Twinfinite's Scores

  • Games
For 1,271 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 7% same as the average critic
  • 46% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 74
Highest review score: 100 Elden Ring
Lowest review score: 20 Super Duper Party Pooper
Score distribution:
1274 game reviews
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The new DLC is a great example of quality over quantity and is an easy blanket recommendation for any fans of the original game. Newcomers, however, may want to do their homework before pulling the trigger. Because like the devil at the heart of Cuphead, The Delicious Last Course demands your blood, sweat, and soul… where do we sign up?
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Sunbreak represents the very best of Monster Hunter Rise, recontextualizing the base game through its clever integration of the old and the new. It won’t convert die-hard fans that bounced off of Rise, but for those that loved the changes to the Monster Hunter formula, Sunbreak represents a new high water mark for the series and is an absolute no-brainer for anyone looking to dive back in.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    F1 22 is another solid instalment in Codemasters’ Formula 1 simulation series, even if the tweaks to the on-track gameplay aren’t all that noticeable. It feels very much an annual EA sports title.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    While TMNT: Shredder’s Revenge isn’t going to revolutionize the genre, it honestly shouldn’t have to. The modernized upgrades it received to its combat, style, and co-op are more than enough to warrant praise. As they say, if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it, and that’s exactly what you’ve got with TMNT: Shredder’s Revenge.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Three Hopes serves up a fun story that will definitely please a lot of Three Houses fans, and despite a few character missteps here and there, it's well worth experiencing. Just be careful not to fall to the dark side.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Ultimately, AI: The Somnium Files – nirvanA Initiative is a detective story that needs to be experienced. If you’re a fan of Japanese mystery games such as the Zero Escape series or the Danganronpa games (by the same developer/publisher), Nirvana Initiative is definitely something you shouldn’t pass up. The only thing better is that if you haven’t experienced the first game in the series, you get to go back and experience another terrific detective tale.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    I clearly adored my time with OlliOlli World: Void Riders. New features like Tractor Beams add to the landscape so much, somehow managing to improve upon the perfect 2.5D skateboarding mechanics and momentum that the base game provides. Praise Nebulord – and Roll7 and Private Division – for this gnarly addition to an amazing game.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Whatever the path may hold, all that players can and would experience in Card Shark is beautifully put together, with a fascinating narrative matched by a vibrant and outstanding aesthetic, and propped up by wonderfully inventive gameplay that puts the player in the eye of the storm. In fact, it almost feels like the game has everything stacked in its favor, just like the different plots at play in the quiet confines of high society.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There's no doubt that fans of the franchise will enjoy jumping back in. The promise of a gradual release of new content will likely keep diehards of the series drawn in with each new announcement. Overall, Mario: Strikers Battle League is a good game that needs more to do. It may be a much better game a year from now, but right now it is noticeably lacking content.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Quarry is an easy recommendation for players who have been watching campy horror movies for years, wishing they could make all the smart decisions that would obviously keep everyone alive. Or, you know, the psychos who just want to watch the world burn.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    The game tries to include many of the hallmarks of the genre, but muddles it all up with poor systems and execution. For a fan that has grown used to the genre’s often challenging requirements, recommending Dolmen is something that will only happen in an alternate dimension.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    At the end of the day, I’d still recommend Dislyte to anyone looking for a truly unique gacha game with striking character designs and a cool aesthetic. The team-building aspect is on point, and the entire vibe of the game just oozes charm and style. Just keep your wallets closed until we see some tangible improvements in those pull rates.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Brigandine: The Legend of Runersia is a good addition to a genre that is gaining popularity. While it may lack the accessibility or even the swifter pace of other titles, it still manages to deliver a strategy roleplaying experience that is largely good on all fronts, supported by six distinct kingdoms and storylines. As long as you can accept that it might feel repetitive in a long game, Brigandine: The Legend of Runersia is an experience worth trying out.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The gameplay mechanics and open world that felt fresh and fun in 2017 now feel outdated and stale. Combine this with levels that lack interesting vantage points or unique ways to kill enemies, and it wasn’t long before my immersion into the wacky world of Sniper Elite 5 went up in smoke.