TouchArcade's Scores

  • Games
For 3,503 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 23% same as the average critic
  • 26% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 78
Highest review score: 100 Bloodmasque
Lowest review score: 20 True Lover's Knot
Score distribution:
3508 game reviews
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There are 80 stages in total, and should you buy into the core conceit you’ll likely enjoy playing through them all. It’s not bad, but it takes more than a bit of graphical flourish to freshen up an idea that QUByte has revisited a bit too frequently.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s pretty tough and I love its strange nature, but the gameplay itself can wear thin after a while. Definitely a case of style over substance, but at least that style stands out.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The story is again the strongest point, but the cinnamon to oatmeal ratio here isn’t a great one. The battle system is certainly dressed up, but rarely goes anywhere exciting. In a quieter period I might have recommended this to RPG fans willing to forgive its healthy share of flaws, but we’ve been up to our ears in great RPGs of late and I don’t expect that flood to let up anytime soon.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is still the flagship fighter of the system, and a must-own if you have any interest in SNK’s ill-fated handheld. It’s been given the same high-quality Code Mystics treatment here as previous releases in this line, ensuring you’ll have the best possible experience with this game.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The writing and atmosphere are top-notch, and as long as you come into it knowing those things are the focus I think you’ll get on well with Haven.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Platforming controls are thankfully solid, but the combat simply doesn’t have enough depth to it to keep things interesting across the many skirmishes you’ll engage in. The presentation of the game is quite good, though the lengthy loading times make deaths sting that extra bit more. I think if you’re patient with Blue Fire you’ll find a lot to like here, but it really could have been a lot more.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    You can feel the passion for the classic games dripping from every pore, but you can also feel the budget crunch as the team tried to stay within their means. The world just isn’t as alive as some of the older games, but there are still plenty of joys to be had here with a fair bit less frustration to boot.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    I’ll say upfront that I wasn’t the biggest fan of either of the included games in their original forms. I think Citizens of Earth has dull combat and can get a little obnoxious. Citizens of Space has better combat but its story and themes don’t hit as well for me. Both games are trying hard to be funny and that is always a risky play. When you put them together, and do it in the very unique way Citizens Unite does, you get something that is a bit better than the parts of its whole. You can easily switch between the two games, and indeed there is some extra content in here that plays on that. Tired of Earth‘s battles? Jump over to Space. Want something a bit more grounded than Space‘s far-out setting? Hop back to Earth for a bit. Frankly speaking, both of these games are best enjoyed in smaller bites, and this unified collection greatly facilitates that approach.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    TOHU does a lot of things right and doesn’t really do anything seriously wrong, but I found myself feeling very ho-hum about it in the end. The art is really nice and I enjoyed many of the puzzles. But as pretty as it is, there’s something very “generic point-and-click adventure" about the game that keeps it from truly standing out. Touch controls work well enough but note that if you’re playing docked you’re going to have to deal with a relatively annoying cursor-based interface that doesn’t work all that well with a controller. There’s so much obvious love put into this game, but I’m not sure all that personality is enough to make this anything more than a fairly standard take on a well-worn concept.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    "Dungeon crawling roguelite plus Dark Souls" is an idea that could have gone horrifically wrong, but it by and large comes together in a solid way here. An unusual flavor that I expect will go down well with roguelite fans.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The difficulty curve in this game has been done very well, with a proper ramp up to some seriously challenging set-ups. The appeal is narrow, to be sure, but its laser-focus will almost certainly please puzzle fans of a particular sort.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Just like how SteamWorld Dig 2 absolutely blew me away with its improvements over the already amazing SteamWorld Dig, I cant wait to see Image & Form revisit SteamWorld Quest for a sequel because they definitely keep getting better with each new game. If you held off on playing SteamWorld Quest on other platforms for a potential mobile port, your wait has been more than worth it. Do yourself a favour and get it now.