Worth Playing's Scores

  • Games
For 5,427 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 62% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 32% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1 point lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 73
Highest review score: 99 Pac-Man Championship Edition DX
Lowest review score: 10 Navy SEALs: Weapons of Mass Destruction
Score distribution:
5427 game reviews
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    As a fan of the movies and a fan of creative approaches to games, I've had my eye on John Wick Hex since the day it was announced. Its bizarre approach works satisfyingly well in the context of how John Wick would think in the same situations: risk versus reward, careful observation and planning, plays and counter-plays. It is a simple game to understand yet rewarding to attempt to master. It also makes a compelling case of how great movie-inspired games can be if developers really think outside of the box.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Concrete Genie is far less than the sum of its parts. A strong early game is lost by a bizarre late-game twist that undoes a lot of the charm. If it had just focused on the genies or had been about combat from the start, Concrete Genie would be a much more cohesive experience. Instead, the game has a lot of good moments but ends on a particularly dissatisfying note. There's still a lot to enjoy, but the flaws stand out as brightly as the strengths.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    As a multiplayer experience, Gears 5 offers up a wide variety of options, and something is sure to please almost every type of player. There are some rough edges, especially with the way character upgrades are handled, but the core gameplay is solid and satisfying. Combined with the campaign, Microsoft and the Coalition have given players an amazing value, especially if you are getting the title via Game Pass. It may not be perfect, but it'll provide hours of fun, and that's what matters.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Indivisible was incredibly close to being the best indie RPG I've ever played. The first half of the game is exciting, engaging and does a fantastic job of meshing together fighting games, Metroidvanias, platformers and RPGs. Unfortunately, the second half only manages to nail the Metroidvania and platformer aspects. The strong presentation and likeable characters help carry it through the weaker second half, and it's still absolutely worth a shot if you're looking for a stylish RPG. Maybe some patches and rebalancing can help the weaker second half, but for the moment, Indivisible starts off strong and finishes weak.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Overall, Ace Attorney Trilogy wholeheartedly proves its worth as a remaster. The story still stands up today and balances goofiness and sincerity in a fun and enchanting way. The gameplay is slow but wins over its audience. The graphics are heavily improved from its myriad predecessors, and the music is brought to life in just the right way. Sure, there are some slight slip-ups here and there, but this game is a gem that's worth playing from the pantheon of games, especially those in the visual novel genre. At this time, the defense rests.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Hyperspace Delivery Service is a charming, retro-inspired experience. Pixel graphics and chill synth tunes create a solid package for a game that wants to bring back a familiar experience. If you're looking for a high-energy space adventure, this may not be for you. The game isn't trying to be that, either. Instead, it seeks to expand on the genre of item management and economy gameplay with a dash of active gameplay.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The end result is a game that is phenomenal in its presentation and very decent in gameplay. Ori and the Blind Forest: Definitive Edition doesn't necessarily set a new standard or innovate within the Metroidvania genre, but it does create an experience that is elevated by its otherwise stellar production values. Ultimately, it's up to personal preference, but you should give the game a chance; you'd likely regret it otherwise.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Puzzle Quest: The Legend Returns might be a relic of a bygone time, but that isn't the same as being a bad game. Most of the modern match-three games owe something to the original, and it shows. It might not have Marvel characters or shiny graphics, but it's an accessible, enjoyable and fun puzzle game that is excellent to play for a few minutes at a time. For $15, you'll get more fun than you would in spending that same amount on microtransactions in other games.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Ni No Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch Remastered on the Switch is a great port of a very good JRPG. Its stellar presentation and unique mix of known JRPG systems make it an engrossing experience that every fan of the genre should experience at least once. It isn't perfect, with some frustrations around its combat system and AI, but that doesn't detract from everything else it does as well or better than many other JRPGs in recent memory. If you have a Switch and are intrigued by Ni No Kuni, you cannot go wrong with this game.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening is a delightful remake of an excellent game. A lot of its strength is predicated on the fact that it was built on an already exceptional Zelda game, and if you have any nostalgia for the Game Boy version, you'll be charmed by this update. The game's only real flaws are its overall short length and the frustrating frame rate issues. If you're a Zelda fan, it's still absolutely worth checking out, and if the frame rate issues get patched, this title will be the best way to play the handheld classic.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Borderlands 3 is a solid game for fans. It relishes in the multiplayer moment-to-moment combat, and the multitude of guns and the post-campaign game give players enough reasons to keep playing long after the credits have rolled. It won't convert those who disliked the series into fans, but it also does everything it can to keep itself true to what players liked about the originals. For those who are still deciding whether to jump in, Borderlands 3 is a good place to do so.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    All in all, Daemon x Machina is about the best that one can hope for from an Armored Core fill-in. It isn't quite as good as the highs of the tragically sleeping franchise, but it's on par with the average. If you like mecha, customization, and blowing up stuff, and you have a tolerance for the learning curve of the controls, then Daemon x Machina will keep you happy. At the end of the day, you get to pilot a giant robot and slash up enemies with a giant lightsaber, and who doesn't love that?
