Andrew O'Hehir

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For 1,484 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Andrew O'Hehir's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 Caterpillar
Lowest review score: 0 Identity Thief
Score distribution:
1484 movie reviews
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Reygadas is an undeniably important artist hewing his own path, but who is also self-consciously playing to the tastes of a tiny elite audience that craves obscurantism, confrontation and heavy-handed symbolism. Still, I really want you to see this. Then I'll have somebody to talk about it with.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    While the portrayal of Southern race relations in the '60s is less central here than in "The Help," it's also less labored and earnest, and one could argue that it's subtler, more intimate and more honest.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    To my taste, savvy Hollywood veteran Bill Condon debuts as director of the two-part "Twilight" conclusion in satisfying fashion, delivering a voluptuous if often inert spectacle that splits the difference between high camp and decadent romance.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    LUV
    Both for good and for ill, LUV has a film-school feeling about it, and channels a legacy of fatalistic American crime cinema that includes "Mean Streets" and "Treasure of the Sierra Madre."
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    A handsome and well-acted film -- if you like that bitten-off, half-Hemingway style -- but also a grim, emotionally strangled one with a strong sadistic current, no genuinely likable characters and almost no humor.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    The 76-year-old Zeffirelli will make many more movies, but Tea With Mussolini has the unmistakable feeling of a personal testament. Its sunny disposition and modest wit are well-suited to the genial temper of this born entertainer.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Shrink offers a roster of wonderfully eccentric characterizations, shoehorned into a dramatic structure that's just a little too formulaic.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    A discombobulated summer movie that’s kind of fun but doesn’t have nearly enough story to fill up two hours.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Some fragments of that Dostoevskian romance linger on here: Just enough so that Wyatt and Wahlberg nail the climactic scene, when Jim is literally playing for his life, and make it momentarily seem to mean something. But not quite enough that you’ll remember what that something might be the next day.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    For deeply steeped Marvel Comics aficionados it will probably be fairly satisfying, and there’s no reason on earth why anyone else should even bother.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Even as Sylvester Stallone's long goodbye to the heroic underdog who made him famous descends from pathos into silliness, and from fairy tale into hallucination, you can't help liking the big galoot.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    It might be nice if Ghosts of Mars had more to offer than snappy repartee and shameless gore, or if it could borrow a little narrative tension from its Alien Chain Saw forebears.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    21
    Spacey's engaging for a while in one of his patented double-edged, sharky roles.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    The film's intimacy never feels fake, it's sporadically and unpredictably funny (I didn't exactly enjoy the cacophonous trumpet duet of the "1812 Overture," but I won't soon forget it), and the nonprofessional cast is surprisingly good.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    I personally find the Russo brothers’ lightning-fast action scenes difficult to process — it’s as if cinema editing now exceeds the speed of human brain functions — but they’re undoubtedly exciting and skillfully constructed.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    As utterly disastrous movies go, this one's really got something.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    For the most part it's a blast.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This film is an inevitable product of our age, and enjoyable, right up to whatever your ickiness threshold is.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    I wanted to take these two characters somewhere else and make a real movie about them...But Vaughn provides so many spooky, hilarious, unhinged moments, you won't mind sitting through it.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Never quite establishes its own identity, and when you remember it in two years it's likely to be that movie you saw that you kind of liked with that girl in it, what's her name, from TV.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's almost really cool, without quite being really cool.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    As to the question of whether Circumstance is actually a good film, or just one with an important story to tell, a high degree of difficulty and some hot all-girl action, I think the verdict is mixed.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    So subtle and subdued that it nearly undercuts itself. I'd describe it, in fact, as a film that doesn't quite work -- but the way it doesn't work is so distinctive and so interesting that it marks Jenkins as an exciting new face on the American indie scene.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a parlor trick, but it's a hell of a good one.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    An elegant but muddled affair, worth seeing despite (and maybe because of) its own split personality.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Citizen Koch is kind of a mess. But it’s a mess well worth discovering for yourself.