Worth Playing's Scores

  • Games
For 5,407 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 62% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 32% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 73
Highest review score: 99 Fight Night Round 2
Lowest review score: 10 Navy SEALs: Weapons of Mass Destruction
Score distribution:
5408 game reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    It's a fun derby racer game that lives up to its FlatOut roots and more. It has a somewhat bare-bones presentation that is rife with bugs and long loading screens, but when it works, it's a remarkable experience from start to finish. If you love this kind of racer, the console version of Wreckfest will hold up its end of the deal and deliver frantic mayhem racing at its best.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    For newcomers, The Walking Dead: The Telltale Definitive Series is an easy purchase, since you're getting every game in the series at an excellent discount. If you've experienced the game before, the proposition of going back is dependent on whether you want to experience the game again with better graphics and fewer bugs. If you're a super fan, the abundance of extras will be tempting enough to warrant the double-dip. No matter your stance, the collection still holds up, and this is a lasting example of what made Telltale stand out in the first place.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 69 Critic Score
    As a whole, NHL 20 is still NHL like it always was. There are incremental changes, but there's still a lot more to be done. Be a Pro remains completely untouched, and the minor additions to other offline single-player modes are sobering. The presentation and animation take a small leap, and HUT seems slightly less grindy with the addition of Squad Battles and a more transparent model to receive card packs without being forced to spend real money. The new eliminator modes in CHEL are equally fun, but at the end of the day, this year doesn't feel as significant as the last. I'm curious where the franchise goes next year with the prospect of several new consoles on the horizon, but it has to step up things more than it currently does.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    At the end of the day, Damascus Gear: Operation Osaka never extends beyond the realm of a fun time-waster. It's not bad if you're looking for a cheap, mech-focused, loot-heavy dungeon-crawler. If you love giant robots, then Operation Osaka is a fun way to spend $20. Beyond that, it's just another dungeon-crawler on a system that is awash with them.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    Aside from the basic gameplay and a few rough edges, A Plague Tale: Innocence tells an incredibly gripping story about a couple of kids in the most grim circumstances imaginable. It nails the horrifying setting with standout visuals and a thick atmosphere that is worth experiencing at least once. If you're looking for the next great story to play through, A Plague Tale is definitely it.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Stellaris: Console Edition is a mighty impressive game in and of itself. It also did the impossible: make a fairly complex and grand strategy title enjoyable on a console. That should stand as its own achievement. If you have access to Stellaris on a powerful PC, the console edition isn't for you. Even though it is a great title, the console version still feels somewhat restrained and pared down, but that may change with future updates. Regardless, if you're a fan of the genre and only game on a console at home, this is as close as you can get to a great strategy title running in its full glory on a TV.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    All in all, Astral Chain is a solid and enjoyable action-RPG. It suffers from a lot of Platinum Games' most common problems, such as poor instructions for basic gameplay and an over-reliance on minigames, but the charm and enjoyment of the core game more than make up for that once you get past the rough opening. It's not quite up the highs of a Bayonetta or Nier Automata, but it's worth playing for fans of the company or those looking for a fun action-RPG on the Switch.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Hellmut: The Badass from Hell is a few steps short of being an all-around must-have roguelike shooter. The camera is zoomed in enough and just jerky enough that some enemies can be easily hidden from view. There's also the character unlocking process, which is only valuable if you plan on taking multiple successful runs through the game. With that said, the action is excellent, and the flaws aren't enough to stop the title from having that sort of magic that beckons you for one more run. Despite not being the first choice for a roguelike shooter, Hellmut is ultimately a good choice.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    I can't remember the last time I was willfully ready to risk getting a headache to play a game because I enjoyed the world and challenges so much. I've played through the main story twice, and I am still picking away at the side missions and running around the Oldest House to see if there's anything else worth finding. Staccato mass-combat issues and other burps aside, I'd recommend Control to anyone. Its world may be frightening and confusing, but it's also truly a sight to behold.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    All in all, Final Fantasy VIII: Remastered is a solid port. The new character models look nice, and the additional features are all welcome. At its core, it's still Final Fantasy 8, and almost nothing has changed about it. If you were a fan of the original, you'll like the remaster, and if you weren't, then it's unlikely this will change your mind. This is likely the definitive version of the game, blurry backgrounds and all, and it's well worth picking up for anyone who's looking to experience FF8 for the first time.