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If you remember the Scott Pilgrim game, this is it. The 2010 game on your Switch. No more, no less. Improvements that could have and perhaps should have been made are not part of the package. If Scott Pilgrim is new to you, this is a competent, energetic River City Ransom-inspired beat-em-up with a memorable, charming presentation and enough secrets and Easter Eggs to keep you invested for a while. There are better brawlers on the Switch, but none of those will let you beat up a telekinetic vegan until he explodes into a pile of Toonies. That’s worth a couple of points at least.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Well, this game is just plain awesome. It’s kind of a dungeon-crawl roguelite thing, but the battles use an interesting dice mechanic that really helps the game stand out. As you make your way through each floor, you’ll find various skills that you can pick and choose from to fill out your battle actions. Each turn you roll a number of dice and assign them to those skills to use them. There are lots of different kinds of enemies and skills, and the maps themselves, while simple, have some points of interest and branching paths you can choose to explore. One of those games where you fire it up meaning to play for twenty minutes and end up playing for four hours. I’d expect no less from Terry Cavanagh, though.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The Mercenaries series is probably never going to win any prizes for originality, but it does what it does quite well. To the developer’s credit, each game gets a little better. Mercenaries Blaze is no exception, and its new 3D backgrounds help bring the presentation a little closer to the game most players tend to associate this genre with. Setting all that aside, this is a meat-and-potatoes tactical RPG that offers a decent story, satisfying character building, and enjoyable battles. It’s a fairly lengthy affair, so you get a good bang for your buck. I’ve been happy enough with all of the games in this series, and Mercenaries Blaze keeps the tradition going.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The campaign mode is amusing enough but not really worth the price of admissions alone. Battling against other players is more fun, provided you can find opponents. Still, there’s a certain thrill to seeing giants battling it out, especially if you pick up the Ultraman DLC. This Switch version has some performance issues when the action gets hot, but it’s not unplayable or anything. Probably not the optimal way to play, though.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Frankly, outside of a few minor issues with the controls, I think this is as good of a port of Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night as we could expect on mobile. It’s a good game, and it fits mobile quite well. I’d probably recommend picking up Castlevania: Symphony of the Night ahead of this game, but there can and should be room in your life for both. And much to my own surprise, I would recommend this version of the game over the Switch port. It just plays better thanks to the reduced input lag, and it feels more stable all-around. The biggest snag here for most is going to be in the controls. You’ve got a choice between imperfect controller support or a non-customizable arrangement of virtual buttons. If that doesn’t bother you, I can heartily recommend this game. It’s great.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    I said it before, and I meant it: Moonlighter is a great game. It feels good to play, the soundtrack is great, and all my complaints are really quite minor. It is an interesting blend of dungeon crawler and shopkeep simulator, something not really delivered by other games that I have found. As a mobile port, it is excellent. Recommending it is easy, however with a twelve dollar price tag, it isn’t something everyone can or should pick up without second thought. Nevertheless, if you’re on the fence and have previously enjoyed games from both of the genres it pulls from, it’s definitely worth a shot.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Overall, Forager on iOS is a bit of a mixed bag. On its own, it is easy to recommend assuming you play with a controller because the touch controls aren’t great and there’s no real customization for them. However, if you already own Forager on another system and want a portable version, I’d recommend waiting for a patch to see if the control issues and UI get addressed. Forager itself is a must play as far as I’m concerned but the iOS port leaves a lot to be desired despite being more feature complete than most console-to-mobile ports.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If you enjoyed the previous Sniper Elite games, this one is a no-brainer. Sniper Elite 4 carries forward all of the strengths of the previous games and adds in a number of improvements, making for one of the finest stealth action experiences you can get on the Nintendo Switch. Admittedly, there aren’t a whole lot of traditional stealth games on the system, but I think that even if there were this would still be worth checking out. The only real miss is in its rather bland story, but the little stories of your own that you make as you play compensate for it. Overall, an enjoyable experience of the type and quality we don’t see often on the platform.