Andrew O'Hehir
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For 1,335 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Andrew O'Hehir's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Snowpiercer
Lowest review score: 0 Identity Thief
Score distribution:
1,335 movie reviews
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    I never stopped being interested in The Place Beyond the Pines, and never stopped rooting for Cianfrance to make the hubristic ambition of his immense tripartite scheme pay off, even as it evidently falls apart.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Rossi's film makes a compelling case on behalf of the traditional values of journalism.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Fratricide marks Arslan as one of Europe's hottest young talents, drawing simultaneously on the film traditions of America, Western Europe and the Middle East.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    A sunny, cheerful, thoroughly artificial concoction, going nowhere with no particular speed. Still, better than your average airplane movie.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    After this movie, the Beasties and their fans, camera-totin' or not, are left drenched, exhausted, delighted.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    A highly original and at times thrilling use of the documentary medium, and one of the most revealing films about the troubled nature of contemporary manhood I've ever seen.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Just a string of ludicrous excuses to get from one outrageous comedy set-piece to the next.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's the film's reassuring, almost hypnotic visual rhythms, along with its Hollywood-like narrative structure -- which is closer to "Drumline" or "Bring It On" than to most documentaries -- that make it bearable.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    There’s so much delusion and so much delight in Noah that I have trouble distinguishing one from the other, or determining whether its most outlandish flourishes qualify as mistakes or as strokes of genius.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Its characters and its nowheresville setting are uncannily realized... It's not a cartoon in any sense, but an honest-to-God movie with some fine, understated acting and a human heart.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Beckinsale tackles the downscale role manfully, but Rockwell is nearly unrecognizable as the pudgy, suicidally depressed, chronically inept Glenn, who's acting out a half-convincing portrayal of himself as a born-again Christian.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Robot & Frank is such a sly, dry, modest-seeming picture – part science fiction, part social satire, part geriatric comedy – that you don't realize how well it works until it's over.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Dark, hilarious and oddly moving.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Been Rich All My Life is something like the "Ballets Russes" of tap dancing. I'm delighted to report that the similarities include the fact that the Belles are transmitting their improvisatory "rhythm tap" style to generations of younger dancers.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    As long as Klapisch keeps his characters pinballing each other from one Euro-capital to the next, Russian Dolls remains fun and charming, without ever seeming remotely serious or meaningful.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    I enjoyed the hell out of it for a while, but it got irritating and self-congratulatory long before it was over and I desperately do not want to see it again.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Sound of My Voice has such creepy-crawly, brain-tickling energy that I wanted a much bigger payoff out of the final collision of all these people and episodes. Maybe they're saving that for the sequel.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Fahrenheit 9/11 is more like a drug experience than a political documentary. It's a mind-bending, half-digested mass of video clips, interviews, statistics, rampant speculation and the cheap gags Moore has never been able to resist.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Nearly as enjoyable as the original. Its not-so-secret weapon is the poised, calm performance of Yen, who somehow manages to play Ip as both character and archetype.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    So the rhetorical strategy of The Armstrong Lie is both a strength and a weakness. Gibney’s films have always been about truth, lies and power, but for the first time he finds himself in the ambiguous philosophical terrain of Errol Morris, exploring the lies we tell ourselves.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    A prodigious, almost spiritual experience, a luminous, challenging art movie out of the Tarkovsky school that happens to be about a real war and its effects on real children.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Delpy's writing is sharply observed and often hilarious, and her own performance as the perennially enraged Marion -- whom she says was inspired by Robert De Niro's Jake LaMotta in "Raging Bull" -- is one of her most memorable.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a meticulous nest of interlocking elements, not at all haphazard. But in its unrelieved bleakness and singularity of vision, it supplies very little in the way of conventional movieness.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Supremely economical, pulse-pounding and undeniably bewildering thriller, which plays like a blend of mid-'90s Hong Kong action flick and mid-'70s European crime drama. Arguably this movie amounts to less than the sum of its parts - but hot damn, those are some parts.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    I appreciated and admired the craftsmanship of Jellyfish more than I loved it, and I found its whimsical, magic-realist touches a bit cloying. Just as I began to appreciate that it had depths I hadn't perceived, it was over.