    • 85 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Although it has a few stumbles, and an obvious setup for Gears 6, the overall campaign package is a satisfying experience whether you’re a long time Gears fan or entirely new to the series. It’s great to see The Coalition trying new things here, though on balance, the team still played it pretty safe. The campaign in Gears 5 is more of a minor iteration than a major evolution in gameplay. Maybe Gears 6 will push the envelope a bit more.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Children of Morta is charming, engaging and fun. It's absolutely worth playing if you're a fan of the genre, and the Bergsons are one of the best family units in gaming. The world and characters draw you in, and the simple but engaging roguelike gameplay keeps you there. It doesn't break any molds, but it doesn't try to. Instead, the title focuses on offering what it has with a mirror polish. It has some problems and can feel repetitive at times, but any sense of weariness is lost the next time a beautiful cut scene begins.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Ape Out is the kind of game that makes you glad the indie scene exists. It defines the type of game that is very easy to pick up, but it takes some real practice to conquer. It places pure action over story, with the reward for surviving every encounter being pure satisfaction. Failure is met with an immediate desire to try again instead of groaning in frustration. It's a gorgeous game, but more importantly, it ends way before the premise wears thin. In short, Ape Out easily goes on the list for one of the best titles of the year.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If Gears POP! had focused on skill rather than pay-to-win game design, it could have been an impressive title. Even it its current state, the game does shine in those moments when you happen to get a fair matchup. Distilled down into its purest form, though, Gears POP! is nothing more than an exploitative loot box machine that relies on the goodwill granted by the Gears and Funko brands to separate gamers from their cash. Here's hoping that Gears 5 doesn't go down the same route.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Gunlord X shows everyone else what the hardcore fans already knew: the NG:DEV.TEAM is fully capable of delivering an authentic, white-knuckle, retro-shooting experience. The action is constant but not overwhelming, and your arsenal feels varied, with none of the weapons ever feeling useless. The boss fights are fun, while the level design mixes in a good deal of exploration. Really, the only complaint is that there's nothing to bring you back once you finally beat the game, but considering how enjoyable the journey is, that isn't a big deal. Shooting fans are going to have a really good time with Gunlord X.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 73 Critic Score
    Rad
    Looking at RAD as a whole, it's a solid roguelike that shines in creative ideas, setting, and visuals. At the same time, it falls for the usual tropes, so if you're not a fan of roguelikes, you have been warned. Difficulty and repetition are exaggerated here, but it's due to repetition in powers and level design, which makes grinding for progression even more tedious than it has to be. For a $20 purchase, this is certainly a good new roguelike for fans of Double Fine and the genre.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Catherine Classic may have lost some of its freshness over time, but it remains an intriguing title for those looking for a game that defies expectations. Its more adult style may seem too simple for some, but it's something that very few visual novels attempt to do. The puzzle aspect remains hellish in difficulty but is still fun once you learn all of the tricks and can deal with the imposed time limits. For longtime fans, there isn't much here to bring you back, but unless you don't have your PS3 anymore or an Xbox One to play the Xbox 360 version, Catherine Classic is worth checking out.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Man of Medan is a worthy follow-up to Until Dawn. It hits a lot of the same notes, and it's clear the developers understood the group appeal of watching-slash-playing a cheesy horror film with friends. There are still some weak points, but Man of Medan shows a willingness to learn from the previous game's mistakes and leaves us curious to see the next part of the anthology.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The game has unique mechanics that are genuinely fun to put into action, but it's still a generic monetary title. Developer PlayFusion plans to continue updating the game by adding new content. Champions has more longevity to it than other CCGs out there. It's an entertaining title for a time-sink for when you're waiting at the doctor's office, but it falls short of being a good console game.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ancestors: The Humankind Odyssey is far from being a title that the mainstream crowd could easily pick up and play. Technical aspects, like the wonky camera and uninviting controls, can be overcome with time, but the camera system and lack of any direction are enough to turn off most people. Stick with it through multiple restarts, however, and you'll discover a title that has loads of fulfilling moments and deep characters you'll get attached to, despite a lack of understandable speech. Games have rarely done something like this, and that fact is amplified when you look at the scope this is trying to cover. If you're looking for a survival title that feels different and distinct, give Ancestors a look.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Control is a fun follow-up to the sort of weird surreality from Alan Wake without being a direct story sequel. It has distinctive visuals, a dark sense of humor, lots of fourth-wall breaking, and enjoyable combat. If you're looking for a shooter with its own sense of style and a solid amount of content, look no further than Control. Just don't start getting paranoid about why your controller wasn't where you last saw it....