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Despite its schizophrenic nature and often disagreeable characteristics, Broken English has flashes of something. You might say it has an integrity of purpose, if not of execution.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    In the end The Silence is more like an intriguing work of misdirection than a great crime film, but it has a dreamlike and disturbing undertow you won’t soon forget, and Odar is unquestionably a director to watch.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    22 Jump Street is the good-natured, sloppily rendered pile of balderdash for that moment, a movie that’s immune to all criticism and not worth bothering to dislike.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    That whole meta-biographical aspect doesn't bug me much because everybody who's ever written or directed a romantic comedy is drawing on their own emotional experience; this one's just a little more obvious about it.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Entirely watchable and often pretty fun, in a mishmashed, patchy kind of way.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Isn't much more than a student film made by a talented amateur who's in over his head. Burns has a decent eye and a breezy sense of pace, and he'll make better movies if he remembers where he came from.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Whatever we may make of van Gogh's life and death, Buscemi's talky, stagey Interview -- the first of three van Gogh adaptations planned by American actor-directors -- doesn't make much of a case for him as an important or original artist.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    If Paranoid Park is mainly an accumulation of the signs and symbols and images inside Van Sant's own head, that's artistically legitimate. When he makes a feeble effort to connect Alex's plight to the Iraq war and the cultural climate of Bush-era America, I just don't buy it.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This movie isn’t nearly as terrible as I was expecting, largely due to Snyder’s OCD-level attention to the visual details. And, yes, due to Wonder Woman (played by Israeli actress Gal Gadot), who brings in a badly needed dose of “Dragon Tattoo”-style female energy.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Ultimately I’m going to vote with my heart and say you should see it, largely for the brooding, physical performance of Tom Hardy, an actor still a shade too peculiar for Hollywood stardom, along with the ominous evocation of Stalin’s Russia on the cusp of change. But that recommendation comes with many asterisks, and in various respects Child 44 is a lost opportunity or, as they teach us to say in film-critic academy, an “interesting failure.”
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This piece of midsummer madness is undeniably silly and delusional, a dire political fable told as tongue-in-cheek pastiche.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Unlike most issue-oriented documentaries about the abundant idiocy of the human species and the imminent demise of our planet, Mark S. Hall's Sushi: The Global Catch offers foodies and sushi buffs a refreshing palate-cleanser before the parade of experts and the dire news reports.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    A cryptic and unsettling film.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Brian De Palma's Redacted doesn't quite work as a movie. But it works as SOMETHING.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    If it's a nonsensical patchwork quilt, it's mostly a watchable one.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    It remains a puzzling dream, vivid in detail and overly obvious in symbolism, fueled by half-digested lumps of malice and wonder.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Beckinsale tackles the downscale role manfully, but Rockwell is nearly unrecognizable as the pudgy, suicidally depressed, chronically inept Glenn, who's acting out a half-convincing portrayal of himself as a born-again Christian.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Lomborg has clearly been stung by the suggestion that he's a front man for know-nothingism, and Cool It is an agreeable and partly successful attempt to repair his image.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This film is never less than pleasant to spend time with, and that’s not a minor consideration when it comes to summer moviegoing.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    For me, the meticulous style, the fascination with ritualized (and ludicrous) violence and the film-geek self-referentiality all seem like markers of a film made by a young man, for other young men. If I were 23, and full to the brim with dark-hearted existentialism, I might love it too.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Arguably, A Girl Cut in Two is more fun around the edges, as an assemblage of bizarre supporting characters and throwaway comic bits, than it is down the middle, as a classic French morality tale.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is an ambling, relaxed talking-head docu in the grand European style.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    In its quest to create "wholesome" entertainment, the movie industry is furiously turning back the clock four decades or so, to the days when men were men, girls were cute but knew their place and pencil-necked Poindexters stayed out of your damn face.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    My eyes never left the screen and my attention never wandered; in a restricted, technical sense of the term, Kidnapped is a masterpiece. But I make no claims for its moral value or for any cathartic or redemptive qualities.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    A chaste, lively and mildly goofy romance to dispel the winter blahs.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Zbanic is such an acute observer of women's lives in their intimate details, and constructs such fine scenes, that I think this might be the best film to emerge from the aftermath of the Balkan conflict.