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Lynch offers a fascinating view of Lynch's irascible personality (and insatiable appetite for coffee and cigarettes), and captures him discussing his formative years in Idaho and Philadelphia, as well as his 30-year involvement with Transcendental Meditation.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    An ingenious construction, much cleverer in psychological and symbolic terms than the story it tells, which mixes a schematic thriller and an on-the-nose fable about the corruption of American politics.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    The Hunger Games has some cool moments here and there, and is never entirely dreadful. Lawrence is both radiant and triumphant. They haven't screwed it up badly enough to kill it, although they've tried.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    I suspect this guy can make a good movie if he learns the right lessons; he's made about half of one here. But the praise heaped upon A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints is way too much, way too soon.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    If at first I tried to resist these hapless Pennsylvania teens who'd never even heard of David Bowie, for Christ's sake, I was won over completely by the time Patrick and Sam are ready to graduate and Charlie has faced down his demons one more time.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    The simplicity and profundity of that faith, and the unquestionable nobility of Judge's death, are well captured here.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    It leaves you with provocative questions and memorable images rather than neatly wrapped answers, and with that feeling of imprecise mystery I remember so well from my own youthful experiences: Something beautiful and evanescent just happened, or almost happened. But you can’t describe it, and if you try to seize it, it vanishes into sand and salt and sun.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's terrific! Shot by the brilliant cinematographer Anthony Dod Mantle ("Dogville," "28 Days Later," etc.) and anchored by amazing performances from identical (but not conjoined) twins Harry and Luke Treadaway, Brothers of the Head is not a freak show, or a knockoff "Rocky Horror" camp celebration. It's a work of powerful atmosphere and significant mystery. Plus, it rocks.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Damsels in Distress is deliberately and purposefully irrelevant; its irrelevance is its strength. It's zany-in-quotation-marks and also flat-out zany. I laughed until I cried, and you may too (if you don't find it pointless and teeth-grindingly irritating). Either way, Whit Stillman is back at last, bringing his peculiar brand of counterprogramming refreshment to our jaded age.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Scott Thomas' delicate, ferocious performance captures a woman quietly at war with herself, who begins to realize that her vision of respectability may not fit the remarkable young man in her care.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a funny, strange, sad and wonderful picture, packed with delightful performances by Hollywood stars and made by a director with a startling facility for the form and an expansive cinematic imagination.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Appreciate it instead as an exceedingly well-crafted fairy tale, alive with eccentric, overdrawn Dickensian characters and irresistibly wholehearted sentiment, and you'll enjoy perhaps the most accomplished and satisfying work of Brooks' career as a middlebrow entertainer.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew O'Hehir
    A fascinating, mature, beautifully crafted work of art, from a director who continues to surprise us. Sofia Coppola has absorbed the Italian avant-garde more completely than her father ever did, and has made a film about celebrity in the vein of Antonioni and Bertolucci, a film about Hollywood in which she turns her back on it, possibly forever.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Not among the most memorable works in this genre, but its deliberate lack of artifice and its stitched-together quality possess an undeniable power.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a fine example of the excellence of French genre film right now: A dark tale of revenge with an inscrutable heart, ice in its veins and an electric undercurrent of eroticism, it also might be the best-photographed picture I've seen so far this year.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's mediocre and half-baked, with flashes of a potential good movie showing through here and there.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Fast Five is a fantasy that in no way resembles real life; ordinary morality doesn't apply, and the audience knows that as well as the filmmakers do.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a magnificent miniature, a supremely tender work that's full of emotion and even sentimentality.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is another mini-triumph from the resurgent Irish film industry, but much more than that it's a resonant yarn of love, loss, loneliness -- and things that go bump in the night.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    There's no disputing the ingenuity and even the brilliance of this mind-bending mashup, which begins as a gritty recession-era marriage drama - the opening scene features a couple arguing about whether they have the money to get the Jacuzzi fixed - and then descends into ominous violence and finally total insanity.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    The damn thing is, Ridley very nearly makes this insuperable obstacle work to his benefit. He delivers a flawed, ambitious and deeply peculiar portrait of one of the 20th century’s most enigmatic musical talents, in the year before he ascended to rock-god status, that resembles no other pop-music biopic you’ve ever seen.