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    When it comes down to it, Out of the Park Baseball 23 is still the king of baseball management simulation. There are certainly some rough spots that could be smoothed out like in the in-game animations, some quality of life changes in simulation, and fleshing out the tutorials a bit more. But none of those change the fact that this is a fantastic game that any baseball fan and general stat nerd could enjoy.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Eternal Threads is still a solid game, though. I commend the writing team for nailing the characters’ behaviors and how they all balance each other. Moreover, the time manipulation mechanics are easy to use and not complicated to sift through for specific events. But it does falter in the gameplay department a bit, becoming repetitive and not all that engaging outside of opening the occasional locked door.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even so, there’s just no denying the charm of Evil Dead: The Game. It’s a brilliant encapsulation of what made the movies so iconic and beloved, and it just oozes humor and delicious campiness at every turn. It’s still fairly rare for games attached to some sort of entertainment IP to do well, but I’d say Evil Dead’s already off to a groovy start.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If you're looking for a solid, story-driven adventure, then Vampire: The Masquerade - Swansong is a must-play in 2022, even if you haven't played the original.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The Centennial Case: A Shijima Story is an exceptional grouping of semi-connected detective stories. Experiencing a whodunnit while marginally helping piece the mystery together was a great combination. While much of the investigations are too guided, getting to watch the suspects react as you place down piece after piece of evidence is completely worth it. The game never works better than it does when you just get to sit back and enjoy watching the story unfold.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There are definitely issues that need to be ironed out in terms of the battle royale gameplay quality, but whether you’re in it for the new TDM mode, exclusive Legend, third-person option, or even just some new cosmetics, there’s bound to be something here that gets players excited — or interested, at the very least.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Suffice it to say though, Warhammer 40k: Chaos Gate – Daemonhunters is a fantastic video game, a game of the year contender, that demands attention in a genre that is now synonymous with XCOM. Daemonhunters’ twist on the formula is unique, and the 40k setting is the perfect backdrop for this kind of game. I look forward to further entries in what I hope is a burgeoning new series, and whatever it is Complex Games works on next.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Spending about six to eight hours in this version of Lithuania is most certainly a trip worth having, even if it is clear that Tag of Joy is setting things up for a sequel. While the narrative rushes through the endgame in a somewhat haphazard fashion, it does not necessarily undo the great work that has paved the way forward to its conclusion. An intriguing tale of adventure that does not necessarily reinvent the wheel, Crowns and Pawns: Kingdom of Deceit pays homage to its predecessors while creating a modern experience that should appeal to fans, young or old.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At the end of the day, it is quite impossible to look at Eiyuden Chronicle: Rising without thinking ahead to Hundred Heroes. On its own, it is a capable action-JRPG that looks great, with solid combat and platforming to keep players distracted from completing repetitive quests, but as part of the larger universe, it lays an inviting foundation for what is to come with well-realized characters amid a larger unfolding conflict. And as someone hoping for that Suikoden magic to be recaptured, New Neveah becomes an irresistible world to spend time in.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As it stands, Salt and Sacrifice continues to nail down all of the moving parts and elements that go into creating an impressive Souls-like game. For most players –especially those just discovering the genre for the first time– this is an easy recommendation. But for the rest of us, it’s not quite enough anymore.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Trek to Yomi feels like a victim of its own cinematic inspirations and artistic ambitions. While satisfying at times, the combat is ultimately pretty one-note and begins to outstay its welcome by the time you’ve reached the end of Hiroki’s journey. I’m a sucker for artistically driven indie experiences, but there’s got to be some strong gameplay forming a foundation for it, and I can’t say I overly enjoyed my time accompanying Hiroki on his quest for vengeance.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    In light of Loot River’s shortcomings, it’s still a worthwhile title to play. Flicking Tetris blocks through an astonishingly fluid river is so satisfying. And while I have issues with the combat, the weapons and spells are fun to use when they work. If Loot River gained a roadmap of good changes and content to add to the pile, it could stand toe-to-toe with some heavy-hitters leading the genre. Though, if it stays the way it is, it will remain a good entry but miss out on becoming better at implementing its inspirations.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Nintendo Switch Sports attempts to capture the magic of the first two games in the series. Its efforts in doing so are not bad per se, but they are extremely basic and do not build upon the previous concepts in any revolutionary way.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The potential was certainly there, with the unique Mesoamerican inspirations, beautiful art, and top-notch animations, so it’s unfortunate that I’m left feeling like this was somewhat of a missed opportunity.