The 405's Scores

  • Music
For 1,428 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 58% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 38% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 74
Highest review score: 100 Neon Icon
Lowest review score: 15 Weezer [Black Album]
Score distribution:
1428 music reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    While Jepsen has once again delivered a stunning hook-filled record that frankly gets catchier every time you hear it, Dedicated may not quite satisfy our lust for connection.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The talented likes of Lisa Hannigan and Sharon Van Etten attempt to breathe life into affairs, but there’s no resuscitating a creature that never breathed to begin with. No less, they for some reason decided to draw this death rattle out across their longest album to date, blindly moping through an inexplicably sixty-three minute run time.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Your mileage with This Mess is a Place may indeed vary, but more than anything, if you’ve had a lousy, or dull, day, it’s sure to jump start your tired mind into grinning goofily with its sugary, determinedly peppy rush.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    And, on the whole, Clinic’s paean to the 70s is a satisfying reinforcement of the current, clichéd view of that decade. It is lovingly put together. It yearns to experience an age that is tantalisingly close, but entirely out of reach.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    All of the album’s five tracks share the same aural characteristics of minimalist and pulsating synth drone, languid vocals and swirls and ripples of mechanised undulations and the album feels like a complete body of work rather than a collection of songs.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It feels Mac also went through these motions creating Here Comes The Cowboy, something is lacking, and it feels like it was motivation. That being said, with this record Mac has taken some creative risks.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Cohen’s voice doesn’t do all the heavy lifting. The instrumentation is lush, and Owens’ production pristine, with each and every layer given time to shine. It can all be a bit glossy, but how else should one approach such joy? It suits the feelings found here well, and makes Welcome Home and endlessly pleasant abode to inhabit.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    HÆLOS may still look toward the past, but their sound continues to push towards the future, heaving up their influences and dragging them all the way into whatever bleak tomorrow the band sees ahead. Any Random Kindness is an album of a generation lost, looking for humanity, gripping to whatever feeling they’ve managed to retain.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is a world to become truly lost within. Fair warning, you may not want to come out.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    PROTO is already one-of-a-kind, but there are times when Herndon could’ve stood to push the envelope just a bit more, instead of giving lovely but somewhat slight and redundant moments like ‘Fear, Uncertainty, Doubt’ or the ‘Live Training’ interludes. But she’s in a class of her own when it comes to this sort of electronic pioneering.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    This is a more palatable and approachable record (even if Maguire sounds like he’s being beaten to death on ‘The Soft Hands of Stephen Miller’). But what’s missing is a lot of risk, something that each Pile record has revelled in.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Your Need is an impressively produced, immaculate-sounding, often beguiling record, whose slightness and concision are its only real drawbacks.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Useless Coordinates is not perfect, and there are some flat moments, such as ‘Unwound’ which is very artrock-by-numbers, but overall this is an album which kicks arse and promises much for the future from a band clearly enamoured with the idea of challenging themselves and their audience.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    This is R&B and dense pop bent to its creators will, rather than anything the other way around. This is Beyoncé for a panic attack. This is, only more and more so with time spent in its valleys and peaks, essential listening.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    With Father of the Bride, Vampire Weekend expand and re-contextualise their own creative universe, offer more questions than answers, take new risks, and open up new possibilities for their artistic future. In the process of doing so, they add at least a handful of brilliant tracks to their discography.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Big Thief’s most empathic and ethereal work yet. U.F.O.F. is by no means an album that will grab for your attention, it just rests in the atmosphere like a wavelength, waiting for you to tune in – and you’ll be richly rewarded when you find it.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Drastic Measures’ kaleidoscope of sound will undoubtedly charm you, as Sellers himself sings “she looks like a go-getter.”
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    While calling Fishing For Fishies stale at first may be a bit harsh, it becomes pronounced once you consider the adventurous image King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard has carved out for itself over the last five years. With this passive listening experience, rarely was I ever intrigued by the band’s songwriting.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    CrasH Talk is an unfortunate example of what can happen when someone gets the creative validation they’ve desired, only to find themselves at an impasse.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    [The stories] are universal and they are forgiving, and only a songwriter as soft and deft as Kevin Morby could have pulled it off so charmingly.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Dragons has taken some getting used to. With each listen, new details emerge.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    He’s gone as far as he can go, done all he can. He’s lost in a bursting world of endless storefronts, in an America he no longer recognizes. He hasn’t a clue what he needs, only that he needs it. Songs as easy to imbibe to as to heave a sigh to, these are fogged, fading portraits for the ages. We all need a new war.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    At their core, the songs are fundamentally concerned with unguarded and confessional intimacy yet the manner in which they are presented is a hindrance as, on the whole, there is a sheen to Designer which it could well do without.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    The quiet build on 'Where I Lay' gives way to a gorgeous explosion of pianos and drums with haunting harmonies that, more than anything, signals just how much Broderick has grown as a composer and vocalist in the space between albums.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    The second Drugdealer album isn’t quite the knockout it could have been, but it easily delivers on the promise of Collins’ debut. If his idea is to let this latest incarnation stick around for a while, we’re in for a real treat.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Sometimes he lands on stanzas worth savoring (“All that I fear is that all that I have given you is a ship out to nowhere that wants to be out of control/but I see the light in oh so many things out here, and a lifetime so gently now sits on the stairs to my home.”) Other times, timelessness gives way to stuffiness, with lyrics that act more like riddles he doesn’t really care about solving (“When every wind is an afterlife out here, what language do you dream in when you’re drunk?”)
    • 85 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    With Life Metal ... they have minimized those aspects of their sound which were perhaps becoming too comfortable for them, and too familiar for the audience. The result is a work rich in texture, depth and tenderness.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    Ventura feels more like a collection of songs than a fleshed-out album, but the runtime is much slimmer than Oxnard and its highs are quite a bit higher.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    For the most part, the album sears with sharp-witted tales of urban life set to a tense and restrained musical background but there is a waning of the insistent energy towards the album’s end.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Map of the Soul: Persona is a bold, if tempered, call to Western media.