• Network: HBO
  • Series Premiere Date: Oct 2, 2016
Season #: 2, 1
Metascore
76

Generally favorable reviews - based on 29 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 26 out of 29
  2. Negative: 0 out of 29

Where To Watch

Buy On

Critic Reviews

  1. Reviewed by: David Wiegand
    Apr 17, 2018
    100
    There is plenty of action and violence in the first half of the season, but what will empower the show’s longevity is its metaphysical theme, the exploration of the meaning and definition of human existence.
  2. Reviewed by: Kristen Baldwin
    Apr 13, 2018
    91
    Westworld is enthralling even for those who prefer a passive viewing experience. The sweeping shots of big-sky grandeur! The endlessly creative violence! (Three words: Human railroad crossties.) And the performances--Wood slips seamlessly between characters (Dolores, Rancher’s Daughter, Wyatt).
  3. TV Guide Magazine
    Reviewed by: Matt Roush
    Apr 26, 2018
    90
    Boldly playing with time and perspective, Westworld keeps you wondering what's real, even as dangerous parks are revealed. [30 Apr - 13 May 2018, p.13]
  4. Reviewed by: Rob Lowman
    Apr 19, 2018
    90
    [Westworld] impressively returns. ... The series usually hits the mark with strong storytelling that gives you a lot to ponder after the shooting is over. And the performances are outstanding. This year, the females are leading the way. Newton is a joy to watch and Wood shimmers, clearly embracing the new Delores.
  5. Reviewed by: Rob Owen
    Apr 19, 2018
    85
    It takes a bit for Westworld to get back up to full steam, but by episode three (five hours were made available to TV critics), this futuristic, violent drama returns to fine form, introducing new parts of the park (Shogun World!), new characters and apparently new technology goals on the part of Delos, the corporation that owns Westworld.
  6. Reviewed by: Ed Bark
    Apr 19, 2018
    83
    Throughout these first five episodes, Westworld continues to have a mind-bending mind of its own, sometimes to the point of being close to nonsensical. It’s also a non-stop killing field, and that gets to be off-putting after a while. But Westworld also remains picturesque, challenging and undeniably distinct.
  7. Reviewed by: Alex McLevy
    Apr 17, 2018
    83
    Westworld season two goes to some unsettling and unpleasant places--it’s not always a fun watch--but as it settles into a chaotic groove, the show is becoming a thrilling mind-bender, laced with just enough intellectual resin to give all that bloodshed a savvy frisson of wit.
  8. Reviewed by: Sophie Gilbert
    Apr 23, 2018
    80
    Still, Season 2 of Westworld is always absorbing, and more dynamic in its pacing than Season 1. It’s also graced with some tremendous performers, notably Wood, Newton, and Jeffrey Wright.
  9. Reviewed by: Lorraine Ali
    Apr 20, 2018
    80
    It's poised to be a intellectually stimulating and emotionally bumpy ride, where the very concept of your existence becomes the stuff of high-brow entertainment and low-bar thrills.
  10. Reviewed by: Hank Stuever
    Apr 20, 2018
    80
    Rather than reflect the panicky, competitive rush that results in all these half-thought, half-finished, fairly expensive and certainly mediocre series, Westworld demonstrates the proper way to spend a lot of time and money in a meticulous fashion.
  11. Reviewed by: Ken Tucker
    Apr 20, 2018
    80
    Westworld, with its florid dialogue and languid self-seriousness, isn’t as much fun as Twin Peaks was. But it’s also easy to see why Westworld is the much more popular show. It’s tapping in to currents in our culture, our feelings that the world has become a far more confusing place, with power struggles that threaten any possible unity or peace. We can’t saddle up and shoot-’em-up, but we can escape and watch others do it for us on Sunday nights.
  12. Reviewed by: Joseph Falcone
    Apr 18, 2018
    80
    A lot has changed in the second season of HBO’s arcane sci-fi thriller, but the show’s ensemble remains its most prized asset, notably Evan Rachel Wood and newcomer Peter Mullan (Sunset Song).
  13. Reviewed by: Brian Tallerico
    Apr 18, 2018
    80
    It loses its footing sometimes (it did in year one, too), but this is still smart television with film-caliber production values and incredible performances. Sometimes the writing can call a bit too much attention to itself, but the writers are smart enough in season two to avoid piling more puzzles on top of the ones they created in season one.
  14. Reviewed by: Tim Goodman
    Apr 13, 2018
    80
    There's never a sense that Westworld has tripped up, run out of ideas or reverted to some kind of redundancy. On the contrary, the series offers revelatory possibilities and pursues them in massively entertaining fashion.
  15. 80
    Season two doubles down on the show’s meta tendencies. The Man in Black repeatedly announces that, thanks to the revolt, the stakes of the “game” that is Westworld (and presumably also the show that is Westworld) have been raised in a way that makes the entire thing more interesting. He’s not wrong.
  16. Reviewed by: Allison Keene
    Apr 13, 2018
    80
    Westworld is playing with a myriad of timelines again, with some mystery attached to them. But the personal reveals within them are far more satisfying, with particularly great work done by Peter Mullan as William/The Man in Black’s father-in-law James Delos, and from Wright as an ailing but crucially awakened Bernard.
  17. Reviewed by: Sonia Saraiya
    Apr 25, 2018
    75
    With much more centripetal force than last season, it also draws the audience towards its own center, in its own vivid journey toward self-consciousness.
  18. Reviewed by: Verne Gay
    Apr 20, 2018
    75
    Blessedly for fans who don’t want to work so hard, less so for those wonks who do, the second season is much easier. It’s still brainy while managing to push the new narrative ahead hard and fast. It also manages to splatter the brains too: Westworld is now less a searing indictment of screen violence (the first season) and more a straight-up snuff series.
  19. Reviewed by: Kelly Lawler
    Apr 13, 2018
    75
    Now that the hard work is over, the series is more assured, faster-paced and easier to watch. The characters feel more lived-in, and the dialogue, music and settings can be self-referential. Each scene conveys more meaning.
  20. Reviewed by: Ben Travers
    Apr 13, 2018
    75
    All around, the actors remain strong, including a number of new cast members. Where Season 2 stumbles is its structure and pacing. Episodes don’t carve equal time for everyone; they focus on the two most connected stories and sometimes break for an entire hour without getting back to a series regular.
  21. Reviewed by: Brian Lowry
    Apr 19, 2018
    70
    Westworld remains a hugely ambitious series, painted on a sweeping, star-studded canvas that continues to expand in the second season. Yet the first half of that run repeats the show's more impenetrable drawbacks -- playing three-dimensional chess, while spending too much time sadistically blowing away pawns. The result is a show that's easier to admire than consistently like.
  22. Reviewed by: Todd VanDerWerff
    Apr 18, 2018
    70
    When it works, there’s nothing like it on TV. When it doesn’t, it’s hard not to watch in fascination as the train flies off the tracks, wondering if it might land back on them or this time finally plummet into the gorge below.
  23. Reviewed by: James Poniewozik
    Apr 18, 2018
    70
    Don’t expect too much improvement too fast from Westworld 2.0. It’s still overly focused on balletic blood baths and narrative fake-outs, and much of the dialogue still sounds as if it were written as a tagline for a subway poster, like Dolores’s “I have one last role to play: myself.” But Westworld remains a glorious production to look at, and there are stretches where it feels invigorated by its new, expanded world--freer to breathe, relax, invent.
  24. Reviewed by: Maureen Ryan
    Apr 13, 2018
    70
    The good news is, several glitches and structural issues have been corrected and modestly improved in Westworld 2.0. The operating system is smoother, but the drama’s most insistent claim — or aspiration — is that it has achieved full sentience, or at least a modicum of arresting originality.
  25. Reviewed by: Alan Sepinwall
    Apr 13, 2018
    70
    It’s still not a great show, but it’s a much more enjoyable one to watch this time around.
  26. Reviewed by: Michael Haigis
    Apr 17, 2018
    63
    Yet while the series is evolving somewhat beyond the hermetic, enigmatic structure of its first season, it still veers too frequently into simplistic misanthropy. Throughout season two, the newly sentient robots are often as vicious and single-minded as their human captors once were.
User Score
7.0