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    At the end of the day, it’s hard to say whether Serious Sam: Tormental deserves your time and attention. As a twin-stick shooter, it’s designed well and works to provide enjoyable gameplay for anyone looking for something simple. But when compared to its peers, it’s just not that special or unique that would warrant an extended amount of time spent on it, even if you happened to be a big Serious Sam fan.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    MLB The Show 22 is a fantastic baseball simulator that fans of the sport will enjoy. Unfortunately, there aren’t enough notable changes to the game that make it a must-have. There are some little tweaks here and there that dedicated players will notice, but the total package isn’t too different. That said, it’s still worth picking up if baseball is your game.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Unless you are a big fan, The House of the Dead: Remake is not the best way to experience this classic for the first time, and it would have probably been better off dead than revived in this form.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even with a weaker fighting system, though, The Kaito Files is more than worth the purchase for any fan of the series. Fantastic writing, enjoyable characters, and a gripping narrative make this experience another highlight in the series, more than proving that Kaito is worthy of being a protagonist.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The game feels like it’s meant for those who miss the GBA-era glory days, and it may just satisfy if these particular limiting factors can be overlooked. And, with all that said, it’s certainly a step in the right direction when looking toward the future of a genre that’s more or less being monopolized by Pokemon.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While LEGO Star Wars: The Skywalker Saga is more of an evolution of the franchise than a full on revolution, it’s still quite possibly the definitive Star Wars video game collection right now, not only from a content perspective, but from an authenticity and a fun factor perspective as well. Equally charming as it is nostalgic, it’s a wonderful experience, especially for those with a soft spot for that galaxy far, far away.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Overall, I am happy to have a modern way to play Chrono Cross and Radical Dreamers. Could Square Enix have polished this up a bit more to fit the standards of a remaster in 2022? Absolutely. Is Chrono Cross still a stellar game regardless? Absolutely. I am eager to play through it again in New Game+ to make different decisions and recruits.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    In essence, In Nightmare is a narrative heavy puzzle game where all too often you must engage in more action heavy scenes in order to progress. That, coupled with frequent sections where you must navigate a room of either a single monster or multiple and avoid detection, caused the game to wear out its welcome sooner than it should have. When it’s just puzzles where you have have all the time in the world to reason out is when the game works best, and I found myself wishing for more of that as the game went on.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Hardware limitations and frustrations aside, Moss: Book II is another resounding success for Polyarc, despite a few strange missteps in finnicky weapon switching and minor quality of life tweaks that could come as part of a future update. The collectibles provide ample reason to keep playing after you’ve finished the story, and the puzzle-based environments are just as beautiful to look at as they are a satisfying enigma to crack.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If you’re looking for a cute, fun game or need a palate cleanser from difficult titles like Sifu and Elden Ring, then Kirby and the Forgotten Land came at the perfect time.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    This is one game that is certainly worth checking out, if only for the setting and story premise, and if you could find some way to look beyond the less than ideal conditions of the gameplay segments, then perhaps you already possess the necessary steel and nerve to make it in the Weird West.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The biggest issue you could perhaps point to with Relayer is that it really isn’t for everyone. If you don’t enjoy visual novels, if you aren’t into turn-based games, or if you hate anime tropes, this game likely isn’t for you. If, however, you enjoy your anime, mecha, turn-based tactics, and a deep and interesting story with a rich cast of attractive characters, it’s easy to recommend Relayer. It’s really as close to a playable sci-fi anime as it gets, and I’m all for it.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While the gameplay felt familiar, Tiny Tina and the rest of the main cast carry this one on their backs through witty, fun dialogue that stayed consistently entertaining throughout the campaign. The banter, fantasy setting, and TTRPG concept really created so much more enjoyment than I expected to find here.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Long-time fans of the series might be disappointed, but it is at least check the same boxes that all of the other titles in this niche genre do. More casual players will probably just want to pass on this entirely, as the pros won’t outweigh the cons.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Ghostwire: Tokyo is a must-play for anyone who loves action-adventure, even with some less than inventive design choices for its structure. And even though it is set in a city where the only other inhabitants are spirits, yokai, and The Visitors, everything about Ghostwire: Tokyo feels so alive. It has fantastic stories, a rich setting, and addictive gameplay that keeps getting better as the game progresses.