Andrew O'Hehir

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For 1,473 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Andrew O'Hehir's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 Inside Job
Lowest review score: 0 Identity Thief
Score distribution:
1473 movie reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    It remains a puzzling dream, vivid in detail and overly obvious in symbolism, fueled by half-digested lumps of malice and wonder.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    The evident strengths and laudable intentions of Before the Devil Knows You're Dead (and even the appeal of Marisa Tomei in her undies) are overwhelmed by an implausible plot verging on unintentional comedy and a panoply of Noo Yawk dirt-bag supporting characters who might've seemed awkward on a 1993 episode of "NYPD Blue."
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    If Paranoid Park is mainly an accumulation of the signs and symbols and images inside Van Sant's own head, that's artistically legitimate. When he makes a feeble effort to connect Alex's plight to the Iraq war and the cultural climate of Bush-era America, I just don't buy it.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Not far below the surface Captain Phillips is also an unpleasant and uncomfortable experience, a film that’s not entirely happy with itself.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Amid the infoglut that surrounds us, Gibney's film feels too much like more noise. Is it telling the most important business story of our lifetimes, or is it just another fantastical yarn, crammed into the schedule after Scott and Laci Peterson, but before Charlemagne and the ancient Peruvian astronauts?
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    You can choose to understand The Force Awakens as an embrace of the mythological tradition, in which the same stories recur over and over with minor variations. Or you can see it as the ultimate retreat into formula.... There are moments when it feels like both of those things, profound and cynical, deeply satisfying and oddly empty.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    Any film that begins with one of those fake-news montages, where snippets of genuine CNN footage are stitched together to concoct a feeling of semi-urgency around its hackneyed apocalypse, already sucks even before it gets started.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    I felt like I'd been invited to a seven-course dinner, and all seven turned out to be cake – and then the host insisted on delivering a lecture about how cake would bring me closer to God.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    You may find yourself spellbound or colossally irritated; it's a close call either way.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    The whole experience of watching casts of talented and over-eager actors try to make sense of his (Allen) nonsensical scripts becomes increasingly strained and bizarre. I’ve felt that way about recent Allen movies I mostly enjoyed, like “Midnight in Paris” and “Vicky Cristina Barcelona,” and it goes double or triple for Blue Jasmine.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    I found the interlocking bitterness of Ayckbourn's play irritating and overly neat, and these people don't seem to belong to Paris or London or anywhere else, at least not anytime in the last 20 years.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Slowly but surely, Flight degenerates from a tale of moral paradox and wounded romance into a mid-1990s after-school special about addiction and recovery.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    For a while, at least, this one feels like Iñárritu’s masterpiece, until that familiar too-muchness begins to take over.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Wild the movie has a curiously unsticky and unmemorable quality, as if it had melted along the journey, a Sierra Nevada snowball in the Mojave Desert. It has the same nearly invisible flaws as “Dallas Buyers Club,” Vallée’s last agreeable pop-anthropology fable of fall and redemption, but writ larger: It’s just that little bit prepackaged, it stands off from us a little too far. It wants us to feel, but not to feel anything dangerous.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's an unholy mess, simultaneously too Gothic and too sarcastic, that preaches liberation and delivers only puritanism. It's a craftsmanlike but robotic imitation of "interesting" filmmaking, only in patches, and by accident, the real thing.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    I personally find the Russo brothers’ lightning-fast action scenes difficult to process — it’s as if cinema editing now exceeds the speed of human brain functions — but they’re undoubtedly exciting and skillfully constructed.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Trainwreck is not very good, but Schumer is frequently amazing in it. Officially, her fans will not be disappointed; not far below the surface, it’s a bummer.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    An endless battle scene in search of a movie. It's every bit as harrowing -- and also every bit as pointless and misguided -- as the botched military mission it depicts.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    For the most part "Inception" is a handsome, clever and grindingly self-serious boy-movie, shorn of imagination, libido, spirituality or emotional depth. Nolan establishes a fascinating world, loaded with trapdoors, symbols and hidden secrets, and then squanders the opportunity on an overpriced "Twilight Zone" episode.