TV Guide Magazine's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 7,073 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Rear Window
Lowest review score: 0 The Wild Life
Score distribution:
7073 movie reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Peter Askin's powerful documentary serves as an important reminder of our First Amendment rights, and a tribute to one man who fought to preserve them in the face of Congressional intimidation.
  1. It's dramatically unsatisfying.
  2. It's a light, silly instantly forgettable comedy peppered with action set-pieces and affectionate nods to its fondly remembered predecessor, including a gracious end-credits dedication to the late Don Adams and Edward Platt.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 25 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Adam Sandler can breathe a sigh of relief: Thanks to this crude, bafflingly unfunny comedy from fellow SNL alum Mike Myers, Sandler can rest assured that his "You Don't Mess With The Zohan" won't go down as the worst movie of 2008.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    A truly fresh take on the romantic comedy: It's as sad as it is funny, and the boy-girl match so misbegotten you can't help but pray it won't work out in the end. Call it an anti-rom-com, and see it if you can.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    It's fun, fast-paced, educational entertainment that's fit for the whole family -- American boys included.
  3. Restrained and decorous to a fault.
  4. M. Night Shyamalan's sixth film mines a rich lode of end-of-the-world-as-we-know-it clichés, but while the set up is spooky, the development is heavy handed and marred by Shyamalan's inability to write natural-sounding dialogue or convincing characters.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    The dialogue is minimal but sharp, the pace swift and the action sequences suitably loud and brutal.
  5. A subtle, unsparing portrait of families whose fragile dynamics fray under pressure. Its strength lies in the complexity with which the characters are written.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    So it should come as no surprise that what Maddin eventually produced is a film about HIS Winnipeg, a psychological terrain that's no more -- nor less -- "real" than William Carlos William's Paterson or Marcel Proust's Combray.
  6. The story eventually resolves itself a little too neatly, but it never devolves into a freak show or a fable, thanks in large part to Farmiga and Stahl's deft, quirky performances.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    A deranged penguin is seen racing toward his certain doom amid the crags of a mountain range. It may not be "Happy Feet," but Herzog has made a penguin movie after all.
  7. Beautifully animated, the celebrity voice performances are terrific, and the action sequences negotiate the fine line between being physically convincing and becoming too intense for the young children.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 25 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    At a time when the images of Arab-Americans are already largely negative, do we really need more violently temperamental, bomb throwing men in turbans and beards?
  8. A cute, slight tale.
  9. While rich in ethnographic detail, the film ultimately recalls nothing more than pulp fictions like Robert E. Howard’s "Conan the Barbarian," which validate their worship of ubermensch-ian brawn by way of sad tales of childhood victimization.
  10. A crude, artless bogey tale.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Conrad's script surprises at nearly every turn.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Dreams With Sharp Teeth Or, Why is Harlan Ellison so gosh darned angry?
  11. For all her own frustrations, Davenport is honest enough not to gloss over the fact that what Muthana's adventures in the screen trade taught him was to hustle, toady and ingratiate himself to useful people. And she helped.
  12. This scrappy, ultra-low budget comedy, made in 19 days for $70,000 by North Carolina School of the Arts graduates Jody Hill, Danny McBride and Ben Best, comes with its own Cinderella tale: It debuted at the 2006 Sundance Film Festival but failed to find distribution until comedian Will Ferrell and his business partner, Adam McKay, championed it.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Has everything one could ask of a true-crime expose.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    It's a mainstreamed, big-screen version of the bowdlerized, endlessly syndicated version of the show, not the raunchy original.
  13. There's nothing more to it than meets the eye, but Bertino understands the mechanics of suspense and knows how to use them.
  14. The film is flat-out gorgeous and contains moments of sheer lunacy.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    A drum-tight, extremely grisly thriller. And odd as it may sound given the subject matter, it's also surprisingly funny.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    This formulaic adventure pays tribute to George Hogg, a true hero largely forgotten everywhere but China, where a statue of him now stands -- a rare honor for a westerner.
  15. Postal's touches of wit are lost in the flying body parts, gross-out gags, and the full frontal spectacle of Foley's no-longer-private parts.
  16. The trouble with this satirical take US involvement in Iraq, penned by Mark Leyner, John Cusack and Jeremy Pikser, is that the real thing is equally absurd and only marginally less funny.

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