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Dawn of Ragnarok might be Valhalla’s largest campaign expansion by scale, but I didn’t enjoy it nearly as much The Wrath of the Druids and even The Siege of Paris. Unless you’re a hardcore Valhalla fan or someone who is particularly enamored with finding a collecting the (admittedly cool-looking) new armor sets, wait for this one to go on sale to satiate your craving to plunder.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Every once in a while, a true indie gem comes along. A classic for the ages lauded by critics and players alike. One inspired by classics, taking their best mechanics before refining and crafting something wholly unique and simply unforgettable, for better and occasionally, for worse. After more than 15 hours of deciphering cryptic clues and losing myself in its meticulously-crafted, mysterious world, Tunic has cemented itself in that bracket of all-time indie classics, and one that you simply have to play.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    As it stands, this is a tough one to recommend as long as the bugs persist, but it may be worth checking out after a patch or two to resolve the more blatant issues.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Stranger of Paradise is a peanut butter and chocolate combination of Final Fantasy XV and Nioh. The beauty of it is that you don’t even have to be a fan of Final Fantasy I to enjoy Stranger of Paradise. The story explains everything you need to know and anything you bring into it from previous knowledge is just extra. The combat is just spicy enough that you can feel like a powerhouse, but lets the players somewhat tweak the difficulty to their own desires if they’d rather face a tougher challenge. If this is the way that Square Enix will be remaking the early Final Fantasy games I am entirely in. This iteration takes modernization to the best possible level.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even with slight hiccups like this, I still adored my time with Far: Changing Tides.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The true problem of Babylon’s Fall is that it has no sense of identity. There’s nothing that sets it apart from games like it, and it only shows itself as a poor comparison to other, free, games. Babylon’s Fall feels like it was made to check a box, because it is just so empty and slapped together. The cookie-cutter levels only serve to wear you down as you just want to make it through main missions that are just about your only way to play the game.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Gran Turismo 7 is looking like it could be the best racing game of 2022. There are so many other superlatives you can go with for this game like it’s the best-looking PS5 game or it’s one of the best PlayStation exclusives of this generation so far, but the important thing is that the game is just straight-up fun. Despite a few stumbles here and there, the shine of Gran Turismo 7 greatly exceeds the negatives and makes it a must-have for anyone that’s looking for their next PS5 title.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    I’m a huge fan of this HD-2D style approach Square Enix is taking with these games. Octopath Traveler looked like a souped-up Final Fantasy VI, and similarly, Triangle Strategy looks like a souped-up Final Fantasy Tactics with more modern mechanics and UI. I think fans of the genre are going to really appreciate what Triangle Strategy has going for it, even if the character development could use a bit more work. And for genre newcomers or those less familiar with it like myself, this is a fantastic entry point with an engaging story to keep you hooked.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The freedom ELEX II allows through the traversal mechanics is something that I have never encountered before in a game like this but will now always think about going forward.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The development team has to be applauded for pushing the boundary of the horror industry with its ideas. It’s just a shame that it stumbles so heavily when it comes to the execution and dilutes its strongest element with generic, repetitive gameplay.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    As an open-world skeptic who was pretty much convinced that the Souls formula wouldn't work in such a setting, I'm happy to have been proven wrong. Elden Ring retains the heart of what makes FromSoft's action RPGs so compelling, and takes things to a whole other level by pulling the best elements from their older games and improving upon them in this one.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ultimately, it’s a great game that will almost inevitably become even better with time, but the launch package won’t disappoint fans of either franchise involved. Especially Warhammer Fans are in for a treat, with new lore and new heroes providing a ray of hope for a better future after quite a few bleak years.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Horizon Forbidden West is a spectacular sequel to one of the PS4's best exclusives. Its narrative is one of its strengths, with unforgettable characters and twists and turns that maintain a solid pace throughout, and it's combat has been expanded on, adding in new weapon and ammo types to make eliminating machines and humans an immensely satisfying experience. All of this is wrapped up in a world that feels more alive and meticulously crafted than its predecessor with visuals and animations that bring that special blockbuster feel Sony's exclusives are now renowned for to the PS5.