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    As run-and-gun games go, Gunslugs isn’t the fanciest fellow around. Especially on the Switch, which plays host to some absolutely outstanding games in the genre. Still, there’s something about this game that makes it inviting to slip into when I’m just looking to relax. Perhaps it’s the simplicity of it all. You’re just running, gunning, and doing a little jumping. It’s not particularly difficult and you can enjoy it without concentrating too hard. I like the way it controls, I like the constant stream of changing weapons, and I even like the odd visual style. A mindless bit of carnage for whenever the mood strikes you, one that works as well here as it did on mobile years ago.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The battle system is simple, but reasonably engaging and strategic. On the other hand, exploration is basically just moving from node to node on a map, fighting the occasional battle or watching an event play out. The visuals are okay, but they feel very budget. Indeed, that’s the feeling I get from the game as a whole. When you consider what twenty dollars can get you RPG-wise on the eShop, that’s not a good thing.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    I don’t dislike the game. It’s serviceable. There’s a reasonably interesting job system to tinker with, and while the soundtrack is a bit thin what’s here is very good. Dragon Lapis is the kind of game that I could recommend to some if it were half the price it’s going for on Switch, but at fifteen dollars I don’t think it does anywhere near enough to justify its cost.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s not quite as novel, but No More Heroes 2 has the same swagger and charm that permeated the original. I wouldn’t recommend skipping the original title, but if you enjoy it you will certainly be happy with this follow-up. The Switch port is solid and helps address most of the technical issues the Wii version had. Good, stupid fun.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This Switch version carries things over nicely. You can use buttons or touch controls, and while the original version was built for screens of a different aspect ratio, you can barely tell. A special tip of the hat to the writing. There are some very talented authors working at Tin Man Games, and they went all-out here. It shows.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    If you’ve played it before, I don’t think you’re going to get much out of this version other than a format shift. But if it’s new to you, I think it’s as good as a brand-new game. You will definitely get your money’s worth out of it, just as much as someone would have when it released on the Wii U. It’s a wonderful game that a lot of people missed out on due to when and where it released, and I think it’s great that it’s now available to a considerably wider audience.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Simple, functional, reasonably amusing, but nothing we haven’t seen a thousand times before: that’s Crazy BMX World. This is essentially a stage-based auto-runner where you need to speed up, slow down, jump, and double-jump as needed to make it to the goal. You also need to try to collect three medals in each stage, as you’ll need them to make progress. You’ll earn gacha tickets for clearing stages, which can be exchanged for new bikes and costumes. There really isn’t much to this, but what’s here largely works as you would expect. My only gripe is that it’s sometimes hard to keep an eye on your little dude against the colorful and busy backdrops. For the price, this is fine.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Overall, Cafe Enchante is yet another excellent otome game. It is a perfect entry point into the genre and a great game on its own right. After Piofiore, which definitely went to some dark places, Cafe Enchante is a refreshing experience that feels like a nice cappuccino with its gorgeous art, amazing soundtrack, and well told story that is longer than expected.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Overall, this is by far the most impressive of all of Feral Interactive’s iOS conversions yet. Given how awful XCOM 2 was at launch on PS4 for me and how it runs on current consoles, I’m more than impressed with the iOS version and can safely recommend it above the consoles as an alternative to those who want the full XCOM 2 experience and don’t want to play on PC with the caveat about the visuals. The XCOM 2 Collection is a joy to play on iPad Pro and I can’t wait to see where the port goes over the next few months with potential updates and maybe even potential features brought in.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    At $9.99 Raiders of the North Sea offers a really solid gameplay experience in a well put together package. I would say the primary audience for this app, like most board game apps, is the travelling board gamer who isn't interested in lugging their entire collection along with them. We need to see more board game apps like this one. Not just that prime target is satisfied, but also a wider array of folks with features like online play and a simple and easy to use interface. If you like board games that emphasize strategy over randomness or board games that feature vikings, or just worker placement games, this is a great one to pick up.

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