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    A fever dream about an aging, grasping, neurotic artist who brings his disastrous personal life, thinly veiled, into his work and ends up as a grotesque caricature of himself, alienating everyone who ever loved him.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    There’s enough unfulfilled possibility in True Story to make it an intriguing introduction to this story of deception and self-deception, but the balance between true-crime cable soap and the darker, richer layers of Franco’s performance never quite adds up.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    At the risk of retreating into Waffle House aesthetic relativism, I think the unsettling power of Michael Winterbottom and Mat Whitecross' film stems from its contradictions.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    About midway through Denzel Washington's new film The Great Debaters comes a raw and terrifying scene that exemplifies why the movie's worth seeing, despite its hackneyed and awkward story.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    I never stopped being interested in The Place Beyond the Pines, and never stopped rooting for Cianfrance to make the hubristic ambition of his immense tripartite scheme pay off, even as it evidently falls apart.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Yes
    For the most part Yes buzzes with visual life and imagination.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    The Last Kiss is more a capable-craftsman film than a work of genuine dramatic insight, but here and there it opens a window onto the terror and wonder of grown-up life, one its characters don't especially want to look through.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    OK, so Valentine is, like, this new serial-killer movie that totally blows. But kind of in a good way. Like, it's funny.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    The funny thing about all this is that a half-hour into Underworld I couldn't wait for it to be over. When it really was over, I couldn't wait for the next installment. Go figure.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Greenwald isn't capable of the magisterial, mournful manner of, say, Eugene Jarecki's "Why We Fight," but the two films would make a natural double bill.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    An endless battle scene in search of a movie. It's every bit as harrowing -- and also every bit as pointless and misguided -- as the botched military mission it depicts.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    A sunny, cheerful, thoroughly artificial concoction, going nowhere with no particular speed. Still, better than your average airplane movie.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    An agreeably chewy, pulpy work of old-fashioned crime cinema, a fair bit overcooked and overlong, but worth catching for its acting, its atmosphere and its action set-pieces.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Haneke's new Funny Games has a current of bleak humor that comes through more clearly when you're not reading subtitles. It remains a horrifying, implacable mind-fuck, liable to be widely misunderstood and widely despised.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Many years in the making, Freida Lee Mock's documentary Wrestling With Angels paints an intimate and detailed portrait of playwright Tony Kushner, in the years since he became the most important living American dramatist. It's hard to avoid the conclusion that this is something of a booby prize.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Disney World, in this incoherent but often amazing work of American psychodrama, has a lot in common with the Overlook Hotel of “The Shining,” the Venice of “Death in Venice” and the booze-soaked Cuernavaca of “Under the Volcano.” It’s a zone of existential dread, the place where masculine dreams go to die, the place where the unburied ghosts of civilization rise up like Mouse-eared, three-fingered zombies and bite us in the ass.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    An engrossing, gem-hard little popcorn-cruncher.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    An alternately charming and frustrating comic entertainment.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    If Christensen's conventional plot is somewhat at odds with her downbeat realism, the idea that these characters are willing to fight like cats and dogs, and destroy each other and themselves, to avoid confronting their intense attraction to each other is totally convincing.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a tepidly amusing film that will offend no one, including those it claims to skewer.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    There's nothing unconventional or daring about On_Line, but considering how cheap it undoubtedly was to make, the acting, writing and direction all stand up pretty well; this is more intelligent and better structured than at least half the Hollywood movies I see.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Après Vous offers nice sound design and an unfussy presentation of middle-class Paris. It comes and goes with no unpleasant aftertaste.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Jurassic World unquestionably “delivers.” It feels like a hit; it offers a professionally crafted blend of blandness, predictability, watered-down cultural commentary and manufactured excitement.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    A lovely, faintly sinister travelogue.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Lee Harvey Oswald's guilt or innocence or accomplices are not the point of the film; Stone is more interested in the fact that much about the Kennedy murder is now so shrouded in myth and mystification as to be permanently unknowable, and that that fact alone has gnawed away at the self-confidence of middle-class white America ever since.