Metascore
66

Generally favorable reviews - based on 19 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 11 out of 19
  2. Negative: 0 out of 19

Critic Reviews

  1. Reviewed by: Amy Glynn
    May 31, 2019
    91
    The script is, unsurprisingly, annunciation-grade, luminously funny and strikingly poignant—and considering the principal characters include angels, demons and witches, (and a tween Antichrist) it’s as human as they come. ... But as good as everything is, as good as everyone is, the locus of this translation’s magic is the to-perish-for chemistry between Michael Sheen’s angel Aziraphale and David Tennant’s demon Crowley.
  2. Reviewed by: Mike Hale
    May 31, 2019
    80
    Diverting and mostly pleasurable. ... The BBC Studios production is studded with piquant performances by veteran actors, mostly British.
  3. Reviewed by: Nick Schager
    May 31, 2019
    80
    Gaiman manages the not-inconsiderable feat of capturing his narrative’s race-against-the-clock propulsion, all while making plenty of time for an overstuffed cast of characters and numerous detours, rewinds, asides and demented flights of fancy. Good Omens boasts an assured sense of tone from the very start. ... Good Omens wouldn’t soar without its two leads, who are so perfectly (mis)matched that they immediately elevate the series to must-see status.
  4. Reviewed by: Lorraine Ali
    May 31, 2019
    80
    The story itself falls apart and reassembles several times per each hour-long episode, but when viewed as a collection of clever sketches by master performers it’s a fun frolic — and with a cast of biblical proportions.
  5. Reviewed by: Tim Goodman
    May 29, 2019
    80
    The end result is a feel-good romp and creative triumph that is easily digestible and never flags in search of entertainment.
  6. Reviewed by: Danette Chavez
    May 30, 2019
    75
    Good Omens soars when it focuses on the buddy comedy between Aziraphale and Crowley, who are tasked with keeping mortals on the straight and narrow and luring them away from it, respectively, neglect their duties, either by aiding the first couple cast out from Eden, or by partaking of the many wonderful things humans have created. ... It’s when the series looks elsewhere for its drama and humor that it starts to falter.
  7. Reviewed by: Aja Romano
    May 31, 2019
    70
    With Gaiman at the helm, and with an ample amount of time to do the book’s nuances justice, Good Omens succeeds much better than any recent Gaiman (or Pratchett) adaptation in memory. But we’re still ultimately left with a screenplay that faithfully emphasizes Good Omens’ plot rather than its profundities or literary flourishes.
  8. Reviewed by: Sophie Gilbert
    May 31, 2019
    70
    Good Omens is frivolous in tone to the point of being glib, while its recurring jokes recur so often that they run out their welcome (Crowley gets scenes scored to virtually every track in the Queen songbook, while Aziraphale’s story lines frequently feature his obsession with eating). What sets the series apart is the relationship between two polar opposites who end up realizing, as the best antagonists do, that they’re not that different after all.
  9. Reviewed by: Allison Shoemaker
    May 30, 2019
    70
    When Gaiman and Mackinnon return to those actors [Sheen and Tennant], the series becomes the compelling story of an unlikely friendship, a sort of undefined rom-com between two immortals with the end of the world as a quirky backdrop. That’s the “Good Omens” worth watching. The rest of it’s not bad—not world-ending, but not exactly heavenly, either.
  10. Reviewed by: Brian Lowry
    May 30, 2019
    70
    The Lord really does work in mysterious ways in Good Omens, which -- given the recent abundance of apocalyptic series -- is surprisingly good, and even when it lags, considerable fun.
  11. 70
    Even though the major pieces are there — Aziraphale, Crowley, Satan, God, apocalypse — the minor bits aren’t magical enough on their own. It doesn’t quite pull together as a great, glorious, goofy Almighty plan. But it is still fun, and stylish, and it has enough of the book’s original quirky spark to feel worthwhile.
  12. Reviewed by: Isaac Butler
    May 31, 2019
    60
    Good Omens is at its best when it’s a Divine (Buddy) Comedy. Sheen and Tennant, wonderful actors unafraid to let out their inner cheeseball, have great chemistry and know how to sell a joke. ... Whenever the show departs from the two leads, however, the life seeps out of it.
  13. Reviewed by: Vinnie Mancuso
    May 22, 2019
    60
    Good Omens‘ six episodes feel breezy thanks to a slick directing job from Douglas Mackinnon (Knightfall), but its narratively all over the place. To be fair, that’s often by design.
  14. Reviewed by: Ed Bark
    May 30, 2019
    58
    Good Omens continues to have its special effects moments. But there aren’t enough of them to overcome the basic tedium afflicting it.
  15. Reviewed by: Ben Travers
    May 28, 2019
    58
    The six-episode limited series loses momentum as it goes, making the teased possibility of a sequel less and less appealing. Still, the comic pairing of Sheen and Tennant could carry a story all its own, if only their creators would leave them alone to their own devices.
  16. Reviewed by: Melanie McFarland
    May 28, 2019
    50
    There’s about 50% too much content distracting from the core strength of Neil Gaiman’s latest series: the glorious onscreen chemistry shared by David Tennant ("Doctor Who") and Michael Sheen ("The Good Fight").
  17. Reviewed by: Judy Berman
    May 23, 2019
    50
    It’s a lot, and sometimes the pace is more exhausting than bracing. At the same time, the show’s underlying ideas about tribalism and friendship are pretty commonplace. Still, Tennant and Sheen make an ideal buddy-comedy duo; their banter does justice to Gaiman (who adapted the novel and is an executive producer of the miniseries) and the late Pratchett’s witty prose.
  18. Reviewed by: Tim Surette
    May 22, 2019
    50
    The end of the world sounds pretty terrible, but turns out it's tolerable as long as David Tennant is there.
  19. Reviewed by: Daniel D'Addario
    May 20, 2019
    40
    Onscreen, this pairing — between a saintly being played by Michael Sheen and a fallen angel played by David Tennant, both seeking to save the world for their own reasons — is the best part of the new “Good Omens” limited series. But it’s not enough: This six-hour journey towards the end of time comes to feel grindingly slow by the end, more anticlimax than fight for Earth’s future. ... That it ends up saying so little feels like a missed opportunity.
User Score
7.8