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    There's way too much plot here getting in the way of the story, which makes it tough for Alfredson and cinematographer Peter Mokrosinski to focus on the series' strongest elements. Of course it's the character of Lisbeth that has made these books and movies into a worldwide phenomenon.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    If you can tolerate watching it once, it will burrow into your brain and never get out again; your only recourse will be dragging your friends into the nightmare and seeing it again.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    A potent and well-executed drama.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Unmistaken Child stands above most others in offering us an intimate look at Tibetan Buddhism in action, with no external commentary or narration.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Pedestrian but appealing.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A scared-straight after-school special, but actually good.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Pretty damned irresistible. What begins as a winning workout in a highly familiar genre -- the white-ethnic, big-city family comedy -- gradually gains both screwball momentum and emotional power, and delivers an unexpected punch by the time it reaches its climactic pileup of characters and revelations.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Frequently beautiful and intermittently haunting and could be called a meditation on aging and mortality, an intimate study of a peculiar variety of fame and a portrait of a genuinely remarkable person.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    A limp and dreary experience, at least after you get past its intriguing premise. It's poorly written and woodenly acted, completely formulaic and hopelessly imprisoned by both its genre and finally its form.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's both a supremely controlled exercise in form and tone and an intriguing exploration of the ways new technology intersects with age-old questions of dominance, control and individuality, particularly in the school setting.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    The film has moments of real brilliance and pathos; flawed as it is, Seven Psychopaths isn't like anything else you'll see this year, or any other.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Not for the first time in his career, Soderbergh has made a mainstream film that is simultaneously a thought experiment.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A subtle, underplayed psychological drama with terrific work by all three actors.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a sweet, lively and funny movie rather than a fully realized one, but it makes clear that Gordon-Levitt has a natural feeling for cinema and should do more of it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Although I have mixed feelings about The Eye, there's no question the Pangs have a natural talent for cinema. They create bright, unfussy images and work terrifically with actors.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    But imagination and energy are often not enough. On balance, this is the dumbest of the entries in Hollywood's anti-consumerist new wave.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    An alternately charming and frustrating comic entertainment.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    While excellent in many technical respects, is a muted, pretty, anesthetic concoction that's never fully satisfying.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Trapero makes naturalistic films with plenty of sex, violence and dark humor; in Carancho you can see the influence of 1950s film noir, the ballsy renegades of 1970s American cinema (especially early Martin Scorsese) and a little touch of the Coen brothers.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    The wonder of Sherrybaby is that we can admire Sherry's exuberance and evident love of life -- and the extraordinary actress who portrays her -- without really being sure where she's going.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    An oddly graceful combination of fairy tale and romantic comedy, set in a forgotten corner of the world.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Captain America is exactly what the third week of July needed: a curiously fun, surprisingly imaginative and unashamedly old-fashioned yarn of skulduggery and adventure.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is not one of those Eisenhower-Little Rock moments where you get to feel warm and fuzzy about the power of the state being on the right side of history.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    An impressive but exceptionally disturbing feature debut from Australian director Justin Kurzel that pushes the new wave of Aussie crime films up a notch.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a rip-snorting, barrel-riding adventure movie — perfect for all ages, as they say (though it isn’t for very young kids) — loaded with fast-paced fight scenes, great-looking effects and enjoyable and/or scurrilous supporting characters.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Lee Daniels’ The Butler is big, brave, crude and contradictory, very bad in places and very good in others, and every American should see it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    If you're willing to take this voyage with Fiennes into the psychic landscape and working life of one of the world's greatest contemporary artists, it's a trip you'll never forget.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Horror fans will celebrate Stake Land, and future horror-film directors should go to school on it. The flame is still burning -- and it keeps the undead away, at least for a while.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    An engaging, well-made docu that admirably captures the singular importance of its subject.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Dark, sleek, funny and creepily infectious, the genetic-engineering horror-comedy Splice is a dynamic comeback vehicle for Canadian genre director Vincenzo Natali, who made a splash a few years ago with "Cube."