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Unlike, say, Monster Train or Rise of the Slime, Castle Morihisa is much more of a straight up retread of Slay The Spire, which is simultaneously its strongest asset and its Achilles’ heel at the same time. While fans of the genre will find it hard not to love, and though its structure is built upon another game’s foundations, that doesn’t mean you can’t have a helluva fun time scaling your way to the top of its spire.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Lost Ark might be one of the most banal games you’ll ever come across if you’re just looking at it from a narrative point of view, but it’s a prime example of how good gameplay and combat can carry the entire experience. Sometimes, all it takes is the appeal of watching your tiny numbers gradually grow into big numbers for you to get hooked on a game.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    I have no doubt that a lot of people are going to love that the game is super difficult, especially if you enjoyed Absolver, but I am just not one of those people.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Anyone who loved the first two games is going to go nuts for this one, as it kickflips the franchise forward in just about every way.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    I enjoyed my time with Dying Light 2 and found it an entertaining open-world experience that I want to keep playing beyond the 30 or so hours I put into the main storyline.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    While Endwalker fails to eclipse Shadowbringers in most areas, it succeeds in what is by far its most important mandate: properly ending this extremely long storyline in an incredibly satisfying way. It’s a solid tale from start to finish. The expansion adds beautiful new areas, well-constructed new jobs, and all in all, ticks off everything that you want a Final Fantasy XIV expansion to do with the level of polish that players have come to expect. So take a deep breath Final Fantasy XIV fans, Endwalker is fantastic.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If you can overlook the limited available modes and move past the potentially devastating feeling of being one-turn-killed online, Master Duel is a Yu-Gi-Oh! game that will allow you to build — and more importantly, defend against — a deck of that caliber.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    How much do you want to replay Uncharted 4 and The Lost Legacy? That's the question you've got to ask yourself right now. If your gaming docket is looking pretty rammed, then this is one you can probably pass on for the time being. However, if you just can't get enough of Nate, Sam, Chloe, Nadine and Sully, then this one just about warrants a purchase. It's the definitive way to experience these PS4 masterpieces, and has me dreaming about the possibilities of a true PS5 Uncharted title.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Overall, Windjammers 2 is a massive success that fans of the franchise will surely enjoy and those new to the game will quickly understand why the fans of the original game love it. The lack of game modes with meaningfully different gameplay is unquestionably disappointing. Yet, the core gameplay is just so good and enjoyable that hours will pass in the blink of an eye.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While I had some grievances with the Threat Levels for solo players, and had wished for a few more objectives to bolster the current roster and help reduce the monotony of playing multiple Incursions in a single session, I kept finding -- and continue to find -- myself eagerly wanting to hop back on and earn level up my Operators a little bit more. Just how long this feeling continues to linger at the back of my mind, ultimately comes down to whether any post-launch updates will come to the progression to make it feel more rewarding and less grinding.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It still excels, in every sense of the word. From story and gameplay to visuals and soundtrack, this game has it all.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is the evolution the series needed and provides a promising foundation for the future of the series.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If you have a few hours to spend and want to play something that is unlike anything else this year, then Solar Ash is absolutely worth checking out. Anyone who is a fan of the action-adventure genre will no doubt enjoy this memorable experience.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Danganronpa Decadence has been a long time coming. The series itself is just such a perfect fit for the handheld device, and coming back to it has been such a joy. This is the kind of series that keeps you up at night, jabbing at your screen under the covers in the dark as you soak in every new bit of information, trying to unravel the mystery. It’s completely engrossing, and a wonderful addition to the Switch library.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Pokemon Brilliant Diamond and Shining Pearl have their flaws and are not particularly ambitious remakes, but they’re somehow still fun. I don’t regret the 25 hours I spent with the main story of Brilliant Diamond, and there is enough post-game content to keep me interested for a while longer. I just can’t help but wish that these gems shined just a little bit more brilliantly.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Pokemon Brilliant Diamond and Shining Pearl have their flaws and are not particularly ambitious remakes, but they’re somehow still fun. I don’t regret the 25 hours I spent with the main story of Brilliant Diamond, and there is enough post-game content to keep me interested for a while longer. I just can’t help but wish that these gems shined just a little bit more brilliantly.