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    Given the debased standards of action cinema these days this might be enough to make The Town a hit. But almost everything else about the movie is badly off balance, starting with Affleck's decision to cast himself as the implacably sexy and good-hearted Doug.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Wag the Dog is such a crisply delivered political satire, so packed full of wickedly amusing details and expertly modulated performances and with its heart so obviously in the right place that I really, truly wish I could tell you it was also a good movie.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    To say that this undercover operation does not go well is an understatement, and the resulting portrait of the domestic anti-terrorism campaign, although it’s admittedly a portrait in miniature, could hardly be more disheartening.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's too convoluted by half, and turns what ought to be an idiosyncratic, delightful folktale-film into a baffling personal psychodrama with a nasty sting in its tale. Still, Breillat wouldn't be Breillat if she made movies that were easy to like, or to get your head around.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Although his (Eastwood's) intentions are good, he simply isn't capable of the wry, wistful blend of humor and sadness this story desperately needs.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Arguably, A Girl Cut in Two is more fun around the edges, as an assemblage of bizarre supporting characters and throwaway comic bits, than it is down the middle, as a classic French morality tale.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's almost a great war movie in one direction, and almost a piece of irredeemable cheese in the other, and there you have it.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Sometimes a story – a true story, a fictional one or a hybrid of the two – is sufficiently powerful and intriguing that it can break through the formula and packaging around it. Such is almost but not quite the case with The Theory of Everything.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Aided by witty and understated work from Baldwin and Stewart and the capable direction of Glatzer and Westmoreland, Moore does her utmost to pull Still Alice toward the realm of meaningful social drama. Let’s put it this way: It’s a way better movie than it ought to be, but not good enough to escape its pulpy, mendacious roots.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Offers an intriguing, and profoundly frustrating, view of the New York underground hero whose 1962 erotic fantasy "Flaming Creatures" paved the way for Andy Warhol, John Waters, the "queer cinema" explosion and pretty much anybody who's ever made a movie starring his friends in weird Salvation Army outfits.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    In the end The Silence is more like an intriguing work of misdirection than a great crime film, but it has a dreamlike and disturbing undertow you won’t soon forget, and Odar is unquestionably a director to watch.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    Mechanical plot that seems dull even before it laboriously clanks and screeches into motion.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Never quite establishes its own identity, and when you remember it in two years it's likely to be that movie you saw that you kind of liked with that girl in it, what's her name, from TV.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    I felt unable to decide between this movie is the most badass thing ever and OMG turn it off.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    22 Jump Street is the good-natured, sloppily rendered pile of balderdash for that moment, a movie that’s immune to all criticism and not worth bothering to dislike.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Humor is notoriously subjective, of course, but I didn't find Young Adult especially funny. It's an intermittently engaging fable of American homecoming that's both intentionally and unintentionally awkward, and flavored from bitter to sour all the way through.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    O'Connor chucks away everything that was interesting or dark or subtle in Warrior and replaces it with a pseudo-individualist, sub-Freudian, Tea Party-friendly fantasy.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Zbanic is such an acute observer of women's lives in their intimate details, and constructs such fine scenes, that I think this might be the best film to emerge from the aftermath of the Balkan conflict.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    I really don't understand why anybody thinks the wispy, bittersweet tale of long-distance love in Like Crazy is any big deal. Seriously, I liked this movie better last year, when it had Drew Barrymore in it and was called "Going the Distance."
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    The Walk is much less than the sum of its parts, except when the parts are so good you can’t ignore them.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's literally difficult to believe that the person who made this picturesque, clueless, oddly misanthropic picture also made "Annie Hall" and "Crimes and Misdemeanors."