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Following four players through the first season of Miller's regime, Browne captures not just a high-energy sports spectacle played out in the bowling megaplexes of outer suburbia but, even more interestingly, a clash of cultures between bowling's hallowed past and its possible future.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Pretty good summer flick!
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    The movie is a hilarious, riveting must-see about a family as it breaks down almost all the way and then reinvents itself.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Aladag's point, I think, is that no matter how righteous we may feel about this kind of zero-sum cultural collision, for the human beings involved it often results in unbearable tragedy.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Hope Springs is an oddly ambitious blend of bland humor and startling insight into the realities of married life. It's something like Ingmar Bergman's "Scenes From a Marriage," as translated into the universe of the Lifetime Network.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Soderbergh's film is probably not the equal of either Tarkovsky's 1972 predecessor or the memorably Byzantine prose of Lem's novel, but in the end, almost despite himself, this able craftsman has made a brave and lovely companion piece to both of them. His ending is pure cinema at its most marvelous and moving.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Not a major Herzog work or one that will draw a large audience, but a must-see for those who suspect (as I do) that he's one of the greatest talents now working in this medium.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    A remarkably evenhanded story about an eager young activist who was drawn down a slippery slope toward property destruction and violence, and who wound up as a baffled defendant in a widely publicized federal terrorism case.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a conventional political documentary with a conventional view of what happened in the Buckeye State and why, but it's no less fascinating for all that.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It might be too slow and morbid for American viewers without an existing interest in the subject.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    There’s nothing disgraceful about The One I Love, and if you’re just in the mood for a VOD time-waster, you could do worse. But despite the agreeable lead performances, it doesn’t quite repay your 90 lost minutes of life.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Terrifically acted, reassuringly formulaic, and moderately amusing.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Lovett's film is a finely balanced and loving work of history, which never tries to sugarcoat elements of the explosion of gay sexuality three decades ago that may seem excessive or disturbing to some contemporary viewers.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    About midway through Denzel Washington's new film The Great Debaters comes a raw and terrifying scene that exemplifies why the movie's worth seeing, despite its hackneyed and awkward story.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Is it, on some level, '70s-style horror schlock dressed up with contemporary gimmicks? Sure, but don't act like that's a bad thing! It's schlock with honor, schlock with a conscience, schlock that speaks to the way we live now.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    I wish one-tenth of the films I saw were made with this much craft and integrity, this much intuitive understanding of where to put the camera, how much of the story to explain in words (not much) and how much to trust his outstanding cast to carry the film with their voices, faces and bodies.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a tantalizing case study that suggests ordinary people still have the power to steer a course between faceless bureaucracies and greedy capitalists, but only just - and only if they can find a way to overcome their differences and work together.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a tepidly amusing film that will offend no one, including those it claims to skewer.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    The universe of The Dead Girl is an almost uniformly dreary one, whose women are all either dowdy or whorish.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    As to the question of whether Circumstance is actually a good film, or just one with an important story to tell, a high degree of difficulty and some hot all-girl action, I think the verdict is mixed.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    This movie may not have the highest production values you've ever seen, but it's the work of an artist, one whose view of America, history and the awkwardness of human life is generous and deep.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Gerardo Naranjo's deliriously trashy Drama/Mex may not do much to burnish the international prestige of Mexican cinema, but it's an entertaining blend of obvious influences, from softcore cable-TV porn to Tarantino to "Less Than Zero" and "Leaving Las Vegas."