Generally favorable reviews- based on 313 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Negative: 57 out of 313
  1. May 11, 2018
    4
    Two episodes into the second season and Westworld lost its intrigue; it's just a shooting gallery, full of murder and mayhem. Every guestTwo episodes into the second season and Westworld lost its intrigue; it's just a shooting gallery, full of murder and mayhem. Every guest character is now a disposable moron or a Cannon Fodder for the hosts. The world was created for the elite, but it seems no one in the real world cares that hundreds of elites go missing. Evan Rachel Wood as Dolores is an absolute snooze fest with way too much screen time. So many loop holes in the advanced technology kind of like Star Wars tech; you would think that the hosts could be identified and located by the technology that created them. Overall its suffering the Walking Dead syndrome of style without substance. Full Review »
  2. Apr 22, 2018
    6
    boy that premiere was a big ole mess, a lot of tense music but ridiculously drawn out meaningless scenes, we're no closer to actual plotboy that premiere was a big ole mess, a lot of tense music but ridiculously drawn out meaningless scenes, we're no closer to actual plot progression than the appearance of the clean up crews, and that's it. i do hope this gets better, cause more of what we got here just isn't going to cut it for me. Full Review »
  3. Jul 8, 2018
    4
    After three episodes I called this what this had become, style without substance. Season one was both, but this seemed to be a meanderingAfter three episodes I called this what this had become, style without substance. Season one was both, but this seemed to be a meandering mess. After seeing the entire second season, I can confirm that was accurate.

    There are too many breaks in continuity, especially being able to simply reboot a dead host without repairs. It that were possible then it would have been done throughout season one by the technicians instead of carrying them. To make that even worse, they do not reliably even use that plot device for sentient hosts. Then there is the repetition within story lines. Once is interesting, twice is boring, and a third time is a criminal waste of time. By the end of the season, they even devolve to that old trope where no one knows if they are real or a replicant.

    I will not be surprised if next season I read that they are now suggesting everyone is just in the Matrix, or it was all just a dream. I certainly am getting off this train before it hits the mountain.
    Full Review »