bit of an awkward listen, with each of the three discs displaying obvious charms but none following through on its promise completely.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There’s little to be found here with the immediacy of yore, but this ends up working in the album’s favor: the more you give in to these vibes, the more the vibes give back. That goes double for Turner’s lyrics, which are playfully quotable in a manner that recalls the opaque asides of Destroyer’s Dan Bejar.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    While writing some of the most accessible music of her career, she makes fun of the assignment a bit while completing it. The maturity of her songwriting voice on Rebound is staggering, and makes her enterprise feel like an emotionally embodied exercise as well as a technical, aesthetic one.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Beyondless is a far cry from the New Brigade immediacy that attracted fans, but it offers something perhaps much more valuable: longevity, if you’re on their side.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The hopelessness that loomed over his prior work gives way to a sort of circumspect hope on The Horizon Just Laughed, a new sense of things working out or having the chance to, and that’s victory enough.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Her ability to transcend her influences has always been song-to-song, and that’s true here, too. But it also feels like she is inching closer to a breakthrough: an album that fully lives up to her reputation and ambition.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    By no stretch of the imagination is Beerbongs & Bentleys a good album, but it’s admirable in its commitment to its strangely singular dirtbag vision of L.A. luxury. It isn’t consistent enough to mold Post Malone fully into the Soundcloud rap version of Ed Sheeran, but it will certainly allow him to stick around for at least a few more years.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Grid of Points is as untidy as 2005’s Way Their Crept or 2008’s Dragging a Dead Deer Up a Hill. What’s different--and what’s key--is that in her ongoing embrace of the piano, Harris has made room in her artistry for a new sensation: the unmistakable glow of comfort.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Even when the concept stumbles, parts of Vide Noir are pretty enjoyable listening anyway, like the flecks of psychedelic guitar across the title track and the filigree detail and sensual current of “Moonbeam.”
    • 68 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Its smug, unexplored sense of intellectual superiority is pretty much all it has to offer. Musically, it’s an hourlong misallocation of the considerable resources that made a nu-metal minor classic out of 2000’s Mer de Noms.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For the most part, they don’t disappoint.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sparrow transcends its own tastefulness, and odds are excellent you’ll find it gorgeous.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    KOD
    It’s a commendable effort, with Cole putting himself in a creative territory to respond to critics, peers and progeny. His messages are timely despite the fact that they continue, rather than conclude, a larger conversation.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite its tortuous path to existence, Joyride is a strong, cohesive project.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Invasion of Privacy is a cohesive piece of work that demands to be heard in full, from front to back, side to side, on the pole and on the stove.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    “Outer Acid” remains uncanny in its mix of blissful keys and menacing acid squiggles and “Spy” diffuses some dubby harmonica into Heard’s atmospheres. “Inner Acid” returns to the squelchy acid house Heard made back in the ‘80s and the knocking beat and bells of “Nodyahed” suggest that he can still make a dancefloor quake.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    America presents the most contemporary, Top 40-friendly version of Thirty Seconds to Mars to date. Bombastic drums and guitars have largely been replaced with fairly tame looped and programmed beats and ominous synths, basically reimagining Thirty Seconds to Mars as the glossy grungetronica of Imagine Dragons. Leto still screams like a banshee, but for once the sounds backing him don’t match his fury.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Expectations is an insistent but uneven album that points toward greater musical ambitions than it achieves. The sound is pleasantly aquatic and soft-edged but fussy and overwrought, as though its architects were worried that too much downtime might spur listeners to click away.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    By balancing on the tightrope between meme and icon, between relatable and aspirational, Ephorize emerges sounding remarkably human.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The richness of the music occasions her best vocal performances to date. The arrangements are airy with distance and light, but their architecture is boldly drawn: the basslines thick and taut, the arpeggios whirring and spangled, the guitars unfurling in a glossy neon cursive.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The best you could say for Lil Xan is that he can be serviceable: “Saved by the Bell” and “Shine Hard” are catchy enough, and at least fully-formed ideas. The album may be bad but it is not especially so. It’s paint by numbers and as such blends in with everything else. You might hear it at an Urban Outfitters and confuse it for three other recent rap albums you’ve heard.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Freer of their influences, Hop Along have produced a stunning batch of songs--each of them like a small world of its own, continuously unfolding.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Here’s hoping The Tree Of Forgiveness is not either an incidental or deliberate farewell. If it must be, at least it’s both a suitably goofy celebration of his career and a dignified capstone.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Kinetic and thrilling as the uptempo blasts are, where Your Queen shines is on the slower pieces, revealing that Hutchings can purr, murmur and wax lyrical as well.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The production retreats into his comfort zone. But it is also really just a breakup album, and a really mopey one at that.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Where she once had a compelling songwriting portfolio, here she has a compelling mood. That mood’s best described as “content.” ... It’s not a belting voice, but it’s a remarkable instrument, capable of imbuing with winsome empathy songs.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    McMahon’s most transcendent statement yet. ... Freedom rings as both immediate and timeless, intensely personal and easily understood. ... Freedom exalts in subtlety. It offers powerfully economical songwriting.