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    My Week With Marilyn is the kind of shtick-laden movie in the British TV mode that delivers all its laughs, and all its grand, declamatory moments, right on schedule. I'm delighted to recommend it, as long as you know what you're in for: "The King's Speech" has the subtlety of Chekhov in comparison.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Brash, bristling, highly watchable film.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's enough to make you forgive a great deal of this film's dumbness and appreciate it as meaningless, goodhearted and mostly non-obnoxious entertainment.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Largely improvised, cast with ex-Marines and Iraqi refugees and shot in Jordan. It might just be the movie this war has been waiting for.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a daring, audacious and sometimes terrifying movie -- purely as a thrill ride, it's probably the summer's best offering so far. That doesn't mean it left me feeling entirely satisfied. There's an emptiness at the soul of Salt -- again, meaning both the movie and the character -- that's extremely disturbing, maybe on purpose.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Carrey provides one of his most whacked-out and enjoyable performances.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's refreshingly honest, depicts the kinds of American lives not often seen on-screen and shows us a familiar star in a striking new light.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It’s a highly enjoyable picture.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Made in Dagenham offers girl power in a can, lightly seasoned with swinging London and topped with cute-clumsy Sally Hawkins charming us to pieces. But the real women of Dagenham deserve better, and so do their sisters in the audience.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    I was startled to look up the running time and discover that X-Men: First Class is only 104 minutes; the second half is so clunky it feels much longer.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Arias' blend of traditional cell animation and 3-D CGI effects is thoroughly mind-blowing, and the film's visual sensibility is utterly distinctive.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Another strong journalistic-style film, this one exposes how unbelievably rapacious the financial industries have become in extending credit to unlikely prospects -- among them college students, nursing-home residents, small children, dogs and dead people.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Undeniably clever.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A movie where style and craft are fatally confused with substance, and where almost no effort is made to make the characters seem like believable people.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    An electrically paced and brilliantly acted death-row thriller.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Dismissed in some quarters as trash because it depicts a sexual act (of sorts) between two teenage girls, Water Lilies struck me instead as a hypnotic and wholly convincing look at teen culture from the inside, with all its courage, cruelty and unspoken codes of silence intact.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    An uneven but surprising movie, often outrageously funny and just as often completely flat.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    It demands to be experienced on its own terms or not at all, which creates a significant level of resistance in the contemporary media marketplace – but may also be a source of counterintuitive appeal.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Certainly it isn't the greatest of Coppola's pictures, or even of his independent productions, but those are pretty high standards. It has a verve and vitality that's been missing from his pictures for 25 years, and its various and visible flaws all result from too much of that verve rather than too little. I enjoyed it tremendously.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    I really enjoyed watching Prometheus almost the whole way through, and I'm looking forward to seeing it again. It's an enjoyable thrill ride, slicked up with a thin veneer of Asking the Big Questions. But do its so-called heroes really have to be such blithering New Age idiots?
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Hanna is almost a terrific movie, or a partly terrific one, but all its giddy, improvised wonder resolves into nothing more than a ruthless, symmetrical story about a murderous monster.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    If it's all reasonably familiar indie-comedy terrain, it's delivered at a brisk, economical clip with plenty of laughs, and a series of running gags that keep getting funnier.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    The seventh and last volume in J.K. Rowling's series of best-selling fantasy novels has been split in half for Hollywood purposes, making this long, dour, impressive and handsome motion picture the penultimate chapter, largely designed to build up the heavy-duty suspense before the climax is delivered next year.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    After the fundamental problem of Coherence has become clear, or clear-ish – there’s another dinner party, at that other house, that looks an awful lot like this one – the movie becomes slightly too much like an unfolding mathematical puzzle, although an ingenious one that reaches a chilling conclusion.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    I won't argue for the cinematic virtues of this film; they don't exist. But as a pseudo-documentary portrait of real life behind the explosive headlines, it's absorbing.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    If The Way is sometimes shaggy and inelegant, and flirts with sentimentality the whole way through, I was finally overcome by its dignity and sincerity, and by the rough, rude, gorgeous magic of its journey.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Whatever we may make of van Gogh's life and death, Buscemi's talky, stagey Interview -- the first of three van Gogh adaptations planned by American actor-directors -- doesn't make much of a case for him as an important or original artist.