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It is clear that Ruined King: A League of Legends Story is a work of love, combining a well-written narrative, engaging characters, and a world worth exploring and experiencing. The combat elements add to a familiar formula, and the turn-based elements are not that hard for anyone to wrap their heads around. Save for a few yet annoying bugs and glitches, it is hard not to see Ruined King: A League of Legends Story as a bonafide breakout hit for Riot Forge and Airship Syndicate.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Battlefield 2042 is an excellent effort and filled with a ton of competitive multiplayer content at launch with much more planned in the near future. There are some technical issues such as respawns and visual bugs to sort out, and some game modes and specialists might need some tweaks, but DICE is off to a great start and Battlefield 2042 should likely be relevant and popular for years to come.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Sherlock Holmes Chapter One takes the series in a completely opposite direction of its predecessors, souring its potential in favor of adding gameplay elements that pad runtime and take away from the investigations. Fans of the series may find some joy in getting to experience the original content or solving clues the hard way, but I was certainly not one of them.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    For those looking for more of the same, Call of Duty: Vanguard does exactly that. It’s the same, great-feeling FPS with a fresh lick of WWII paint complete with all of the weapons, locales and caveats that come with it. It’s not a revolutionary entry for the series, but it’s not a particularly poor one, either.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At the end of the day, I'm not so sure that Shin Megami Tensei V really pushes the envelope forward for the series. It doesn't have the emotional brevity of the excellent Nocturne, nor does it present the same kind of moral quandaries that IV did. It certainly looks better and plays incredibly well, and from a gameplay perspective, this would easily be the most accessible entry of the bunch. It won't disappoint series fans, especially those who have been waiting for a series comeback for years, but it might be time for Atlus to think about where the series is headed next.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Forza Horizon 5 is a superb racing game. Despite these slight niggles it still manages to put a beaming smile on my face every time I go hurtling off a danger sign, masterfully overtake the leader of a race to snatch the victory, or perfect a drift. It's easily one of the best-looking games on the Xbox Series X, and its extensive roster of cars and events will ensure it's engine keeps quietly ticking over for months on end.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    With how the current controls and gameplay loop sit, though, I can’t find myself wanting to sit down and play this much longer after its release. Here is to hoping Ubisoft and Riders Republic get even more extreme in the future.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    When you’re climbing up to the fifth floor of a late-game dungeon while fighting battle after battle in a bland-looking environment, it’s tough to stay engaged or excited, even though it’s a relatively short experience overall.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    All in all, Mario Party Superstars is a good remake of some incredibly fantastic classic games. It looks great and plays just like the Mario Party games of years past. Sadly, it falls short of being a must-have for all Switch owners outside of Mario Party fans thanks to its relatively small and stagnant roster and board selection. But in the end, the wonderful gameplay is the biggest redeeming factor that makes Mario Party Superstars an enjoyable experience.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Making a debut on new hardware has its pros and cons, but for NHL 22, the overt emphasis on Superstar X-Factors was a huge gamble to take that did not pay off. If this is your first NHL game in a while, then there is a solid foundation in NHL 22 with various game modes that can appeal. For fans who are hoping for more, however, it is disappointing to find little to no improvements despite all the hype, just like a draft pick that turned out to be a lemon.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    I still found myself sinking hours at a time into the charming world of Moonglow without even realizing it. Its voxel art visuals are beautiful and the soundtrack is suitably chill. Moonglow Bay has been developed by a truly passionate team, one with so many great ideas that, in trying to implement them all, perhaps haven’t had the time or experience to flesh them out with the depth they truly deserve. Still, if the idea of saving a town through fishing sounds like your cup of tea, Moonglow Bay is worth checking out. Just be prepared for a rather simplistic ride.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At the end of the day, if you already liked The Dark Pictures games, you should really enjoy House of Ashes. Its story is unique, complex, interesting, and suspenseful without relying on cheap scares. If you didn’t like Little Hope or Man of Medan, but are still open to enjoying the series, House of Ashes is worth giving a shot.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    I can’t recommend New World to anyone who isn’t already 100% invested in the idea of faction politics and PvP, but there’s a solid foundation here. Give it an expansion or two, and this could turn into something truly special.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    I cannot recommend playing Marvel's Guardians enough for the experience it provides. Its decision to focus on story, characters, and ambiance instead of trying to throw in a bunch of content that pads the adventure results in an amazing game. It is right up there with the Arkham Trilogy and Marvel's Spider-Man as one of the best superhero video games of all time.