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    A bit pedantic, but thorough and interesting throughout, a must for history buffs.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    If a movie can be both exciting and boring at the same time, that movie would be Unstoppable an adrenaline-infused runaway-train flick that perfectly distills director Tony Scott's talents and limitations.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    What I see in The Avengers, unfortunately, is a diminished film despite its huge scale, and kind of a bore.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    The hectic, sprawling Fanfan la Tulipe eventually feels like too much -- too many goofy asides, too much Comédie Française hambone acting, too much gallantry and villainy, too much forced good cheer.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Absolute Wilson changed my views of Wilson as a person tremendously, and at least gave me some useful context for his art.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    Almost utterly defeated by its subject's sardonic stonewalling.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    Mamet's trademark artificial, mutual-incomprehension dialogue and con-game plotting are ineptly matched to the action genre (and feel stale in any case), while the jiu-jitsu scenes are so incoherently shot and edited you can't tell if the fight choreography is any good or not.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    The Hunger Games has some cool moments here and there, and is never entirely dreadful. Lawrence is both radiant and triumphant. They haven't screwed it up badly enough to kill it, although they've tried.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    A relentlessly gruesome, visually impressive and ultimately not very interesting movie with some pretensions to seriousness.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    As a ninth-generation descendant of Abigail Faulkner, a convicted Salem witch who only escaped execution because she was pregnant at the time, I call down a terrible malediction upon the people who made this entertaining but indefensible movie.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    A tantalizing and beautiful picture made with tremendous integrity, and anchored by two marvelous performances, Isabel Coixet's The Secret Life of Words still, somehow, doesn't quite work.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    If Client 9 plays a lot like a murky, gripping political thriller, it lacks a fully satisfying ending -- or a fully satisfying hero.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Greenwald isn't capable of the magisterial, mournful manner of, say, Eugene Jarecki's "Why We Fight," but the two films would make a natural double bill.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    I never stopped being interested in The Place Beyond the Pines, and never stopped rooting for Cianfrance to make the hubristic ambition of his immense tripartite scheme pay off, even as it evidently falls apart.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    A sunny, cheerful, thoroughly artificial concoction, going nowhere with no particular speed. Still, better than your average airplane movie.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Just a string of ludicrous excuses to get from one outrageous comedy set-piece to the next.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's the film's reassuring, almost hypnotic visual rhythms, along with its Hollywood-like narrative structure -- which is closer to "Drumline" or "Bring It On" than to most documentaries -- that make it bearable.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Beckinsale tackles the downscale role manfully, but Rockwell is nearly unrecognizable as the pudgy, suicidally depressed, chronically inept Glenn, who's acting out a half-convincing portrayal of himself as a born-again Christian.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    I enjoyed the hell out of it for a while, but it got irritating and self-congratulatory long before it was over and I desperately do not want to see it again.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    So the rhetorical strategy of The Armstrong Lie is both a strength and a weakness. Gibney’s films have always been about truth, lies and power, but for the first time he finds himself in the ambiguous philosophical terrain of Errol Morris, exploring the lies we tell ourselves.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a meticulous nest of interlocking elements, not at all haphazard. But in its unrelieved bleakness and singularity of vision, it supplies very little in the way of conventional movieness.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    I suspect this guy can make a good movie if he learns the right lessons; he's made about half of one here. But the praise heaped upon A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints is way too much, way too soon.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's mediocre and half-baked, with flashes of a potential good movie showing through here and there.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    A limp and dreary experience, at least after you get past its intriguing premise. It's poorly written and woodenly acted, completely formulaic and hopelessly imprisoned by both its genre and finally its form.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    But imagination and energy are often not enough. On balance, this is the dumbest of the entries in Hollywood's anti-consumerist new wave.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    An alternately charming and frustrating comic entertainment.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Lee Daniels’ The Butler is big, brave, crude and contradictory, very bad in places and very good in others, and every American should see it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    There’s nothing disgraceful about The One I Love, and if you’re just in the mood for a VOD time-waster, you could do worse. But despite the agreeable lead performances, it doesn’t quite repay your 90 lost minutes of life.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It might be too slow and morbid for American viewers without an existing interest in the subject.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    About midway through Denzel Washington's new film The Great Debaters comes a raw and terrifying scene that exemplifies why the movie's worth seeing, despite its hackneyed and awkward story.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a tepidly amusing film that will offend no one, including those it claims to skewer.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    As to the question of whether Circumstance is actually a good film, or just one with an important story to tell, a high degree of difficulty and some hot all-girl action, I think the verdict is mixed.