The Fly (UK)'s Scores

  • Music
For 370 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 61% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 II
Lowest review score: 10 Sequel to the Prequel
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 9 out of 370
370 music reviews
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This time round, perhaps due to Courtney’s settling down and the addition of Girls keyboardist Matt Kallman, the band sounds fuller and more mature, with a tendency to look forward rather than harking back to the past.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    In and of itself, So Long, See You Tomorrow is more or less flawless BBC; their music has always been polite, erudite and winsome, and that beat does not skip here.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    ‘Morning’ is stately in a hopeful sort of way; ‘Heart’ an uptempo standout that hints at the quiet majesty of Nick Drake in his ‘Bryter Layter’ period. Meanwhile the striking ‘Wave’ pits Beck’s vocal against a lush, sad string arrangement by his dad--but there are moments where the introspection slides into an acoustic torpor, too.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Oklahoma songwriter is back with some of her most ebullient, ambitiously styled music to date on St Vincent.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Occasionally the bare-bones arrangements, a virtue in the main, serve to expose minor shortcomings in the songs. But overall, it’s a quibble far outweighed by the thrill afforded by a record that’s as honest and open-hearted as anything this great band have put their names to yet.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Menace Beach may have their sonic ingredients already established, but the result is even better than the sum of their parts.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A well-rounded and mature second album.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Samantha Crain’s debut seems inextricably tied to that spirit [of alt. country], with its simple melodic warmth trumping contemporary notions of waistcoat-wearing ‘authenticity’.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    More Dum Dum than Vivian, September Girls’ debut LP is a reverb-ridden sass-pot of a thing--all fluttering eyelashes and scratchy underbelly.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Total Strife Forever (thanks, Foals) is an ambitious, absorbing debut, and still probably only a glimpse of what East India Youth’s capable of.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Sure, there’s clunky country passages (‘Houston Hades’), brassy crooning (‘J Smoov’) and Cream-y jams (‘Cinnamon and Lesbians’), but Malkmus’ wit remains more than intact in his middle-age.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It might be as modern as loincloth, but ‘California X’ is surely a future classic.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Join The Dots makes good on the band’s promise to deliver a new album every year, though you can’t help but feel certain songs were neglected in favour of more sophisticated production values.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even attention-grabbing appearances by Lovefoxxx and Hot Chip’s Alexis Taylor don’t distract from the ambition, intellectualism and plain-speaking seductiveness that make ‘SUM/ONE’ a more than impressive listen.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Mostly, these are exquisitely constructed slow jams--especially recent single ‘Cookies’, The-Dream-esque ‘Crazy Sex’ and the cashmere-soft, Kelly Rowland duet ‘All The Way’--but the pace becomes stagnant after a while.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It all feels rather too short, which was surely Mazes’ plan all along: leave ‘em wanting more.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Though Shangri La is at least entertaining, it’s without that lasting, killer incision that will guarantee longevity.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is just the latest in a series of EPs from the Philadelphian, though some may quibble it’s light on original material.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Featuring cameos from David Longstreth, Chairlift’s Caroline Polachek, Kindness and more Cupid Deluxe is a rich, rewarding listen.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There’s a handful of ballads too--the surest sign of maturity--but just when we think they’ve given up the pacy numbers forever, they sucker-punch us at the death with the perfect one-two combo of ‘Unwanted Place’ and ‘Young’.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Psychedelic leanings and Le Bon’s fragile Welsh lilt make Mug Museum a typically unusual listen, but its sincerity shines throughout, finding beauty in the strangest, sometimes saddest of places.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s good to have them back.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    When it works, it’s brilliant.... But at times Caramel feels undercooked.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    White Denim continue to teeter there.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Whilst Lorde’s world creates its own incredibly distinctive atmosphere, it feels accessible and open to maturing.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bold, vulnerable and pleasingly disjointed, miraculously Night Time, My Time was worth the wait.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With psych bite and cosmic volume stripped away, Nielson’s brilliant, dextrous playing and addled lyrical bravery are illuminated brighter than ever.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The now-quartet’s fourth record marries prickly melody with glossy discord, eclipsing not only its predecessors but its entire genre.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The enjoyably fluffy, pacy tunes here match Best Coast’s debut, but the content makes you want to scream ‘Get a f***ing life and chill out!’ at the speakers.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Thanks to the sheer joy with which he performs it (produced here for the first time by Kieran Hebden), it’s irresistibly, inevitably satisfying.