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Metroid Dread takes risks for the series, but it succeeds in doing so. The ending was completely grand, and the interpretations of the final scenes will leave me thinking about the game for a long time to come.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In spite of its shortcomings, though, Back 4 Blood is already starting to feel like it could very well become my go-to zombie shooter whenever I just want to have a fun, social experience with friends. Despite how saturated the zombie game market has become, Back 4 Blood cuts through all the noise and delivers a solid co-op shooter that oozes charm and prioritizes fun with friends over everything else.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    In short, this game feels very much like a stepping stone on the way to a better Demon Slayer game in the future — one with a wider variety of playable characters, more new combat features, and a longer storyline that can afford to cut out filler moments that pad the experience.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    After 40 hours in, I’m still eager to hop back in, venturing further off the beaten path, clearing out any lingering FND Bases and checking out the Insurgency post-game content to grind out additional weapons and rewards. With a solid story, an engaging cast of characters, and a plethora of enthralling side content, Far Cry 6 is an easy recommendation for FPS fans.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Diablo 2: Resurrected Review – For the Faithful By Ed McGlone Published on September 30, 2021 Home » Reviews » Diablo 2: Resurrected Review – For the Faithful Share Tweet Night Mode Diablo 2 Resurrected on PC Diablo 2: Resurrected is a remaster simultaneously complex, and also incredibly simple. Visually, it’s a night and day difference between its predecessor, even on the Switch. But from a gameplay perspective, it is incredibly faithful, almost to a fault. Very little has been changed from the original release which will likely be music to the ears of the most hardcore Diablo 2 fans, resistant to change. In that sense, it’s a very “simple” upgrade. However, that decision not to use this opportunity to spruce things up may end up being a thorn at the side of newcomers and fans without rose-tinted glasses. Let’s talk about what Diablo 2: Resurrected gets right first. Visually Diablo 2: Resurrected is a triumph. It takes a very old game that looks, let’s face it, like ass by today’s standards, and turns it into something charming and wonderful to behold. By charming and wonderful, I of course mean gory, gothic, and dark with a new level of detail that was not possible in the original game. Fans wouldn’t have it any other way in that regard. Gameplay-wise, very little has changed because very little needed to change. Diablo 2 is still an all-time great game and that is still the case in Resurrected. All of the game’s classes are incredibly distinct from each other and each has a multitude of different play styles you can elect to spec into. There are Trap Assassins, Elementalist Assassins, Bow Amazons, Javasons, Werewolf Druids, Werebear Druids, Hammerdins, Whirlwind Barbs, Summoner Necros, and Bone Necros, Ice, Fire, and Thunder Sorceresses, I could go on and on. Layered on top of that are gear and set items that can further augment your gameplay and of course the fabled Runewords that players can chase to really perfect their builds. Leveraging all of that and creating your perfect character is definitely a grind. It’s a grind that may not make sense to an outsider, because at the end of the day you’re just running through the same content you did before, just faster, but those of us that love the genre do get it and love it for what it is. What’s great too is that players now have an easier way of getting to experience the lore, environment, and story of Diablo 2. Diablo 3 had a really compelling story that is heavily connected to the events of Diablo 2. While you can still enjoy Diablo 3 without having ever played its predecessor, it’s far more enjoyable if you do know fully what’s going on. And with Diablo 4 coming at some point in the future, it’s absolutely worth a single playthrough for the story and to experience this legendary game at least once, even if you’re not planning on staying a while or killing Baal 10,000 times. All of that said, while yes, Diablo 2 is still an excellent game, it never was a perfect game, and there are some issues that were forgivable back when it was originally released that stick out like sore thumbs now in Diablo 2: Resurrected. I have extremely fond memories of Diablo 2 going back to my days in middle school and high school. My friends and I would spend hours perfecting our magic find gear and mastering our speed runs through Mephisto and Baal to grind for better loot. The funny thing about memories, though, is that sometimes your brain selectively chooses to remember good ones, and deletes all of the bad ones. For example, I barely remembered that Stamina was even a thing, and yeah it’s very much a drag early on. While it improves over time as you pump up your Vitality, I can totally see fans that are not married to the idea of loving Diablo 2, getting frustrated very easily over it, and giving up on it before it starts to resolve itself. If the frequent battles with your Stamina in the early game don’t scare players away, the inventory management might. This is another Diablo 2 memory I subconsciously left behind apparently. I do not remember having to constantly go into my inventory to either drop stuff, or go back and forth to town to stash and sell items as often as I apparently need to while playing Diablo 2: Resurrected. Did I just never pick things up in the original game? Did I just not know anything better back then? I don’t know