The Boston Phoenix's Scores

  • Music
For 1,091 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 63% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 34% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 74
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    On Angles, the band tossed a few tunes out that sounded like carbon-copies of their first album, but on Machine they eschew that kind of market compromise in favor of following their strange muse, even if in the end most listeners will have trouble pegging down who it sounds like.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The results are hit-or-miss.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    These on-record musings never reveal the off-record Marnie, which is a shame, but the sprawling, chimerical Marnia brings you close enough to be captivating anyhow.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Welcome Oblivion tracks like techno-folk haunter "Ice Age" and the doom-pop jaunt "How Long?" make uncredited cameo appearances in your nightmares until you go insane and eat your own hands.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    Hit the Waves is so heartfelt as a pastiche of '80s alternative music that it almost muscles its way into being brilliant.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Four records deep, Pissed Jeans may have trimmed some heaviness, but they open space for discovery.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    New Moon is their most purposeful beast yet.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    It's easy to imagine her getting very famous, because Torres doesn't wash the songs out with its prettiness.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    AMOK is as heady and immersive as any great Radiohead album, but those comparisons eventually wilt: Yorke's new band has discovered a symmetry all its own.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    While lukewarm as a whole, The Messenger doesn't suck nearly enough to bruise Marr's status as a guitar deity on wheels.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    It ain't exactly Bill Shakespeare (or Trojans), but it gets the job done.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The beauty of Beach Fossils has always been in the tension between Payseur's disaffected deadpan and the band's super-visceral live shows (before Beach Fossils, he spent years playing in hardcore bands) and on Clash much of that post-punk energy translates seamlessly.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    Push the Sky Away feels heavy on breath-taking and woodshedding, an album of waiting for sparks to ignite.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    The lyrics resonate hard, though, felt most strongly when R√łnnenfelt sings with broad expressive shouts.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Calculated yet impulsive, Young Fathers prove Scottish hip-hop's viability.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    The Scottish outfit have delivered again with jangly pop full of skittering guitars, self-flagellating lyricism, and whimsy under a pall of darkness that no amount of the big spotlight can dispel.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Foals haven't lost their math-rock edge; they've infused it with fun.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    II
    Somebody needs to boot Nielson off his why-fi connection: beneath the murk is the work of a riveting craftsman.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Bleeding Rainbow provide tunes to which one could satisfactorily gaze at his or her shoes during any point of the year.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    The History of Apple Pie aren't exactly breaking new ground in the world of indie rock, but they are the sort of band who win you over in seconds.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    It's not as challenging as previous Ducktails recordings, but a pleasant pop record nonetheless, and the band's most universally accessible yet.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Beta Love is the best of both worlds: surprisingly slick and danceable, while subtly amplifying their art-school charm.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Anything in Return is his most melodic album.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Tortoise's John McEntire steps in for long-time producer Roger Moutenot, but any of these songs would fit perfectly on the band's last half-dozen albums.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    If there's a knock to be had against the Harlem rapper, it's that he lacks an original presence. So it's curious that for his major-label debut he's opted to further venture down the rabbit hole of references, loading Long.Live.A$AP with a bevy of guests with personalities far more distinctive than his own.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    Love Sign dips a little too far into the Fountains of Wayne kiddie pool.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Lysandre inevitably feels a bit skimpy. It's still an unnervingly tuneful warm-up: freed from his hipster shackles, Owens is harnessing the power of the incredibly uncool--and he's all the cooler for it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    For the jaded among us, this is regressive and full of genre-contrivance.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Fascinating speed-bumps aside, it's a mission still very much accomplished.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    And so it goes with Mogwai's A Wrenched Virile Lore: a broad range of electro producers, ambient knob-twiddlers, and singer-songwriters re-assemble the Scottish post-rock champs' most recent studio album, the excellent Hardcore Will Never Die, But You Will, mostly with shitty bonus-feature-styled results.