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a noisy, chaotic, technology-crazed 21st-century action film, but also one made with tremendous excitement, vigor and heart, along with a myriad of wonderful details.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    By conducting her conversations in public spaces, and removing her interlocutors from desks and offices and book-lined studies and other appurtenances of intellectual authority, Taylor introduces a degree of playfulness and unpredictability that becomes the movie's M.O.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Van Damme's remarkable performance -- I say this in all seriousness -- comes pretty close to redeeming the picture's murky and overly complicated artistic intentions.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A moving and profoundly upsetting portrait of life near the bottom of the global power pyramid.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a lovely film directed with delicacy and taste, profoundly alive to the rhythms of its actors and characters, which gives its superlative British cast of stage and screen legends the time and space they deserve.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Candela Peña is sensational in the leading role, and the film is big-hearted, poetic, sweet, sad and romantic.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Murray, as always, supplies any number of small, memorable moments — he ultimately relies on the same defanged sentimentality.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Avenue Montaigne, is a delicious French pastry, tart and sweet, steeped in Parisian glamour.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Che
    I was never bored, in four hours-plus. Whether or not it ends up becoming a great film (or films), this is miles and miles beyond anything I thought Soderbergh could create from this material.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's by far the funniest and warmest movie Araki has ever made, with much less juvenile angst and much more command of his craft.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    So ingeniously constructed that these meta-noir ingredients feel dizzyingly enjoyable, never hackneyed. In fact, the overheated melodrama of Identity is crucial to its method -- and the key, in some ways, to its narrative secrets.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    For all its grandeur, Gladiator is a canned experience, a film that flails around awkwardly trying to find a reason to exist, or at least a compelling story to tell.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a deliberately chilly and nerve-wracking experience, and one of the bleakest portraits of American society seen on-screen in the last several decades.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Schizo is in its way a taut and exciting thriller.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    The Dancer Upstairs, is a haunting and often beautiful work, part doomed romance and part political thriller, that demonstrates the adult command of the medium Malkovich has always demonstrated as an actor.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    If a movie can be fascinating and tedious at the same time, Inside Deep Throat -- which more or less depicts the America I have just described -- is that movie.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Like Ayer’s cop flicks, Fury is a gripping ride all the way through, if somewhat restricted in its emotional and visual range.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    At the risk of retreating into Waffle House aesthetic relativism, I think the unsettling power of Michael Winterbottom and Mat Whitecross' film stems from its contradictions.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    What's clear from the film is that there's a massive, almost tribal demand for O'Brien's brand of slightly more upscale comedy (maybe less so for his rock-star stylings), and also that being that famous doesn't do wonders for anyone's personality.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    The story of how La Sierra moves from a seemingly pointless war to an unexpected peace is a thrilling one, although the impact of seeing what becomes of these three kids is devastating.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Sheds some unexpected light on the uneven and still undigested career of one of the most paradoxical artists pop culture has yet produced.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Many years in the making, Freida Lee Mock's documentary Wrestling With Angels paints an intimate and detailed portrait of playwright Tony Kushner, in the years since he became the most important living American dramatist. It's hard to avoid the conclusion that this is something of a booby prize.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Offers an introduction to the lean-and-mean, social-realist Romanian storytelling style that's built around a charismatic young actor and a familiar genre.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This version of the Potter saga is fun and harmless rather than memorable or imaginative. That's certainly no crime.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a deeply flawed film but also an important one.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    One of the strangest and least summarizable motion pictures ever made: tragic and hilarious, tightly constructed and miscellaneous.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    A distinctively absorbing entertainment, offering just enough popcorn thrills for mass audiences and just enough chewiness for hardcore sci-fi fans.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's kind of a mess. An agreeable, even lovable mess, but still a mess.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a mixed bag with plenty of gags that fall flat, not a comic masterpiece. But it's got tremendous zing, a sense of mischief and a big heart, more than enough to mark it as a delicious shot of caffeinated ice cream, and the summer season's funniest comedy.