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    The kind of little indie you'll either hate or find impossible to resist. I fall into the latter camp, but can appreciate opposing views.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    I think the movie is so restrained, and holds back so much on conventional plot and characterization, that its emotional impact is severely blunted. Nolte is excellent, I suppose, but we've seen this damaged-American-dude shtick from him before.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's essentially a mishmash of random ingredients, not very systematically presented and skewed to flatter its audience's presumed enlightenment.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    The pleasant surprise when you actually watch Insidious is that it turns out to be a moderately effective suburban-family creep show, majorly in debt to "Poltergeist" and "The Exorcist" and capturing at least a little of their spirit.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    It has, at times, a loopy, edgy humor and moments of genuinely affecting pathos. But somehow the combination doesn't add up to anything.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    It may be a haphazard mess, but it's actually pretty funny.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This third-act redemption raises Towelhead several notches, but it still ends up feeling like a well-acted and well-intentioned after-school special, a long way from the vividness and texture of Ball's television work.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    A bit pedantic, but thorough and interesting throughout, a must for history buffs.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    I enjoyed it immensely, flat-footed dialogue and implausible situations and all. Which doesn't stop me from believing that in its totality Secretariat is a work of creepy, half-hilarious master-race propaganda almost worthy of Leni Riefenstahl, and all the more effective because it presents as a family-friendly yarn about a nice lady and her horse.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Offers an intriguing, and profoundly frustrating, view of the New York underground hero whose 1962 erotic fantasy "Flaming Creatures" paved the way for Andy Warhol, John Waters, the "queer cinema" explosion and pretty much anybody who's ever made a movie starring his friends in weird Salvation Army outfits.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is going to be a notorious film that young audiences will be daring themselves to see, but it's actually funnier, darker and more troubling before it turns into a carnival of repeated dismemberment.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    The second movie by "Being John Malkovich" writer Charlie Kaufman is even weirder than his first.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's an ambitious, uneven, surprisingly talky melodrama.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Wild the movie has a curiously unsticky and unmemorable quality, as if it had melted along the journey, a Sierra Nevada snowball in the Mojave Desert. It has the same nearly invisible flaws as “Dallas Buyers Club,” Vallée’s last agreeable pop-anthropology fable of fall and redemption, but writ larger: It’s just that little bit prepackaged, it stands off from us a little too far. It wants us to feel, but not to feel anything dangerous.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Aided by witty and understated work from Baldwin and Stewart and the capable direction of Glatzer and Westmoreland, Moore does her utmost to pull Still Alice toward the realm of meaningful social drama. Let’s put it this way: It’s a way better movie than it ought to be, but not good enough to escape its pulpy, mendacious roots.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's literally difficult to believe that the person who made this picturesque, clueless, oddly misanthropic picture also made "Annie Hall" and "Crimes and Misdemeanors."
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Sometimes a story – a true story, a fictional one or a hybrid of the two – is sufficiently powerful and intriguing that it can break through the formula and packaging around it. Such is almost but not quite the case with The Theory of Everything.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    If I had the power to turn back time and start the tortuous production process that led to the “Hobbit” trilogy over again, with a different director in charge and a completely different approach, I would do it. But that’s precisely the problem with the One Ring, right? Once you put it on you are changed, and those changes cannot be undone.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Lee Daniels’ The Butler is big, brave, crude and contradictory, very bad in places and very good in others, and every American should see it.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This version of the Potter saga is fun and harmless rather than memorable or imaginative. That's certainly no crime.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    If a movie can be both exciting and boring at the same time, that movie would be Unstoppable an adrenaline-infused runaway-train flick that perfectly distills director Tony Scott's talents and limitations.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    You can choose to understand The Force Awakens as an embrace of the mythological tradition, in which the same stories recur over and over with minor variations. Or you can see it as the ultimate retreat into formula.... There are moments when it feels like both of those things, profound and cynical, deeply satisfying and oddly empty.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    The resulting film directed by Scott Hicks is afflicted by terminal nostalgic drift. You come out of the theater with nothing more specific than half-pleasant memories of baseball gloves, Ferris wheels and vintage automobiles. I've had naps that were more exciting.

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