• Network: Netflix
  • Series Premiere Date: Aug 22, 2014
Season #: 6.5, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1
User Score
8.9

Universal acclaim- based on 451 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Negative: 21 out of 451

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User Reviews

  1. Aug 18, 2015
    6
    The second season, much like the first, offers up a unique blend of absurdist comedy and self-pitying drama with funny and poignant moments sprinkled along the way. Most of its focus is drawn to what is essentially what is the counterpoint of the HBO show Entourage. While Entourage was all Hollywood glitz and glamour Bojack is all Hollywood moroseness and hollowness. Much like Entourage,The second season, much like the first, offers up a unique blend of absurdist comedy and self-pitying drama with funny and poignant moments sprinkled along the way. Most of its focus is drawn to what is essentially what is the counterpoint of the HBO show Entourage. While Entourage was all Hollywood glitz and glamour Bojack is all Hollywood moroseness and hollowness. Much like Entourage, Bojack is in truth an occasionally funny soap opera.

    I haven't found any of the character development to be terribly interesting or new, this is all ground that's been covered before and I've never cared much for to begin with (not being in Hollywood and already having developed my own cynicism around the culture it creates). And Bojack's narration of his own failings becomes more tedium than pathos, nearing but ultimately failing to register with anything that feels real. Again, not being in Hollywood I find it hard to sympathize with a character's search for happiness and meaning when (spoiler alert) they find out egotism, gluttony, drugs, and fame don't hold the answers (who'dve thunk?).

    Still, there are enough chuckle moments, fun side stories involving Todd or Mr. Peanut Butter (far and away my two favorite characters), animal jokes, great music (theme song and its variations are some of the best music to come out of any television recently), and interesting turns to keep me compelled and entertained through the episodes. I won't be sitting on the edge of my seat for Season 3, but when it comes around I'll shrug my shoulders, say what the hey, and check on everyone's favorite hopelessly lost can't seem to do anything right horse. Don't act like you don't know.
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  2. Aug 9, 2015
    6
    What started as a solid show ends on a low note that leaves me about in the same place I was with season 1. It was good, enjoyable, but not great. The creators seemed to choose something truly entertaining with likeable characters over the Hollywood cliche. I get that its a show about the Hollywood cliche, but I never found that premise to be that appealing.
  3. Jul 21, 2015
    4
    I was disappointed. I saw the first season for the first time yesterday, and watched the second today. The second season is a completely different show, and I don't really like that new show.

    See, the first season opens with Bojack explaining that in horsin' around (his sitcom), in 30 minutes, the characters meets a problem and fixes it with no consequences in his love and his family.
    I was disappointed. I saw the first season for the first time yesterday, and watched the second today. The second season is a completely different show, and I don't really like that new show.

    See, the first season opens with Bojack explaining that in horsin' around (his sitcom), in 30 minutes, the characters meets a problem and fixes it with no consequences in his love and his family.
    It was pointing out that this series wasn't going to do that.
    Well, the second season does that.

    While the first season could get really dark, and tried its best to develop its main characters, the second season is a lot less successful at doing so.

    - Bojack faces very few problems that lasts more than one episode.
    - Todd is getting a lot more screen-time, but is still developed as a comic relief.
    - Bojack's girlfriend is a new character that could be developed and discover the awful society that Bojack lives, could face many interesting problems, but instead, her very first trait of character becomes just a reason to make jokes after the first episode.
    - Diane was the only character with a believable problem, but its building was rushed, and so was the resolving (although, it was still a touching moment).

    Many of the characters are this way. Sure, there are some touching moments, but the main characters aren't the same (their "evolution" isn't believable) and the secondary characters got more important without getting more developed.

    So what's left from the first season of Bojack that wasn't lost in the second season?
    The humor is still the same. It's more present, so if you laughed a lot at the first season, you'll probably like the second.
    But I didn't see the first season as a comedy. I didn't laugh all that much (I sometimes did, of course), but it wasn't the humor that kept me on the edge of my seat.

    The animation is also still the same, but to be honest, it's clearly not the focus of the series.

    Overall, is it bad ? No. I didn't like it, but I can see how one could enjoy it.
    Is it as good as the first season ? Definitely not.
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Metascore
90

Universal acclaim - based on 7 Critic Reviews

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 7 out of 7
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 7
  3. Negative: 0 out of 7
  1. Jul 20, 2015
    100
    Netflix's BoJack Horseman has found its footing beautifully in season two, earning the title of not just the streaming service's best show, but of one of television's best shows.
  2. Reviewed by: Sonia Saraiya
    Jul 20, 2015
    90
    BoJack Horseman is deeply, ridiculously funny.
  3. Reviewed by: Liz Shannon Miller
    Jul 17, 2015
    91
    So much of the BoJack DNA is tied up in BoJack's origin story as a '90s network sitcom star because the show itself is actively working against the concept that sitcoms represent the way stories should work; that there are easy answers for any of its characters. And that's what makes it feel so fundamentally true, at its core.