Andrew Barker
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For 61 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 36% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 58% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Andrew Barker's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 50
Highest review score: 90 Love & Mercy
Lowest review score: 10 Behaving Badly
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 15 out of 61
  2. Negative: 14 out of 61
61 movie reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew Barker
    A wonderfully innervating cure for the common musical biopic, Bill Pohlad’s Love & Mercy vibrantly illuminates two major breakthroughs — one artistic, one personal — in the life of the Beach Boys’ Brian Wilson.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Barker
    [Swanberg's] latest work, All the Light in the Sky, displays a striking new willingness to meet his audience halfway, buttressing his signature style with clever pacing, solid technique and a deeply soulful lead performance from co-scripter Jane Adams.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Barker
    Lively, funny and at times philosophical, Brothers Hypnotic tackles the challenges of maintaining an independent music career, as well as some knotted generational conflicts, and handles it all with great sensitivity.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Barker
    Hansen-Love, who co-wrote the script along with her former-DJ brother Sven, zeroes in on the signature experiences of ’90s club life with expert precision.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Barker
    The film taps into far deeper, richer veins of material than it has the time to properly mine. It’s nonetheless a flinty, brainy, continually engrossing work that straddles the lines between biopic, political thriller and journalistic cautionary tale, driven by Jeremy Renner’s most complete performance since The Hurt Locker.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Barker
    At times there’s a genuine sense of daring to the film’s freewheeling anarchy, its refusal to stick to a central theme or impart any sort of lesson.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Barker
    The eighth entry in Disney’s eco-minded Disneynature series, Monkey Kingdom may well be its cheekiest, funniest and most purely entertaining.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew Barker
    Covering a broad swath of liberal economic theory in brisk, simply stated fashion, Inequality for All aims to do for income disparity what “An Inconvenient Truth” did for climate change.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew Barker
    Lewder, weirder, louder, leaner, meaner and more winningly stupid than anything its director Nicholas Stoller and star Seth Rogen have ever been involved with before, frat comedy Neighbors boasts an almost oppressive volume of outrageous gags.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew Barker
    Surely some of the film’s various incidents have been creatively stitched together from stray bits and pieces of footage, but its central conflict is an entirely organic one, and rarely is any offscreen string pulling distractingly evident.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew Barker
    Director Josh Boone is hardly the most distinctive cinematic stylist, but he’s smart enough to let his scenes linger for a few beats longer than most mainstream directors would, and seems to trust his actors to carry their own dramatic weight.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Andrew Barker
    The footage on display here is voluminous and intimate, briskly edited together in a sort of studiously haphazard way that syncs up perfectly with Madlib’s far-reaching soundtrack mix.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew Barker
    Unsatisfying on a musical level, it’s nonetheless a well-acted, sporadically impressive piece of filmmaking.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew Barker
    Thoroughly modern without being ostentatious about it, and featuring excellent performances from Kate Lyn Sheil and John Gallagher Jr., the film boasts pleasures more formal than narrative.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew Barker
    Boyle keeps the wheels churning nicely for the most part, and the climax ratchets up the pic’s sense of urgency without loosening its bearings.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Barker
    Full of warmth and refreshingly matter-of-fact sexuality, the film has its heart in the right place, yet it’s ultimately a bit blander than its subject matter ought to demand, and its chamber-piece intimacy and pileup of coincidences scan particularly awkwardly given its convincingly wide-open depiction of New York.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Barker
    Mercifully free of tongue-in-cheek meta-humor, Escape Plan is a likably lunkheaded meat-and-potatoes brawler that never pretends to be more sophisticated than it is.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Barker
    The haunted house setpieces provide reliable doses of jolts, even if one can see the scaffolding of each scare being built from miles away, and director Landon has fun with some clever camera placement here and there.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Barker
    Its potent sense of place and underlying ideas never compensate for the tiresome millennial musings that constitute most of its runtime.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Barker
    Too formally well crafted to be dismissed, but too straightforward and uncurious to be particularly exciting or insightful.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Barker
    While the film’s last two acts begin to deepen its characters in generally satisfying ways, You’re Not You throws down its initial gauntlet with an off-putting lack of subtlety.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Barker
    This tart, sexually frank portrait of a disintegrating relationship — and its long, bitter aftermath — packs plenty of punch in its best scenes, but it also frequently tests audience patience with its relentless deadpan affectlessness and insistence on leaving no Brooklyn cliche unmined.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Barker
    The film is an intriguing story passionately told, shot through and through with activist zeal, although a greater deal of distance might have allowed it to make a stronger case.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Barker
    Less a steadily escalating thriller than a guided tour through a county-fair-style haunted house, Poltergeist offers some quality jump scares, and Kenan has a knack for staging solid individual setpieces. But he proves weirdly incapable of modulation or mood setting here.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Barker
    Sometimes funny, often dumb, with equal doses of inside-baseball references and broad bro-ish boorishness, Entourage will be loved by fans and despised by detractors, possibly for the same reasons.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Barker
    The film’s central fivesome prove charming pallbearers throughout the film, which alternates between inspired and insipid as it hits its hagiographic marks.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Barker
    An impressive yet drama-less concoction that can’t totally disguise its slightly stale aftertaste.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Barker
    While the effort is admirable, the result is a bit unwieldy, casting too wide a net to really plumb its subject’s depths, and defanging some of Steadman’s acid wit with an overly busy, hit-and-miss aesthetic approach.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Barker
