• Network:
  • Series Premiere Date: Nov 29, 2016
Season #: 1, 2
Leah Remini: Scientology and the Aftermath Image
Metascore
65

Generally favorable reviews - based on 7 Critics What's this?

User Score
8.3

Universal acclaim- based on 21 Ratings

Your Score
0 out of 10
Rate this:
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 1
  • 0
  • 0
  • Summary: In the docuseries Leah Remini talks about Scientology and interviews former Scientologists about their experiences.
  • Genre(s): Reality, News/Documentary, Documentary

Where To Watch

Stream On
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 4 out of 7
  2. Negative: 0 out of 7
  1. Reviewed by: Dan Fienberg
    Nov 29, 2016
    70
    Engrossing, but probably not as captivating as what's taking place to get the show to air. .... Leah Remini: Scientology and the Aftermath will stir up some viewer emotions, but it's not a dynamic series, even with the added footage of Remini and Rinder in transit between interviews. It's a lot of sitting around talking, interspersed with footage from fairly innocuous Scientology promotional videos and event interviews.
  2. Reviewed by: Sophie Gilbert
    Nov 29, 2016
    70
    It isn’t hugely dynamic as a viewing experience, with a heavy reliance on talking-head interviews, archival footage of Scientology events, schlocky B-roll footage, and basso profundo sound effects to indicate tension. But Remini’s presence is compelling (and frequently wacky), while her outrage at the institution she grew up in seems deeply felt.
  3. Reviewed by: Melanie McFarland
    Nov 29, 2016
    70
    What Scientology and the Aftermath lacks in cinematic polish and the caliber of familiar celebrities featured in “Going Clear”--director Paul Haggis, one of the most famous Hollywood adherents to publicly defect from the Church prior to Remini, led off Gibney’s documentary--is somewhat supplanted by Remini’s honest anger and frustration, both of which blaze across the screen in reaction to particularly damning revelations. Remini’s overall likability is this program’s most valuable asset.
  4. Reviewed by: Mark A. Perigard
    Nov 29, 2016
    67
    The show, like so many unscripted series, can be repetitive. ... But in taking a light to an alley few dare to tread, Remini may have given some viewers out there more than a hope and a prayer.
  5. Reviewed by: Meredith Blake
    Nov 29, 2016
    60
    [Remini] comes off as authentic, even if Scientology and the Aftermath can also seem self-serving.
  6. Reviewed by: Ken Tucker
    Nov 29, 2016
    60
    Toward the end of the premiere, Remini is shown saying she’s hearing the same stories “over and over”--that the abuse and harassment former members are subjected to have similar traits. Unfortunately, that’s not much of an incentive to keep watching her series, which even during the first hour becomes a little repetitive. Nevertheless, Remini comes across as a sincere crusader.
  7. Reviewed by: Verne Gay
    Nov 29, 2016
    58
    Nothing much new here (based on the first hour), but Remini appears resolute, tough-talking and potentially formidable.
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 3 out of 3
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 3
  3. Negative: 0 out of 3
  1. Jan 17, 2017
    10
    This series has proven to be engrossing on every level. The dark secrets of Scientology were previously a mystery to most people, outside ofThis series has proven to be engrossing on every level. The dark secrets of Scientology were previously a mystery to most people, outside of a few books or articles written over the years. Leah Remini and Mike Rinder allowed a raw look into the abuses perpetrated by the "church". I honestly believe that most "negative" reviews are being posted by people of the "church" in an effort to fair-game the people on the show who left the "church" when they realized it was a cult. Expand
  2. Nov 1, 2017
    10
    This is the most-important TV show of the last 50 years. Scientology's mind-control, blackmail, intimidation, outrageous and destructiveThis is the most-important TV show of the last 50 years. Scientology's mind-control, blackmail, intimidation, outrageous and destructive tactics are explored in detail . . . to the extent you see these tactics being used by other cults including David Koresh, and even Machiavellian co-workers. One basic trick Scientology uses to put its people in slavery but stay of out of jail is outrageous tactics to create evidence that the enslaved have voluntarily allowed Scientology to brutally abuse them. However, such tactics basically equate to forcing the victim to sign a confession under EXTREME EMOTIONAL DURESS AND EVEN FALSE IMPRISONMENT. Hopefully, this series will put Scientology's leaders in jail. Expand
  3. Dec 26, 2016
    10
    The Leah Remini's series is very true and accurate in the data exposed about the church. Many other people have experienced the same mentalThe Leah Remini's series is very true and accurate in the data exposed about the church. Many other people have experienced the same mental terrorism methods the church is using, always on the verge of the law, always hiding behind law firms speeches and "freedom of speech" amendment, whie forbidding that same freedom of speech to their members. Victims are innumerous. Only terror pressure from the church may make it seem like they are just a few. Expand