TouchArcade's Scores

  • Games
For 3,810 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 23% same as the average critic
  • 27% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 78
Highest review score: 100 Battleheart
Lowest review score: 20 Legends of Heropolis
Score distribution:
3816 game reviews
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    This is a textbook example of how a poor port can ruin what a game is trying to get across. The Switch version of As Far As The Eye suffers from numerous bugs that significantly impede attempts to play it, and decisions like tiny text and not allowing touch controls would cause issues even if everything was running smoothly. These problems stack on top of a game that already had its fair share of flaws in its original form to wash away most of the goodwill from its more clever moments. If you’re looking for a unique strategic survival game, you may want to give As Far As The Eye a chance, but I can’t recommend doing it on Switch.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Those who enjoy a good narrative adventure will want to consider picking up Citizen Sleeper. It’s a very humble game in a lot of ways, but there’s plenty to dig into here if you give it a shot. The range of choices allowed me to feel like I had some agency over my character and their new life, and the dice mechanic added a pleasant random element to keep things interesting. A very cool slice of cyberpunk storytelling.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even with all of the frustrations I had with the platforming in Arise: A Simple Story, everything else here is so good that I feel good about recommending it. The emotional journey is outstanding, and unlike a lot of other narrative-focused games, Arise packs in a lot of gameplay to go with the story. This Switch port makes some minor technical concessions, but it’s quite good on the whole. A straight run through will only take you a few hours, but hidden collectibles make it worth taking your time to explore. A Simple Story it is, but there’s something to be said for simplicity.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Like Andro Dunos 2 earlier this year, Ganryu 2 is a faithful sequel to a game that few ever expected to get a sequel to. In terms of gameplay, it goes well beyond the relatively humble design of the original, resulting in a title that fans of Shinobi and Strider will almost certainly take an interest in. It’s unfortunate, then, that even after at least one patch dedicated to addressing issues, this Switch version of Ganryu 2 has a number of problems that interfere with the gameplay. I’d love to give this a strong recommendation on the basis of the solid game behind the wonky performance, but I really can’t muster more than a weak nudge.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Having now played Nobody Saves the World on Xbox Series X, Switch, and PC, I would recommend the Switch version above the others for offering the ability to play at home or on the go with a competent port. The gameplay suits the pickup and play nature of the system as well. I’m going to keep chipping away towards completing every aspect of Nobody Saves the World on Switch, but I can’t imagine this won’t end up being my favorite DrinkBox Studios release so far. I hope it gets a physical release down the line. If you’re looking for a charming action RPG that blends a bit of Zelda and Diablo together with its own signature style, Nobody Saves the World is for you.
    • tbd Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Youkai Douchuki is a game that I could understand anyone enjoying. It has a pleasantly odd theme, and the gameplay mechanics are largely straightforward and easy to pick up. It’s a very challenging game, but such things aren’t unusual in the arcade end of the pool. On the other hand, it’s also not much of a stand-out. The arcade scene had plenty of run-and-gun platformers, and there’s nothing about this one that really speaks to me. Decent, but not much more than that. [Early Access Provisional Score = 60]
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Being a shoot-em-up with an emphasis on racking up a high score, Gaplus is well-positioned to take advantage of the extra modes and online leaderboards that are a standard part of the Arcade Archives package. If you enjoy Galaga, I’m confident you’ll also really have a good time with this under-the-radar sequel. As single-screen shooters go, it’s frankly one of the better ones.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The action is great, the presentation is outstanding, and there’s really very little like it out there. The West missed out on this back in the day, so don’t let it slip past you now.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    With Pac-Land being as early an example of the genre as it is, it’s obviously not going to hold up to some of the fancier platformers out there. But it’s not a bad little game all on its own, regardless of which control set-up you opt for. The colorful, chipper presentation is appealing, and that triumphant trip back through the stage after dropping off the fairy is a fun touch. It’s unfortunate that the included version isn’t the one the North American audience will remember, but it plays the same and in this case that’s not a bad thing at all.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Wonder Momo‘s theme is its most memorable aspect, with the gameplay being a bit on the ordinary side. Beat-em-up fans likely won’t find much to sink their teeth into here, and the scoring system doesn’t really lend itself well to jostling elbows with others on the leaderboard. Still, it’s charming in its own way and certainly evocative of a particular era. That may be enough for some.