    Uncertain of tone, and bearing visible scarring from what one imagines were multiple rewrites, the film fails to probe the psychology of its subject or set up a satisfying alternate history, but it sure is nice to look at for 97 minutes.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Barker
    Muniz uncovers a raft of intriguing people and stories, with subjects ranging from sports to astrophysics, gender politics, history and developmental psychology, but he never sits still with them long enough to ask any probing questions, and the film never arrives at any real point.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Barker
    As handsome as his compositions are, Eastwood’s filmmaking simply doesn’t have the snap or the feel for rhythm that the script’s rapid-fire theatrical patter requires, and the relative dearth of prominent musical performances turns what could have been a dancing-in-the-aisles romp into a bit of a slog.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Barker
    Maria Sole Tognazzi’s ultra-sedate romantic comedy A Five Star Life is full of aesthetic sophistication and luxurious ambiance, but its pleasures are all secondhand, and the whole endeavor is too starved of incident to really stick in the memory.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Barker
    Its translation from stage to screen looks to have been a bit rocky, and the film never manages to transcend its actors-workshop aura and develop into something deeper.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Barker
    Sporadically very funny, mostly very tedious, and sometimes truly vile, this 18-years-too-late sequel nonetheless exhibits a certain puerile purity of purpose.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Barker
    It’s difficult to get past the film’s restless, ill-fittingly bombastic style.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Barker
    Curiously airless, weightless and tonally uncertain, the picture mixes mass murder, dismemberment and rape threats with sappy sentimentality, fish-out-of-water gags and groan-worthy meta-humor, yet very little of it manages to leave any impression.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Barker
    Runner Runner’s appeal increases dramatically whenever Affleck enters the frame.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Barker
    Essentially recasting “Grumpy Old Men” with the senescent specters of Rocky Balboa and Jake LaMotta, the result is sporadically amusing, with some chucklesome sight gags and crowdpleasing supporting turns from Alan Arkin and Kevin Hart, yet it’s all so overcooked that it defeats its own purpose.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Barker
    If the drably derivative, infuriatingly improbable police drama McCanick is remembered for anything, it will be for its uniformly overqualified cast.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Barker
    By trying to cram in as many explanatory info dumps as possible, Burger neglects to tend to the elements of the film that could easily make up for any narrative deficiencies: namely, a sense of place and a feeling of urgency.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Barker
    Most frustratingly, the film rarely manages to meld its two parent genres at all, with musical-theater pastiche dominating the early going, and straight slasher pastiche taking over around the halfway point, and rarely the twain do meet.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Barker
    Blended suffers from a fundamental lack of trust in its audience, following every unexpectedly smart exchange with a numbskull pratfall or one-liner, and every instance of genuine sincerity with an avalanche of schmaltz.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Barker
    A professionally assembled genre mashup that’s too silly to be scary, and a bit too dull to be a midnight-movie guilty pleasure.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Barker
    This basic-cable-quality farce is as unobjectionable as it is unmemorable.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Barker
    After providing some blissfully stupid B-movie thrills for its first hour, the film suffers from spectacle overkill.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Barker
    Unbalanced, unwieldy, and at times nearly unintelligible, Aloha is unquestionably Cameron Crowe’s worst film.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 30 Andrew Barker
    So fatally frontloaded with endless training montages, awfully written, indifferently acted drama, sports-film platitudes and jaw-dropping product placements that only the hardiest of viewers will make it through to the payoff.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 30 Andrew Barker
    An exceptionally poor piece of holiday cash-in product, rushed and ungainly even by the low standard set by Perry's seven previous Madea films, yet it should be every bit as profitable.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Andrew Barker
    The film expends plenty of effort crafting a few memorable freakout setpieces and nailing down the logistics of its found-footage camera placement, yet it offers precious little in the way of real scares or engaging characters, and even less in original ideas.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 30 Andrew Barker
    The film manages to be an often uncomfortable experience without fully embracing its own bad taste, starting with an inherently insane premise and somehow steering it through the most basic of romantic comedy paces.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 30 Andrew Barker
    A splashy-looking yet depressingly empty exercise that is never more shallow than the times when it tries to go deep.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 30 Andrew Barker
    Runs through spy-movie cliches with such dogged obligation that it often plays like a YouTube compilation of scenes from older, better thrillers, generating little overall tension and only occasionally approaching basic coherence.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 30 Andrew Barker
    The action sequences are competently directed, but exhibit virtually no flair or invention.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 30 Andrew Barker
    The film’s initial formulaic competence gives way to outright preposterousness rather quickly, hinging on idiot-plot character motivations.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Andrew Barker
    It’s easy to see a skewed argument in the making.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 30 Andrew Barker
    A few mildly tone-deaf jokes are hardly enough to sink Hot Pursuit. What does, however, is its tendency to belabor the laziest, most obvious gags beyond the point of reason.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 20 Andrew Barker
    The result is a slow-motion zeppelin crash that starts as a dull-edged fable, and then spirals further and further out of control without ever growing more exciting or interesting.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 10 Andrew Barker
    Utterly witless, listless, sparkless and senseless, this supernatural actioner makes one long for the comparative sophistication of the conceptually identical “Underworld” franchise (with which it shares producers and a writer).
    • 18 Metascore
    • 10 Andrew Barker
    [A] ruthlessly unfunny misfire.
    • 12 Metascore
    • 10 Andrew Barker
    With a “Sharknado”-inspired visual style and a deeply weary lead performance from Nicolas Cage, Left Behind is cheap-looking, overwrought kitsch of the most unintentionally hilarious order.

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