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    For most, the mileage you'll get out of Trover Saves the Universe will depend on how much you love "Rick and Morty" and how receptive you are to Roiland's improv-heavy brand of humor. Those who swear — perhaps literally — by the Adult Swim cartoon will assuredly have a good time; those seeking a slightly more involved VR experience may be better off looking elsewhere.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    It's a fun derby racer game that lives up to its FlatOut roots and more. It has a somewhat bare-bones presentation that is rife with bugs and long loading screens, but when it works, it's a remarkable experience from start to finish. If you love this kind of racer, the console version of Wreckfest will hold up its end of the deal and deliver frantic mayhem racing at its best.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    For newcomers, The Walking Dead: The Telltale Definitive Series is an easy purchase, since you're getting every game in the series at an excellent discount. If you've experienced the game before, the proposition of going back is dependent on whether you want to experience the game again with better graphics and fewer bugs. If you're a super fan, the abundance of extras will be tempting enough to warrant the double-dip. No matter your stance, the collection still holds up, and this is a lasting example of what made Telltale stand out in the first place.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    Aside from the basic gameplay and a few rough edges, A Plague Tale: Innocence tells an incredibly gripping story about a couple of kids in the most grim circumstances imaginable. It nails the horrifying setting with standout visuals and a thick atmosphere that is worth experiencing at least once. If you're looking for the next great story to play through, A Plague Tale is definitely it.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Stellaris: Console Edition is a mighty impressive game in and of itself. It also did the impossible: make a fairly complex and grand strategy title enjoyable on a console. That should stand as its own achievement. If you have access to Stellaris on a powerful PC, the console edition isn't for you. Even though it is a great title, the console version still feels somewhat restrained and pared down, but that may change with future updates. Regardless, if you're a fan of the genre and only game on a console at home, this is as close as you can get to a great strategy title running in its full glory on a TV.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    All in all, Astral Chain is a solid and enjoyable action-RPG. It suffers from a lot of Platinum Games' most common problems, such as poor instructions for basic gameplay and an over-reliance on minigames, but the charm and enjoyment of the core game more than make up for that once you get past the rough opening. It's not quite up the highs of a Bayonetta or Nier Automata, but it's worth playing for fans of the company or those looking for a fun action-RPG on the Switch.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Hellmut: The Badass from Hell is a few steps short of being an all-around must-have roguelike shooter. The camera is zoomed in enough and just jerky enough that some enemies can be easily hidden from view. There's also the character unlocking process, which is only valuable if you plan on taking multiple successful runs through the game. With that said, the action is excellent, and the flaws aren't enough to stop the title from having that sort of magic that beckons you for one more run. Despite not being the first choice for a roguelike shooter, Hellmut is ultimately a good choice.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    I can't remember the last time I was willfully ready to risk getting a headache to play a game because I enjoyed the world and challenges so much. I've played through the main story twice, and I am still picking away at the side missions and running around the Oldest House to see if there's anything else worth finding. Staccato mass-combat issues and other burps aside, I'd recommend Control to anyone. Its world may be frightening and confusing, but it's also truly a sight to behold.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    All in all, Final Fantasy VIII: Remastered is a solid port. The new character models look nice, and the additional features are all welcome. At its core, it's still Final Fantasy 8, and almost nothing has changed about it. If you were a fan of the original, you'll like the remaster, and if you weren't, then it's unlikely this will change your mind. This is likely the definitive version of the game, blurry backgrounds and all, and it's well worth picking up for anyone who's looking to experience FF8 for the first time.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Children of Morta is charming, engaging and fun. It's absolutely worth playing if you're a fan of the genre, and the Bergsons are one of the best family units in gaming. The world and characters draw you in, and the simple but engaging roguelike gameplay keeps you there. It doesn't break any molds, but it doesn't try to. Instead, the title focuses on offering what it has with a mirror polish. It has some problems and can feel repetitive at times, but any sense of weariness is lost the next time a beautiful cut scene begins.