Xbox Achievements' Scores

  • Games
For 931 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 56% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 39% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 74
Highest review score: 100 Fallout 3: Broken Steel
Lowest review score: 20 Destroy All Humans! Path of the Furon
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 52 out of 931
931 game reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    And while Late Shift is well shot and proficiently put together, it's worth noting that the game is essentially just making decisions as the action unfolds before you. There's nothing more to it than that, but as far as delivering an interactive movie goes, this is probably about as good as it gets. I've yet to play an example of an FMV game that's as well made as Late Shift, not that I've played many FMV games, mind you. Still, as a compelling interactive, cinematic experience, it might be flawed, but all in all, Late Shift delivers the goods. It just might not bowl you over completely.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Successfully making the leap from the Wii U four years since its original release, LEGO City Undercover is still a fantastically fun and exciting open-world adventure.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Blackwood Crossing might be short but sweet, yet it's clearly an experience that's been made as a labour of love, and as such, it has a magical, almost ethereal quality that's impossible to forget.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Not played Bulletstorm before? Then the Full Clip Edition is pretty much essential. Played it and finished it? In that case, Bulletstorm: Full Clip Edition is worth revisiting for a second time, although the smattering of added extras might not necessarily be reason enough. Still, Bulletstorm is still good, dirty fun that will punch you square in the crotch.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 55 Critic Score
    Yooka-Laylee is not a bad game, but by God does it have its problems. If you’re hankering for a 3D platformer in the vein of Banjo-Kazooie, Spyro, Mario or Crash, I’d still say this is worth a bit of your time if you’re willing to chew on the game in short sections. But if you want to marathon the game, or don’t mind waiting until later in the year to have your genre itch scratched, you’re probably better off passing on this.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    You might initially turn your nose up at Mass Effect: Andromeda, but stick with it and you'll be richly rewarded with a vast space opera that gets better and better. It has problems, but they pale into insignificance once you're swept up in the exploits of Mass Effect: Andromeda's Pathfinder.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Stupidly enjoyable and endlessly charming, LEGO Worlds is the gift that keeps on giving with different biomes – jungles, spooky forests, deserts, swamps, candy lands with gingerbread men and more - an adventure filled with quests and infinite scope to make whatever you want. LEGO Worlds is fantastic.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A solid but glitch-riddled open-world tactical shooter that falls agonisingly short of realising its full potential, Ghost Recon Wildlands is the very definition of a 'nearly' game. It's so very nearly brilliant, but there are a few too many problems with it that mar the overall experience. Shame.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    For Honor can take some time to gel, but once you understand the ebb and flow of its combat, mastering its various subtleties, you'll discover a uniquely gratifying, exciting and often brilliantly brutal game of swords, axes, shields and spears. For Honor is almost like playing Game of Thrones' 'Battle of the Bastards' sequence; and if that sounds like a hearty recommendation, that's because it is. Ubisoft Montreal's game certainly has its flaws, but they pale into insignificance against the myriad things it manages to get right. All in all, For Honor is a triumph.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The mechanics aren’t dumbed down - rather, they’re streamlined into something understandable and accessible without losing the depth that makes RTS games so damn satisfying to play.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    A bigger and better game than its forebear, Sniper Elite 4 is ludicrously good fun, proving beyond doubt that there's infinite appeal in blasting Nazis' bits off. Scope it out.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    An unusual game, Knee Deep is entertaining while it lasts, its offbeat, Twin Peaks-inspired murder mystery taking in some strange twists and turns to reach its unexpected conclusion. Cypress Knee is certainly a place worth visiting.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    As a die-hard Resident Evil fan since the first game arrived in 1996, Resident Evil 7 hits all of the right notes while feeling like a natural evolution for the series. Building upon what makes Capcom's survival horror so special, while effectively telling an entirely new story, Resident Evil 7 is a fantastic game that ought to please those looking for scares and fervent Resident Evil faithful alike.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    I'll admit that my interest in Telltale's well-worn adventure formula was starting to wane, but The Walking Dead: A New Frontier's opening episodes are proof positive that there's still plenty of life in it, as Ties That Bind Part 1 and 2 are both barnstorming episodes. Essential for any self-respecting The Walking Dead fan, regardless of whether you played seasons one and two in Telltale's series.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    I'll admit that my interest in Telltale's well-worn adventure formula was starting to wane, but The Walking Dead: A New Frontier's opening episodes are proof positive that there's still plenty of life in it, as Ties That Bind Part 1 and 2 are both barnstorming episodes. Essential for any self-respecting The Walking Dead fan, regardless of whether you played seasons one and two in Telltale's series.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A clear labour of love, The Little Acre is an endearing and enjoyable adventure game whose main crime is being an all too brief experience that fails to provide a satisfying ending. Overlook these quibbles, however, and you'll find it hard not to relish your stay in The Little Acre's magical world.