For 126 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 57% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 41% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Amy Nicholson's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 Blue Ruin
Lowest review score: 0 3 Geezers!
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 49 out of 126
  2. Negative: 23 out of 126
126 movie reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Amy Nicholson
    As an action film — which in small bursts it is — Blue Ruin is disquieting and raw, like Commando turned inside out.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Amy Nicholson
    Director Rian Johnson's resulting film, a cornfield neo-noir, is the coolest, most-confident sci-fi flick since 2006's "Children of Men."
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Amy Nicholson
    Nebraska is the antidote to other family charmers about goofballs in matching sweaters.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Amy Nicholson
    It's impossible to watch The Punk Singer and not ask if feminism is dead. That's a fair starting question. But a better one is what if it isn't — what if we've just stopped recognizing it?
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Amy Nicholson
    Lord and Miller do great work within constraints, taking pre-made pieces and fashioning them into feats worthy of applause. It's no wonder they made a Lego movie — and it's no wonder it's so good.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Amy Nicholson
    Grand Budapest is Anderson's most mature film, and his most visually witty, too. It's playful without being self-congratulatory, and somehow lush without being cloying.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Amy Nicholson
    Rebel Wilson is the peroxided Aussi who stole scenes as Kristen Wiig's roommate in "Bridesmaids," and this is the role that will turn her into a star.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Amy Nicholson
    You're Next streamlines the gory stuff for something truly shocking: good characters. Not deep, mind you. But characters who are crayoned in bright enough that they're interesting even while alive.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Amy Nicholson
    The Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs franchise takes its comic cues from The Muppets and Pee Wee's Playhouse, kids' shows that ripen as their audience matures.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Amy Nicholson
    Stiller balances his big ambitions with small, grounded truths.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Amy Nicholson
    What lingers in Nathan's documentary isn't the swaggering trails of diesel fumes. It's the sadness of watching Pug narrow his options.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Amy Nicholson
    If the off-kilter pleasures of Volume I is von Trier enticing us to watch the rest, consider me seduced.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Amy Nicholson
    The script is solid, and the fight scenes are excellent.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Amy Nicholson
    Joe
    Joe is Cage's periodic reminder that he's one of his generation's great talents.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Amy Nicholson
    Esparza's cast of unknowns is so fresh and raw that the drama could be mistaken for a documentary if the camera work weren't so controlled.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Amy Nicholson
    Smart, empathetic and wholly believable.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Amy Nicholson
    Jaden Smith is destined to be a star by the force of will (and wallets) of parents Will and Jada Smith, both producers on The Karate Kid. But he's also got the raw material.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 80 Amy Nicholson
    What makes Forte so funny is that he stalks through the flick cocksure and utterly deadpan.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Amy Nicholson
    This documentary on one of the most universal, photographed, analyzed, opined upon and slavered over human experiences manages to astound.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Amy Nicholson
    For the small but enthusiastic documentary crowd and the comic's diehard fans, it's a must-see.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 80 Amy Nicholson
    Adam Green's inventively gruesome slasher is the widest unrated release in 25 years.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Amy Nicholson
    Ford is hilarious and brooding, deeply wrinkled and deeply intimidating. He's got the best lines, courtesy of screenwriter Aline Brosh McKenna (of the repellent "27 Dresses" and the much better "The Devil Wears Prada").
    • 39 Metascore
    • 80 Amy Nicholson
    Despite all the boobs, The Change-Up is very fair to its female characters-well, at least to Mann and Wilde, who both ring true, even if Wilde is almost too good to be true...It sounds like a trifling detail, but those details are sorely missing from most "date movies," in which even the women laughing in the audience exit feeling like they're the butt of the joke.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 80 Amy Nicholson
    Why is Emmerich elbowing his way into the conversation about Shakespearean authorship? Because the debate is explosive - and he can't resist packing on a few more pounds of dynamite on his confident drama of incest, greed and beheadings.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Amy Nicholson
    Meet the new face of superheroes: Marc Webb's totally teenage and totally fun take on the Spider-Man franchise.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 80 Amy Nicholson
    This over-the-top sequel caters to the lowest common denominator in the best possible way, and it's so fully committed to brainless bombast that it muscles audiences to applaud by sheer force of will.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 80 Amy Nicholson
    Every frame of silent, lip-biting, pent-up tension in the series has been holding its breath for this -- a 600-minute soap opera suddenly exploding into a Grindhouse slasher.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    Cumberbatch, a tweedy Brit with an M.A. in Classical Acting and a face like a monstrous Timothy Dalton, has beefed up to become a convincing killer. He's brutal and bold, and the film around him isn't bad either.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    Kills tops the 2010 original by not giving a mierda about logic or character.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    Kimberly Peirce changes almost nothing in her rallying remake of Brian De Palma’s classic about a troubled telekinetic teenager. She doesn’t have to.