the answer to those questions, but the reality is that in 2021 it’s kind of brutal and not in a good way. Your choices are basically to be extremely selective on what you decide to stop and pick up and then possibly miss out on upgrades, or just spend most of your gameplay time in your inventory. While I’m fortunate that the version of Diablo 2 that contained respeccing made it into Diablo 2: Resurrected, I would have really preferred to just have unlimited respeccing as you do in Diablo 3. As it stands, it’s a pain in the ass to experiment and you’ll need to really commit to your play style and resort to starting a new character if you want to have easy access to something different. Finally, let me just also add, that the lack of a local couch co-op option for console players is a total bummer. I have to imagine, considering Diablo 3 had the option, that it probably wasn’t a philosophical choice, but rather it probably just wasn’t possible. Still, that doesn’t make it any less of a disappointment. I know that hardcore Diablo 2 fans don’t want to even entertain the idea of Diablo 3 seeping into their beloved game; I totally get that sentiment and don’t want a watered-down version of Diablo 2 either. However, a few modern touches, addressing the three biggest pain points I mentioned above would have gone a long way to properly resurrecting Diablo 2 and making it a premier ARPG in 2021. It doesn’t reach that potential, sadly, but it’s still an all-time great game that mostly holds up as long as you can look past its dated features.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Coming off the first game, the hope was that the sequel would expand upon the hardcore stealth mechanics, and it would have worked a treat with Aragami 2’s larger levels. The increase in co-op partners make for more ways to have fun, and being able to see how certain groups tackle things silently or with all-out mayhem could have given the community more to strive for. The new direction in Aragami 2 is not a bad thing at all, considering the general quality present, but perhaps giving players the option between this new style and the old would have made this sequel a more complete package worth killing for.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Death Stranding Director's Cut continues to impress with its fearless commitment to fetch quests on top of fetch quests, and again, it's not going to change your mind if you didn't already buy into what it was selling back in 2019. But if you did, the Director's Cut enhances and enriches that original experience, and you'll be happy you jumped back into this one.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Its messages certainly resonated with me but its gameplay lacked the variety to truly keep me hooked for lengthier sessions. If you're looking for a chill experience and can overlook any performance issues that aren't quite resolved by the time you pick it up, then Sable will deliver. I just can't help shake the feeling of missed potential here.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Lost Judgement takes everything that was great about the original and makes it that much better. It's got a magnificent story, great characters, an enormous amount of side characters, and great combat all in one package. It's just one of those games that you won't want to put down for bed while also being the reason you get up early for work in order to play just a little bit more. Lost Judgment is simply a perfect sequel.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Before I knew it, my initial skepticism and complaints had begun to evaporate. Even as a silent protagonist, John manages to exude so much personality from his non-committal shrugs and sighs, and he and Sam play off each other so well it’s hard not to feel endeared to them. Everything about Eastward just feels immediately magical and nostalgic, and while my gripes with the combat and stretched out dungeon designs never really went away entirely, Sam’s journey is still one I’m glad I went on in the end.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Deathloop is still signature Arkane in terms of exemplary immersive-sim design, reminiscent of BioShock and Dishonored, but it also puts a giant smile on your face each and every time you play.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This feels like a safe yet enjoyable follow-up to Berseria. Longtime fans will be satisfied with this entry after the five-year wait since the last mainline game even though Tales of Arise doesn’t feel like it strays too far away from the standard series formula.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Life Is Strange: True Colors is right up there as one of the best games in the series, if not the outright best. Its characters are interestingly complex and believable, the writing is strong — albeit a bit clichéd in true Life Is Strange fashion — and its more sinister narrative has plenty of twists and turns that’ll keep you hooked. It’s all punctuated by heartwarming, lighthearted sections reminiscent of Before the Storm’s beloved ‘play’ scene, and its decisions will have you second-guessing yourself for hours. The whole experience is wrapped up in the strongest presentation values and a soundtrack that never skips a beat. This is a must-play for fans of the series, and a serious contender for my Game of the Year.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    I did hope for a little bit more from this Switch title; WarioWare: Gold for the 3DS seemed to have better value with 100 more microgames, full voice acting, and a lower price tag. The Switch game just feels like it's missing something. However, WarioWare: Get It Together! is simply fun. It's an entertaining game to play in short bursts when you have some downtime or when you're in the mood for something a little zanier.

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