The Quietus' Scores

  • Music
For 1,974 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 62% higher than the average critic
  • 7% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 76
Highest review score: 100 Gentlemen At 21 [Deluxe Edition]
Lowest review score: 0 Lulu
Score distribution:
1974 music reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Despite the variety of genres and diversity of contributions, Thyrsis of Etna has a distinct sonic flavour. There is attention to balance. Each track has a cocoon-like sound that soothes and sedates a listener. ... Regardless of the names and history, the music has enough to keep one intrigued – or at least entertained.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If arguably too one-note to constitute a stone-cold triumph, the album serves as a charming side-bar to two stellar careers. It is a collaboration that soars without ever quite getting so close to the sun that its wings start to melt.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is a solid pop album and Nayeon’s charms shine. Her voice, visuals, and sweet attitude deliver a feel-good tracklist full of fluffiness and catchy hooks, but it’s also clear that her own colour still waits to be found.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    NOT TiGHT is a solid showcase of the pair’s considerable chemistry.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Riderless Horse is quietly redemptive rather than world-razingly cathartic, and despite all the mental and emotional hardship she’s survived, Nastasia remains even-handed and philosophical.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There’s a cohesion and a vigour to Tick Tick Tick that may make it Mallinder’s finest and most enjoyable record in at least ten years (take a bow Hey Rube’s criminally slept on Can You Hear Me Mutha recorded with Fila Brazillia’s Steve Cobby in 2012).
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Yes, it really does nod towards Sound of Music and backs this cleverly with an illuminating barrage of steely industrial noise. Of course, the album will only truly explode into life when it surges into the live arena. A lavish and unique operatic gothic party that promises, as ever, to be a scream.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Life on the whole feels a little more erratic than usual for many of us and in under 45 minutes, Wu-Lu manages to skilfully capture this.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Her debut album The Spoils felt like a spell thrown into a mirror of static, and more than a decade later, her newest album trembles with a similar sense of rupturing enchantment.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Proof serves as a nostalgia trip for long-time fans of the septet and a summary introduction for the curious. With thirty old songs, three completely new tracks, and eleven new versions of well-loved classics, this album marks a satisfying closure to their first nine years as a group.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Despite the high quality of the arrangements, the orchestration and the recording as a whole, it is a bit too much at once. A case of less would have been more.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is the pop we need; considered, vital, comforting, spiritual.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What you will find is an artist keen on experimenting with mood and form. Much of the music probably makes greater sense alongside the dance project, but as a standalone piece of work it offers welcome insight into another side of Hadreas’ artistic temperament.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s a wonderfully dexterous and developed body of work that gives more of itself with each listen.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Although the stylistic variations across the two LPs make it seem as though there is more music here than could reasonably be expected to be contained within eleven tracks, much of it is highly accessible, addictive even.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The resulting music is stunning, perhaps a little more difficult to get a handle on than Amaryllis, but offering an invigorating glimpse into new territory for Halvorson. Though more abstract than its companion volume, Belladonna’s instrumentation tugs at the heartstrings aplenty.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A wonderful balance of melody and ferocity, their tunes tap into a wide-eyed joy at the heart of their rage. Serrated guitar noise and complex vocal parts mix with an adrenaline-rush rhythm section in concentrated blasts. It goes straight to your head.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The dark alchemy of Waterslide – named after one of the art-pieces Margolin painted during lockdown – ultimately flows from the manner in which it slithers under the skin even as it engages with that part of your monkey brain that enjoys a zinging pop song. ... As with much else here, the moment is beautiful and ugly and extraordinary.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ghosted is a record which depends on its cumulative effect. And in doing so, it reveals there’s the potential to find endless movement in even the most rigid structures.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Air
    Air feels like a swan song for a gorgeous world in peril.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    WE
    It opens with a piano motif that could’ve come straight from Chris Martin’s candle-scented fingers. The matching vocals are so annoyingly whispered, they practically qualify as ASMR. Halfway through, the song changes tack and starts courting the modern market for anxiety pop. ... More specifically, it makes you think, “Does this sound like a needy Mercury Rev, a ham-fisted Grandaddy, or Wings without the easy-going self-awareness?
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    All the pieces constitute a splendid array of transnational collaboration, a brilliant collage of ideas.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    When It Comes is a very balanced record that shows the artist standing on solid ground, in comfort with herself, and ready for a further creative take-off. A soothing and pleasant listen.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    One of the purest, most ferocious, most generous albums I’ve heard. A simple offering, and an outright masterpiece of emptiness and full-to-bursting-ness at the same time.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This album is too much of a piece to be picking out favourites, yet it is also one whose subtleties really reveal themselves on subsequent listens. Go on, dive in. Soak up the heat, discover what’s hidden underneath the overgrown foliage. You know you want to.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Characteristically, she doesn’t offer up any concrete solutions on Everything Perfect is Already Here. Instead, by listening to her music, and how she weighs every element with equal care, we’re able to stop and begin to find gratitude for the moments we might have once ignored, however fleeting they may be.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ultimately, Midnight Rocker is a worthy, maybe even essential, addition to both Horace Andy and Adrian Sherwood’s massive catalogues. It’s not perfect, but there’s a strange vitality in its imperfection, and that energy, that vitality – whatever it is – is incredibly compelling.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Funny, weird, irreverent, a bit messy in places, Wet Leg’s debut feels like a rollicking night out at your local indie disco compacted into thirty-six brisk and breezy minutes. Across a dozen by turns funny and fraught tracks, the highs and lows of twenty-something life are captured with zinging joie de vivre.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    An important component to the Paraorchestra’s practice is melding analogue, digital, and assistive instruments. The results, as heard across these eight ambitious compositions, are completely spellbinding. ...
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite this slightly bathetic penultimate track, however, Whatever The Weather is an excellent, and at times thrilling, exposition of a particular side of James’ music-making, a strange and alien concoction that reels you into its jellied depths.