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Raven’s Hike plays well, has some great level designs, and manages to feel fresh from start to finish. If you like tricky action games, you should give this one a shot. Just be warned that it doesn’t take long before it starts swinging hard.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Indeed, my biggest knock on Get Packed is that there isn’t a whole ton to the campaign. You can wrap it up in a single evening, and unless you’re interested in chasing high scores it’s over all too quickly. The minigames are actually pretty fun and help extend the joy a while longer, but I certainly hope to see more of the core content added via expansions or something in the future. An entertaining game to play with your friends or family, regardless of their level of skill.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If you’ve tried out the previous Sniper or Zombie Army games from Rebellion and bounced off of them, there is likely nothing here that will change your mind. Similarly, if you’ve enjoyed any of those games you will be happy with what you get here. Zombie Army 4: Dead War is more of what Rebellion has shown it knows how to do best: realistic playgrounds filled with plenty of action, stealth, exploration, and thrilling opportunities to exercise the capabilities of your arsenal. A solid port of a very satisfying game.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While the visual and performance cutbacks are ones I expected going from PS5 to Switch, Bugsnax not making full use of the Switch’s unique hardware capabilities is disappointing. I was hoping we’d get gyro control options or proper HD rumble to try and offer more immersion, but neither are present in this release. You do get the complete game with the Isle of Bigsnax right from the start though. If you already played Bugsnax on another platform, you should stick to that one to experience the new content, but for those who haven’t jumped into Snacktooth Island yet, the Nintendo Switch version of Bugsnax is a fine way to do so. I’ve thoroughly enjoyed putting in more than 20 hours into it on Nintendo Switch and Switch Lite.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    My first impression of this game was how pretty it was. It’s got a nice sense of style to it, and I love the odd creatures that inhabit this world. My second impression involved getting stuck in a piece of the environment and having to reset the game. My third impression of the game is that while it’s relatively short it somehow manages to wear out all of its tricks well before it ends, and alternates between being boring and irritating in its back half. That first bug wasn’t the only one to rear its head either. There’s something worth getting into here, but there’s just too much dragging the overall experience down.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While you are partially at the mercy of random elements, there’s a great degree of agency in how your chosen heroes and their abilities work together. I think the core game here is just as good as titles like Slay the Spire or Monster Train, but the Switch conversion leaves a bit to be desired. Play it elsewhere if you can, but if you enjoy the genre and only have a Switch, you’ll probably be able to put up with this port’s issues.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Revita isn’t doing a whole lot that we haven’t seen bits of in other games before, if not necessarily in this exact combination. But it’s doing all of it rather well, with reliable controls, challenging and fun boss encounters, enough randomness to add spice but not so much to make it all a crapshoot, and interesting choices to make with your character’s growth during each run. Those looking for their next roguelite action game to conquer will want to give this one some consideration.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Despite the fact that 2008 is longer ago than most of us would like to admit, there is still some fun to be had with Star Wars: The Force Unleashed. Some may have preferred a different version from the Wii one, but what it lacks in visual punch it more than makes up for with additional content and more focused level design. It’s an enjoyable, silly Star Wars adventure that probably isn’t going to flip the switches of anyone without affection for the brand, but will be a good enough time for fans to keep them from focusing on its many rough edges. A bit of a time warp, but not a bad one.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    This is less of a billiards game and more a pack of billiards puzzles. You get one hundred stages, and there are different sets of rules you’ll run into as you go. Sometimes you’re on your own and need to sink all the balls. Sometimes you’re playing for points against the computer. It comes off like a poor man’s Side Pocket, and that is already a bit of a value meal on its own in modern times. As if to hammer the point home, it’s full of unnecessary boosts you can buy with the coins you earn, a three-star ranking system, and a really awkward UI that feels ill-suited for button controls. Throw in some bugs, and you’ve got a scratch.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Blast Brigade vs the Evil Legion of Dr. Cread does just about everything a Metroidvania-style game should, and that makes it very easy to recommend to fans of the genre. I don’t think it’s going to convince anyone who is tired of this sort of game, because apart from its sense of humor it’s not really doing anything unusual for the genre. But what it does, it does well. The graphics are good, the controls are solid, the pacing and progression is more or less where it should be, the boss battles are enjoyable, and the map designs are good. It’s always fun when something so well-made as this comes seemingly out of nowhere.