Alan Scherstuhl

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For 569 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 61% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Alan Scherstuhl's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Particle Fever
Lowest review score: 0 Collateral Beauty
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 40 out of 569
569 movie reviews
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    It's squirrelly, surprising, and elusive, but this beaut of a debut is no curio.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    [A] studious, rigorous, and surprisingly tender documentary.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film is a wonder of desert skies, slick tunnels, bumptious fence- and wall-climbing, and occasional staged reveries.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    This marvelous, mostly animated doc/drama hybrid couldn't have come along at a better time.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    This isn't a film about the Civil War; it's about the minds of white folks so removed from plantation life that they feel they have no stake in it at all. It's not about back then — it's about being.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Israel's willingness to honor Frank's own vision powers the film.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Even as it verges on melodrama, Ixcanul remains fascinated by its people's practical thinking, by how their contemporary circumstances — and occasionally premodern beliefs — lead to actions both relatable and achingly, disastrously not.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    It's rare that a film this outraged is also this calm.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Anna Biller's ripe, vibrant The Love Witch is an act of reclamation — and love.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    The world needs to see this spare, revelatory film and hear these girls' pained and sometimes proud confessions.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Get Out is fully surprising in both concept and craft, with the scares never coming just when you expect them and the secrets more audacious than you might be guessing.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Marczak has captured the specifics of these young folks as they reel through a city that’s been born again, but the film should stir something true in the chest of anyone who ever was lucky enough to run free in their youth, even if only for a night.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    The ending is a joy and a heartbreaker, but what lingers from this revelatory life is that compact world Jeanne inhabits, and how each tragedy, each happiness, and each everyday gesture together accrete into the woman we discover again and again.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Matter-of-fact in its scenecraft but searing in its content, Sami Blood is about girlhood and racism, passing and escape.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Raising Bertie charts nothing less than what it’s like to try to grow up free in the prison capital of the world.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Spider-Man: Homecoming is comics, unapologetically, as close as blockbuster filmmaking gets to cartooning.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    First-time feature director Gregor never imposes a narrative arc on his subjects; instead, we meet them, hear their hopes and their fears, and then savor performances of singular beauty, power, and invention.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Few period pieces get our dynamic relationship with the now so right, or chart so smartly how the present shifts even under the feet of the youngish.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    There’s nothing fussy about any shot of Nobody’s Watching, but there’s also no shot wasted, and no shot that doesn’t communicate something vital about the city or her protagonist.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Amman Abbasi’s lush and tender here’s-what-life’s-like debut, Dayveon, captures, in scenes of pained beauty, an adolescent wanderlust that Abbasi’s camera just seems to be observing.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Director Richard LaGravenese, who also adapted the novel, lavishes the material with greater wit than its demographic demands, and the central love story feels warm-blooded—the air prickles between the leads.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Despite its moral seriousness, the film's a crowd-pleaser, boasting tense set pieces, a raucous polyglot of voices and accents, beauty-in-poverty streetscapes, and two warm, brawling, big-hearted leads.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film is like his life: scabrous, upsetting, kind of moving, funny as hell, alive with hints of how we've become what we are.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    If you somehow manage to stay dry-eyed through the concert numbers, the end should set you bawling.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film is often beautiful and appealingly light. Every clear-eyed insight into why pushy people insist on pushing is matched by loose ensemble humor and lyric reveries.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The funny stuff outweighs the cock-ups, and supporting performances from Stephen Merchant and Minnie Driver kick the movie toward something grander.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The ending is a bit of an audience-pleasing cop-out, a retreat into formula after 80 minutes or so of upending it. But those upendings are memorable, the cast dishy fun, and Jerusha Hess and Shannon Hale's breeze of a script (based on Hale's novel) is smart about the allure of fictional romances.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    David M. Rosenthal's sturdy, nasty rural noir, based on Matthew F. Jones's novel, is so sharp and rusted through that, after taking it in, you'll likely need a tetanus shot.

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