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Like its predecessor, Earth Defense Force 5 is a fine jumping-off point for newcomers to the series. The shooting remains as solid as ever, and the concept of mixing in loot drops with blasting large enemy hordes remains enjoyable, even if the whole package isn't as polished as expected from something with a cult following. However, EDF5 doesn't surpass the heights of EDF4.1 due to its flaws detracting from the progress of its improvements. The deeper combat thanks to some new enemy types only comes after spending the first two levels doing nothing, and the game is now more stable, but PC fans who've waited this long still have to buy the extra missions via DLC. Nevertheless, this is a treat of a game that actions fans will love.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    My Memory of Us feels like a game that is fighting with itself. On the one hand, the story is wonderful. Even though some players may not like the attempts to dull the harshness of the real stories, it remains a hopeful tale where the horrors can still be understood by those willing to look beyond the surface level. On the other hand, the frustration felt by the sometimes-unresponsive controls can obscure the message, as the controls can make even the simplest of things feel more frustrating. This is still a title worth checking out, but only if you're patient enough to withstand a control scheme that is at odds with the challenges in place.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 59 Critic Score
    Oninaki certainly has plenty of ambition, promise and talent, but unfortunately, it didn't substantially deliver on any of them. There are many layered game mechanics and an intriguing story that don't stand a chance against extremely easy and repetitive gameplay. It's quite obvious that the development time and budget were limited, which results in an experience that is mediocre at best, regardless of how great this could have been. The almost-AAA price of $50 makes it a hard sell that should only be considered by determined fans or those who have played and enjoyed the demo.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A solid attempt at changing up the Soulsborne formula. It doesn't quite hit the same marks that make From Software's franchise so delightful, but it has its own strengths. Co-op is a lot of fun, and having a game genuinely built around it is a welcome change from phantoms and the ilk. Remnant is at its strongest when you're playing with other people and working together to take on huge Root monsters or figure out the answer to a riddle. If you're looking for a co-op based Souls game, then Remnant is worth a look.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Switch is already home to a variety of shooters, but Pawarumi makes a solid case for being a worthy addition to a shooter fan's library. The gimmick of having three different-colored guns and enemies makes the game more cerebral while also not punishing players who just want to stick with one weapon type. The three main game difficulties make it accessible to everyone, while the difficulty levels determining the number and order of the stages mean that playthroughs may feel familiar but not exactly the same. It could have used a few more modes to round out the package, but thanks to it doing just about everything right, Pawarumi is worth playing for shooting fans.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    The name of the game is simplicity. Nelke and the Legendary Alchemists: Ateliers of the New World offers an experience that takes aspects of many genres and boils them down to the basics, for better and for worse. This mix of mindlessness and analysis creates an entrancing paradox that's fun to experiment with. While the game has little in terms of innovation or challenge, it offers itself as an escape into a weird world that you can invest in as much as you want, allowing a haven of your own design that grants success with some effort, patience and time. It'll suck you right in if you can stomach the syrupy sweetness and hollow banter.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    With its many surprises, Darkwood is a title with immeasurable depth that will keep horror fans gripped until the very end. An important focus on narrative-driven gameplay kept me hooked and desperate for answers. A horrifying aesthetic with spooky soundscapes plays with our instincts and terrifies the senses. When the title boasted "a horror game without jump-scares", I initially rolled my eyes. Most titles incorporate some kind of jump-scare to get a cheap reaction out of players. Even tastefully done jump-scares feel cheap to me because I'm not actually "scared," I'm just surprised. Darkwood succeeds where many other titles fail. It's a heart-racing experience that any horror fan worth their salt should attempt to survive.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    When compared to the other entries in the series, Earth Defense Force: Iron Rain is a major low point. The various changes that improve on the formula are outweighed by other design choices that actively hurt the title's overall appeal. The actual combat still has some of the magic the series is known for, and even if online co-op is barely there unless you coordinate with others beforehand, the game is still fun to play with friends. If you're new to the series, playing Iron Rain won't be so bad, but if you've already killed bugs several times before, this title won't be able to scratch that itch again.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Crash Team Racing Nitro-Fueled on the Switch is my favorite kart racer, even managing to outshine Mario Kart. The focus on tight and challenging gameplay that requires skill over luck was a nice change of pace. Add to that the great presentation and amount of content, and there's not much else that you could wish for. At this point, the only real complaints are the long loading screens, the microtransactions that Activision is rolling out, and the sometimes-broken multiplayer component. It's enough to make it anything but a perfect game, but it's a good title, especially for the $40 price tag.

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