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Outsiders will find this schtick-laden, mildly exciting adventure yarn an inoffensive triviality, while fans will savor one more encounter with Picard, Riker, Data, Worf and the gang, replete with all the well-worn character tics and platitudinous parables about the contemporary world they expect.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Profane, hilarious and ultimately heartbreaking, Alex Holdridge's black-and-white feature In Search of a Midnight Kiss has a gutter purity that makes you root for it all the way and forgive its patches of ultra-indie awkwardness.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Lymelife offers charm and humor through its young central characters and pathos through its remarkable supporting cast, without pulling punches on its overall atmosphere of autumnal darkness and anomie.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Paine seems delighted to root for all three companies and essentially declares a three-way tie, which may be fine for the moment.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    This might have worked if the director and lead actress had the kind of intense mutual understanding that, say, Ingmar Bergman had with Liv Ullmann, or John Cassavetes had with Gena Rowlands.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    However you slice it, Monsters is a dynamite little film, loaded with atmosphere, intelligence, beauty and courage.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    This bloody celebration finally gives the American Revolution the epic it deserves.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's rare enough to see a Hollywood movie made with this much attention and personality, let alone one that balances comedy and darkness as well as this one does.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Despite all that South American sunshine, this lean and brilliantly constructed thriller is a dark realm of secrets and lies, illuminated by TV lighting and the glitter of John Leguizamo's eyes. Those in search of life-affirming family entertainment might want to stick with Ingmar Bergman.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    The film's strange blend of tragedy and surreal gore, à la Dario Argento and Lucio Fulci, is surprisingly effective. For the right person, and you know who you are, this one's a must-see.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Does this crazy idea work? Maybe 70 percent of the time, but when it does it's both daring and brilliant.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    On the whole, Friends With Benefits is a rewarding summer diversion, albeit one that's fatally torn between what it wants to be -- riotous, anarchic and anti-moralistic -- and the disappointing wet-blanket formula it reverts to in the end.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Much of the picture is exciting and terrifying.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    So some good acting and decent scares get entombed within too many dull postmodern iterations.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    A very mixed bag. It's an oddly dry fusion of documentary and narrative film that arguably doesn't quite click on either level.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    At its best the film is blissfully, anarchically funny, and director Steve Pink keeps the pace crackling.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Zoo
    Quiet, sensitive, resolutely unsensational documentary about virtually the most sensational subject you can imagine.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Even as Sylvester Stallone's long goodbye to the heroic underdog who made him famous descends from pathos into silliness, and from fairy tale into hallucination, you can't help liking the big galoot.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    One of the best films of the year.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Arguably a more important movie, which more clearly lays out what must be done to save the world, and how we can begin.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Can I tell you exactly what happens in Memphis, or what it’s “about”? Absolutely not. But it worked its magic on me, and its meaning is something I take on faith.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 30 Andrew O'Hehir
    Fitzgerald’s influence could have crept in there by osmosis, and whatever other charges you want to level against Spring Breakers – such as incoherence, plotlessness, salaciousness and mind-numbing monotony – it has no lack of high concept.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Thrumming with anguish and erotic vitality, Eden paints a heartbreaking portrait of a newly affluent country (freed from dour priests, whiskey-soaked revolutionaries and shawl-clad women) afflicted with emotional growing pains.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    So subtle and subdued that it nearly undercuts itself. I'd describe it, in fact, as a film that doesn't quite work -- but the way it doesn't work is so distinctive and so interesting that it marks Jenkins as an exciting new face on the American indie scene.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A genuinely exciting thrill ride that only occasionally feels bloated or painfully dumb.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    The film's intimacy never feels fake, it's sporadically and unpredictably funny (I didn't exactly enjoy the cacophonous trumpet duet of the "1812 Overture," but I won't soon forget it), and the nonprofessional cast is surprisingly good.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Le Besco gives an unforgettable performance in a movie that's sweet and sad, formally near-perfect but never cynical.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Beneath its movie star clowning, its awful-but-relatable heroine and its lightweight gags, Burn After Reading poses an implicit challenge to its viewers: Can you figure out why this comedy isn't very funny? Could that be because its central proposition is that the people in the theater are just as stupid, just as gullible, just as eager to be deceived as the people on the screen?