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It’s also true that toward the end of a big series the story eats the stars, and everybody in this movie, even Jennifer Lawrence as Katniss Everdeen, the Artemis-style revolutionary icon, is pretty much part of the furniture.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Made in Dagenham offers girl power in a can, lightly seasoned with swinging London and topped with cute-clumsy Sally Hawkins charming us to pieces. But the real women of Dagenham deserve better, and so do their sisters in the audience.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    I was startled to look up the running time and discover that X-Men: First Class is only 104 minutes; the second half is so clunky it feels much longer.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    An uneven but surprising movie, often outrageously funny and just as often completely flat.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Whatever we may make of van Gogh's life and death, Buscemi's talky, stagey Interview -- the first of three van Gogh adaptations planned by American actor-directors -- doesn't make much of a case for him as an important or original artist.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Van Damme's remarkable performance -- I say this in all seriousness -- comes pretty close to redeeming the picture's murky and overly complicated artistic intentions.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    For all its grandeur, Gladiator is a canned experience, a film that flails around awkwardly trying to find a reason to exist, or at least a compelling story to tell.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    If a movie can be fascinating and tedious at the same time, Inside Deep Throat -- which more or less depicts the America I have just described -- is that movie.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    At the risk of retreating into Waffle House aesthetic relativism, I think the unsettling power of Michael Winterbottom and Mat Whitecross' film stems from its contradictions.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Many years in the making, Freida Lee Mock's documentary Wrestling With Angels paints an intimate and detailed portrait of playwright Tony Kushner, in the years since he became the most important living American dramatist. It's hard to avoid the conclusion that this is something of a booby prize.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This version of the Potter saga is fun and harmless rather than memorable or imaginative. That's certainly no crime.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    A discombobulated summer movie that’s kind of fun but doesn’t have nearly enough story to fill up two hours.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Murray, as always, supplies any number of small, memorable moments — he ultimately relies on the same defanged sentimentality.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's kind of a mess. An agreeable, even lovable mess, but still a mess.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    This might have worked if the director and lead actress had the kind of intense mutual understanding that, say, Ingmar Bergman had with Liv Ullmann, or John Cassavetes had with Gena Rowlands.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    So some good acting and decent scares get entombed within too many dull postmodern iterations.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    A very mixed bag. It's an oddly dry fusion of documentary and narrative film that arguably doesn't quite click on either level.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Even as Sylvester Stallone's long goodbye to the heroic underdog who made him famous descends from pathos into silliness, and from fairy tale into hallucination, you can't help liking the big galoot.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    So subtle and subdued that it nearly undercuts itself. I'd describe it, in fact, as a film that doesn't quite work -- but the way it doesn't work is so distinctive and so interesting that it marks Jenkins as an exciting new face on the American indie scene.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    The film's intimacy never feels fake, it's sporadically and unpredictably funny (I didn't exactly enjoy the cacophonous trumpet duet of the "1812 Overture," but I won't soon forget it), and the nonprofessional cast is surprisingly good.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    I'd rate Bubble at no better than a C-plus for artistic achievement and a D-minus for audience appeal. In one sense, it accomplishes its goals efficiently by making you feel, in less than 80 minutes, as if you've gotten permanently trapped in the dead-end, trailer-park lives of its working-class characters. I've never been so grateful to get out of a theater, turn my cellphone back on and plug myself into a $4 Starbucks latte.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a glimpse into a world most secular, metropolitan liberals never see, and it's likely to induce howls of both terror and hilarity from big-city audiences.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This film is never less than pleasant to spend time with, and that’s not a minor consideration when it comes to summer moviegoing.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    I think the movie is so restrained, and holds back so much on conventional plot and characterization, that its emotional impact is severely blunted. Nolte is excellent, I suppose, but we've seen this damaged-American-dude shtick from him before.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Of course, the very existence of someone like Willmott -- a black university professor who can make an angry, ruthless satire about American racism with impunity -- suggests that we're still a long way from living in the CSA.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    5x2
    In the end I respected 5x2 more than I loved it. As we move backward in time, the distance between audience and characters inevitably widens -- we know what's going to happen and they don't -- and I found the effect a little astringent.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Lee Harvey Oswald's guilt or innocence or accomplices are not the point of the film; Stone is more interested in the fact that much about the Kennedy murder is now so shrouded in myth and mystification as to be permanently unknowable, and that that fact alone has gnawed away at the self-confidence of middle-class white America ever since.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This film is an inevitable product of our age, and enjoyable, right up to whatever your ickiness threshold is.

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