Generally favorable reviews- based on 61 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 49 out of 61
  2. Negative: 8 out of 61
  1. May 31, 2019
    10
    It was amazing, I haven't read the book, but after watching it I will! David Tennant was great! I wasn't expecting to hear Queen songs:)
  2. Jun 2, 2019
    5
    I'm disappointed. It comes off more like a cross of The Omen and Little Nicky. It's a bit silly for the topic, which makes sense if it wereI'm disappointed. It comes off more like a cross of The Omen and Little Nicky. It's a bit silly for the topic, which makes sense if it were poking fun at religion, but it's not. Full Review »
  3. Jun 1, 2019
    10
    A disclaimer first: Good Omens is my all time favorite book. The blend of Gaiman's dark lunacy and Pratchett's penchant for fanciful satireA disclaimer first: Good Omens is my all time favorite book. The blend of Gaiman's dark lunacy and Pratchett's penchant for fanciful satire blend into the best take on armageddon I've ever read (certainly better than that mushroom fueled madness of Revelations). So I was nervous about the TV version.

    Fortunately, they made the very wise decision to make this a six hour mini series rather than a two hour movie, which allows for the entire story to play out completely (along with some added framing mechanisms which serve the visual medium well).

    No spoilers here: just to say this is a wild ride, following different characters various narratives, using non linear narrative just as often as not, and allowing itself the liberty to be frivolous as well as profound throughout the journey. Hats off to Gaiman; Terry would be proud of your efforts.
    Full Review »