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Who'd have thought that a game ostensibly about Brexit could not only be so funny, but also provide a selection of clever puzzles to boot? Her Majesty's SPIFFING is all of these things and therefore an adventure game you should most certainly play, if only for a little bit of levity with which to see out 2016.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Dead Rising 4 is undoubtedly a great zombie game, with Capcom Vancouver nailing the open-world and tone once more, but the lack of true psychos in the world does detract from the overall experience. It’s no Dead Rising 3, but it’s still a bloody good game.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    Steep is an admirable effort from Ubisoft Annecy, one that is chock full of decent ideas, but held back by others. This simulation extreme sports title lays down the foundations for what could turn out to be another staple in Ubisoft’s ever growing catalogue.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    As an RPG, Final Fantasy XV has everything you’d expect: a compelling, emotional story; a tapestry of complimentary mechanics; a significant lifespan; a cast of relatable and well-written characters and a world that’s dense enough to be a character in and of itself. As a Final Fantasy game, it lives up to all the tropes, despite the variations it’s taken from the more ‘classic’ games. Final Fantasy XV is a title that's aimed super high, and although maybe it hasn’t quite hit the targets it set for itself, it certainly doesn’t disappoint, and is a strong enough RPG experience to stand aside The Witcher as one of the best open-world role-playing games of this generation.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Watch Dogs 2 is a game that wants to take you on a whistlestop tour of San Francisco’s not-so-hidden underbelly. For a game with a central cast of disenfranchised youths, I found it oddly relatable and compelling. Every bone in my body ached for me to hate DedSec, but instead I totally fell in with them and everything they were about. Marcus Holloway is to Watch Dogs what Ezio Auditore was to Assassin’s Creed: the symbol of a new era, the mascot of a franchise that has proved it shouldn’t be judged on first impressions, that has proved it can move with the times. It’s a strong, smart game that never takes itself too seriously, and the result is pretty special.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Infinity Ward's seminal Call of Duty gets the revamp it deserves; Call of Duty: Modern Warfare Remastered gives the 2007 shooter a new lease of life, enabling newcomers to see what all the fuss was about and veterans the chance to relive a classic. The best Call of Duty game just got even better.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Dishonored was a genuine surprise when it launched four years ago; an innovative first-person experience that confounded expectations. That Dishonored 2 manages to once again surprise and amaze as much as the first game did is testament to what Arkane has crafted here. Dishonored 2 is quite simply one of the greatest games this year, and quite possibly one of the best of this generation.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    Hitman is arguably a pinnacle for the series, possibly even eclipsing Blood Money as Agent 47's finest moment. Each episode is a sandbox that you don't simply play and then forget. You'll want to master it and discover all of its hidden secrets and nuances. And therein lies Hitman's innate brilliance. It's deep, expansive and open-ended enough that you'll never want to stop playing. Hitman is quite simply magnificent.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    We'll be damned if Infinity Ward hasn't gone and pulled it out of the bag this year. Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare is yet another delectable dollop of shooty blockbuster entertainment that somehow manages to exceed expectations. Yes, it hasn't really come all that far and no, Infinity Ward hasn't reinvented the wheel. But as Call of Duty experiences go, Infinite Warfare hits the mark.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    An exemplary slice of fan service once again, Dragon Ball Xenoverse 2 also succeeds in being a rewarding game that even non-DBZ fans will find enjoyable. Obviously, fans will lap up every last bit, even if the combat does persist in being a bit of a button-mashing exercise. That aside, DBX 2 is a marked improvement over its predecessor.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Titanfall’s now-classic speed works so well in this game - Respawn has studied everything that made the original game so enjoyable in multiplayer and built a solid story experience around those elements. The multiplayer is evolving, and whilst some may argue it's getting top-heavy, we truly believe that every alteration Respawn has made to the core Titanfall experience has been for the better, resulting in a stronger, better and more robust sequel.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    WWE 2K17 is a marginally better game than 2K16, as the core mechanics feel like they've been refined a bit, but with the fantastic 2K Showcase consigned to the bin and no new modes to replace it, this is a package that's now sorely lacking. You might as well play last year's game, unless you're a massive fan that has to have the most up to date roster possible. Otherwise, WWE 2K17 is an enjoyable wrestling game that could still do with a bit of a kick up the backside for next year's instalment.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    DICE should be praised for taking the risky move and turning back the clock with Battlefield 1, both in terms of the era and the direction for the franchise. Very often these moves can cripple a series, but thankfully for us – and DICE – it’s a move that has revitalised the franchise.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 55 Critic Score
    Turning its back on the options that made WRC 5 accessible to casual players and hardened rally fans alike means WRC 6 simply won't appeal to many people. It's a title resolutely aimed at the hardcore racer, with a stupid penalty system, twitchy handling and as steep a difficulty curve as you can get in a racing game. It's especially galling, as you can see some clear improvements here. I've played plenty of sim racers in the past and enjoyed myself, but playing WRC 6 feels like a thankless chore. Die-hard rallysport fans/masochists need only apply.

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