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Super Mega Zero manages the difficult job of finding new depths to plumb in a sub-genre that has seen a lot of love over the years. Every time I thought I had it all figured out, another stage would come along and force me to come at things completely differently. The changing number gimmick combines with some truly inspired puzzle and platforming challenges to create a truly enjoyable, incredibly tricky action game. Throw in the extra collectible Pi items and speed runs, and you’ve got a game that will last you for a long while.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Neptunia x SENRAN KAGURA: Ninja Wars doesn’t have much meat on the plate in most respects. There isn’t much depth to the action, and it’s over pretty quickly by the standards of Senran Kagura and especially Neptunia. The only area where it really goes beyond adequate is in the charming character interactions and amusing script. It would be nice if there was a little bit more here to enjoy, but I think for the fans of the brands, it’s enough. Those not already invested in either series will want to give this a pass, however.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    As puzzle games go, this is perhaps as casual as it gets. You’ve got pictures of cats and other animals all jumbled up, and you need to rotate the pieces until they create the desired image. You get forty of these puzzles in all. They get more complicated as you go, but they’re all just a matter of patience and fiddling around until lines line up. It’s cheap and chill, but I’d be lying if I said I didn’t wish it had a little more bite.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The controls are laggy. The load times are horrendous, sometimes as long as a minute and a half to start a simple exhibition game. It crashes sometimes. The AI for your teammates and goalkeeper is utterly incompetent. The classic controls ape the EA NHL Genesis layout, but map the A/B/C to B/A/X, putting a key action on the most awkward button on the controller. But the real kicker? Even when everything is going right, Bush Hockey League just doesn’t feel good to play. There’s so much obvious love put into this game by a team I am sure is full of big hockey fans, but that doesn’t change the end result.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Legend Of Ixtona isn’t a particularly great strategy RPG, but it’s not a bad one either. It’s short enough to plow through in a weekend, and just enjoyable enough to be worth doing just that. The weak AI makes it essentially a strategy RPG equivalent to a mindless button-masher. Those looking for any actual tactical challenge will probably want to keep on walking, but I think there’s a certain appeal to it if you get into the game’s story and quirky characters. That said, you can probably find better things in this genre on the Switch at a comparable price.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Feral Interactive have done a brilliant job here in bringing another true PC classic game to mobile devices. If you enjoy strategy games and don’t mind spending a bit of time adjusting to the interface, I can’t imagine anything better for you than Total War: MEDIEVAL II. I enjoyed my time with Total War: MEDIEVAL II on iPad a lot more than iPhone though. If I had a bigger screen on my iPhone, I might’ve enjoyed it more, but the iPad Pro version looks and feels amazing.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    To sum up, I like every game included in this set, but I only truly love a few of them. That’s a problem in that I could just go and buy those few separately and keep twenty bucks in my pocket. I like the Arcade Archives quality, but I can’t help but feel a bit disappointed with how flavorless the package comes across as a whole. It’s ten Arcade Archives games dumped in a box with a simple menu to choose between them. A better selection would make this an easier recommendation, but as is I think it’s only suited for Taito die-hards and those looking for an Arcade Archives sample platter.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sumire is a game I’ve convinced a lot of people to play on Nintendo Switch, and I hope to do the same on iOS. Despite the few issues with the port right now, it is still worth experiencing if you enjoy emotional stories. The highlights initially may seem like the visuals and amazing soundtrack, but Sumire is a game I want to see more of in the future from GameTomo. I look forward to seeing how this version improves through updates, but I’m glad to have been able to play Sumire on another platform and still hope it gets a physical release on Nintendo Switch in the future.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Slipstream has a lot to offer fans of SEGA’s old Super Scaler arcade games. It’s not shy about its source of inspiration, but it is dutiful in doing justice to that game. There are a variety of modes to play and sights to see. You can even play with friends in local multiplayer. Just be aware that the game plays like something from the time and place it pays homage to, so you very much have to take it on its own terms mechanically. Perhaps the biggest problem is that it never really manages to escape being one big reference and become its own thing. Even with that in mind, arcade racing fans likely won’t regret picking it up.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Be warned: Kombinera is quite tough. It starts getting demanding fairly early on, and figuring out the trick to each stage and successfully pulling it off aren’t an easy matter even in the initial set of stages. Simply reaching the end is an effort in and of itself, and trying to complete all of the various additional objectives, target times, and achievements will take a lot of practice and patience. There are three hundred levels in all, making for a monster-sized puzzler. If that all sounds good to you, then you may enjoy this game at least as much as I did.

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