Alan Sepinwall

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For 776 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Alan Sepinwall's Scores

Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Gilmore Girls: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 In the Motherhood: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 80 out of 776
776 tv reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Sepinwall
    The sheer amount of cussing is so great that even the unoffended may be too distracted by it to pay attention to anything else in Deadwood. That would be unfortunate, because lurking just behind the wall of profanity is a magnificent, fire-breathing work of art - an amazing meditation on violence, social order and the cruel reality of the Wild West. [21 Mar 2004, p.1]
    • Newark Star-Ledger
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Sepinwall
    Whedon tries to blend comedy, horror and action, a very combustible mixture - as evidenced by the wildly uneven "Buffy" movie - but he seems close to perfecting the formula here. [10 Mar 1997, p.31]
    • Newark Star-Ledger
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    The show is trying to depict a good cross-section of the city's cop culture. But the scenes with the uniform cops - Ben McKenzie as a young quick study, Michael Cudlitz as his gruff but clever training officer - are just much more vibrant and memorable than anything with the detectives.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Alan Sepinwall
    This is a very smart show about incredibly smart people, and it's only gotten better as it's gone along.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Sepinwall
    With the start of season two, it looks like the expectations might finally meet the reality--or however real a show with aliens and time travel can get.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Alan Sepinwall
    Community is back, and back to being itself.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Alan Sepinwall
    It was addictive then, and it's addictive now.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Sepinwall
    The whole space cowboy gimmick shouldn't work, but Whedon and co-creator Tim Minear have managed to create a world where space stations and men on horseback can plausibly co-exist. Little touches like deliberately old-fashioned dialogue - one character describes the bar fight as "just an honest brawl between folk" - help immensely. [19 Sept 2002]
    • Newark Star-Ledger
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Alan Sepinwall
    Like Rick Grimes, all I can do is focus on what lies directly in front of me, and the here and now of The Walking Dead looks very good.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Sepinwall
    The characters are so richly-drawn, and so wonderfully-played, that the exposition ultimately isn't that great a stumbling block. I wanted to know more about these characters, and within an episode or so was eager for any bit of backstory that helped better clarify all the relationships.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Sepinwall
    And as the new season begins, it becomes clear that gags are easier to write in abundance than gag lyrics. The non-melodic portions of the show are still a scream.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Alan Sepinwall
    The first two episodes of the new season don't suggest a huge creative leap--Carmichael is still finding his way as an actor, for instance, though the creative team recognizes that he's best used to say incendiary things that his co-stars can react to-but even if it never improves from its original baseline, it's funny and well-crafted enough to be worth watching for more than just its ambitions.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Alan Sepinwall
    It evokes "Oz" in a very, very good way: it doesn't feel quite like anything that's been put on television (if we're still calling Netflix "television") before.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Alan Sepinwall
    This is a good, solid show that understands its strengths and keeps playing to them in season 2.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Alan Sepinwall
    I expected to be tired of the joke behind The Wrong Mans within an episode or two. Instead, I found myself engrossed enough in the story of who wanted Sam dead at any particular moment, and why, to keep watching until I made it all the way to the end and could appreciate just how well Baynton, Corden and company stuck the landing.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Sepinwall
    Last fall, "Studio 60" would have easily been the best new drama; this fall, it's lucky to squeeze into the top five, and a lot of that is based on potential more than what's on screen.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Sepinwall
    The humor provided by the new setting makes the show a bit more palatable than it was last season, but Nip/Tuck is still Nip/Tuck, for both good and ill.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Sepinwall
    Whether Tara is herself or someone else (including a new alter), "Tara" works as both a character drama and an absurdist family comedy because the characters are so well-drawn, and because what happened before isn't forgotten as the show moves forward.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Alan Sepinwall
    Beavis and Butt-Head are who they've always been, for ill or (comedically) for good. I'm glad to have them back.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Sepinwall
    Horne and Page have sweet chemistry, but what makes the show work is the cast of eccentrics that Corden and Jones have created around them.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Sepinwall
    Last year's body count also makes some of this year's deaths feel routine; I spent a good chunk of the early episodes figuring out which characters had lived just a little too long, if you know what I mean.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Sepinwall
    Thanks to the sharp writing of Warren Leight and a revelatory lead performance by obscure journeyman actor Holt McCallany, Lights Out is a reminder of why Hollywood keeps making boxing stories. Because when they're done well, they're irresistible.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Alan Sepinwall
    The show as a whole moves briskly and confidently.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Alan Sepinwall
    It's a treat to be back in this world again, and perhaps by the end of this season I'll feel happier about the crime arc than I did about the spy stuff.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    If you're not expecting much, you'll come away satisfied. But compared to a good episode of "Family Guy" - or even a mediocre "Simpsons" episode - it's pretty thin gruel. [28 Apr 2005]
    • Newark Star-Ledger
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Sepinwall
    The first two ABC episodes of Scrubs, premiering back-to-back tomorrow night, more closely resemble the series in its marvelous early seasons, and suggest that Braff's victory lap will be a memorable one.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Sepinwall
    The performances by the three lead actresses (and by Amanda Seyfried as Paxton and Tripplehorn's eldest daughter) are so strong, and the nuances of life in such a complicated relationship so endlessly fascinating, that I'll suffer through the rest for a few episodes at a time before Bill's unsettling stare or Roman's calm, criminal sense of entitlement chases me off again.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Alan Sepinwall
    Mr. Robot is compulsively watchable and interesting. It's a reminder that even the most well-worn cliches can still work with the right execution.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Sepinwall
    I don't have much new to say about the third season of Jackie, because the show's strengths and weaknesses are the same as they've always been.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Sepinwall
    The only real sin of "Joan" so far is the presence of Joe Mantegna as Joan's police chief father. Mantegna, as always, is great, but his presence in what should be a small role apparently freaked out someone at CBS. So Hall tries to give him more to do by devoting a good chunk of each episode to unrelated crime stories - very mediocre ones, at that. [26 Sept 2003, p.57]
    • Newark Star-Ledger

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