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Ape Out is the kind of game that makes you glad the indie scene exists. It defines the type of game that is very easy to pick up, but it takes some real practice to conquer. It places pure action over story, with the reward for surviving every encounter being pure satisfaction. Failure is met with an immediate desire to try again instead of groaning in frustration. It's a gorgeous game, but more importantly, it ends way before the premise wears thin. In short, Ape Out easily goes on the list for one of the best titles of the year.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If Gears POP! had focused on skill rather than pay-to-win game design, it could have been an impressive title. Even it its current state, the game does shine in those moments when you happen to get a fair matchup. Distilled down into its purest form, though, Gears POP! is nothing more than an exploitative loot box machine that relies on the goodwill granted by the Gears and Funko brands to separate gamers from their cash. Here's hoping that Gears 5 doesn't go down the same route.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Gunlord X shows everyone else what the hardcore fans already knew: the NG:DEV.TEAM is fully capable of delivering an authentic, white-knuckle, retro-shooting experience. The action is constant but not overwhelming, and your arsenal feels varied, with none of the weapons ever feeling useless. The boss fights are fun, while the level design mixes in a good deal of exploration. Really, the only complaint is that there's nothing to bring you back once you finally beat the game, but considering how enjoyable the journey is, that isn't a big deal. Shooting fans are going to have a really good time with Gunlord X.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Catherine Classic may have lost some of its freshness over time, but it remains an intriguing title for those looking for a game that defies expectations. Its more adult style may seem too simple for some, but it's something that very few visual novels attempt to do. The puzzle aspect remains hellish in difficulty but is still fun once you learn all of the tricks and can deal with the imposed time limits. For longtime fans, there isn't much here to bring you back, but unless you don't have your PS3 anymore or an Xbox One to play the Xbox 360 version, Catherine Classic is worth checking out.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Man of Medan is a worthy follow-up to Until Dawn. It hits a lot of the same notes, and it's clear the developers understood the group appeal of watching-slash-playing a cheesy horror film with friends. There are still some weak points, but Man of Medan shows a willingness to learn from the previous game's mistakes and leaves us curious to see the next part of the anthology.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ancestors: The Humankind Odyssey is far from being a title that the mainstream crowd could easily pick up and play. Technical aspects, like the wonky camera and uninviting controls, can be overcome with time, but the camera system and lack of any direction are enough to turn off most people. Stick with it through multiple restarts, however, and you'll discover a title that has loads of fulfilling moments and deep characters you'll get attached to, despite a lack of understandable speech. Games have rarely done something like this, and that fact is amplified when you look at the scope this is trying to cover. If you're looking for a survival title that feels different and distinct, give Ancestors a look.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Control is a fun follow-up to the sort of weird surreality from Alan Wake without being a direct story sequel. It has distinctive visuals, a dark sense of humor, lots of fourth-wall breaking, and enjoyable combat. If you're looking for a shooter with its own sense of style and a solid amount of content, look no further than Control. Just don't start getting paranoid about why your controller wasn't where you last saw it....
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Like its predecessor, Earth Defense Force 5 is a fine jumping-off point for newcomers to the series. The shooting remains as solid as ever, and the concept of mixing in loot drops with blasting large enemy hordes remains enjoyable, even if the whole package isn't as polished as expected from something with a cult following. However, EDF5 doesn't surpass the heights of EDF4.1 due to its flaws detracting from the progress of its improvements. The deeper combat thanks to some new enemy types only comes after spending the first two levels doing nothing, and the game is now more stable, but PC fans who've waited this long still have to buy the extra missions via DLC. Nevertheless, this is a treat of a game that actions fans will love.

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