    • 63 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Inevitably a little patchier and less startlingly original than its predecessor -- S2 is an ingenious, often hilarious, movie that does nothing to diminish the well-deserved cult reputation of its director.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 30 Andrew O'Hehir
    Scorsese is pushing, I guess, for something that combines a '40s horror-thriller with a contemporary psychological tragedy. What he ends up with is more like a Hardy Boys mystery directed by David Lynch.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    I'd rate Bubble at no better than a C-plus for artistic achievement and a D-minus for audience appeal. In one sense, it accomplishes its goals efficiently by making you feel, in less than 80 minutes, as if you've gotten permanently trapped in the dead-end, trailer-park lives of its working-class characters. I've never been so grateful to get out of a theater, turn my cellphone back on and plug myself into a $4 Starbucks latte.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's entirely sincere and genuinely not terrible. Burns knows the milieu of his suburbanized New York Irish-American characters at a bone-deep level (enough to induce powerful flashbacks in someone of my background), and the tone of regretful, tragicomic, low-key melodrama he strikes is just right.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    As far as bored and cynical, playing-out-the-string comic-book action sequels go – hey, Iron Man 3 is a pretty good one!
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A delightfully off-kilter love story. I don't want to oversell this winsome little movie, but if you want a bittersweet but cheerful pick-me-up on a cold winter evening, it's just the ticket.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a glimpse into a world most secular, metropolitan liberals never see, and it's likely to induce howls of both terror and hilarity from big-city audiences.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Simultaneously dark and sweet, always a difficult combination to pull off. It views its characters with both archness and affection, and even as it lovingly recalls films of another era it insists that the painful awkwardness of youth is perennial.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Friedkin's still got it - the "it" being his ability to infuse every frame of the film with powerful ambiguity and doubt, and also his ability to attract terrific actors and propel them in unexpected directions.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Jolly good fun.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This film is never less than pleasant to spend time with, and that’s not a minor consideration when it comes to summer moviegoing.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 30 Andrew O'Hehir
    There's so little sexual chemistry between the actors in this film that it seems like a kind of accomplishment. I've seen shows on C-SPAN that were hotter than this.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    I’m saying that King has fearlessly forged into unexplored territory — that being the African-American stoner comedy, with an adult audience in view – and the results are profoundly hilarious, occasionally heartbreaking, often brilliant and entirely devoid of political piety.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    This delicious little period piece from Spanish writer-director Pablo Berger is like one of those really expensive chocolates, where you start out expecting a brief sugar buzz and end up surprised by the sophistication and delicacy of the flavor.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Director Michel Hazanavicius captures the jet-age atmosphere, form-fitting wardrobes, jazz-ethnic soundtrack and bouffant hairdos of JFK/de Gaulle-era espionage films in perfect detail, but it's Dujardin's performance as the suave, confident and utterly clueless Hubert Bonisseur de la Bath (to Francophones, a name that drips with phony aristocratic pretension) that gives "OSS 117" its edge.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    I found the film powerfully erotic, although it has minimal nudity and no explicit sex.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    If Land of Plenty isn't always elegant, it has the inexpressible aura of mystery and wonder that exemplifies his best work. Fans will feel echoes of both "Paris, Texas" and "The State of Things" here. Like those movies, this one is less an angry critique than a sad meditation on the American dream, something Wim Wenders understands well and has never been able to resist.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    I think the movie is so restrained, and holds back so much on conventional plot and characterization, that its emotional impact is severely blunted. Nolte is excellent, I suppose, but we've seen this damaged-American-dude shtick from him before.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Captures the awful intimacy and the grimy, second-rate quality of the Northern Ireland conflict in resonant fashion.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Of course, the very existence of someone like Willmott -- a black university professor who can make an angry, ruthless satire about American racism with impunity -- suggests that we're still a long way from living in the CSA.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    May not be entirely original or entirely successful, but it's definitely fun to watch.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    I found The Matrix Reloaded so exhilarating. It's a sadder, wiser, more grown-up movie than its predecessor. It was made, one might almost say, for a sadder, wiser, more grown-up world.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Ted
    In a universe of Hollywood comedies that seem determined to insult the audience and pander to the basest form of post-adolescent fantasy, Ted feels almost sophisticated.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Baghead is a kick in the pants.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    5x2
    In the end I respected 5x2 more than I loved it. As we move backward in time, the distance between audience and characters inevitably widens -- we know what's going to happen and they don't -- and I found the effect a little astringent.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Something of a gigantic goof, perpetrated by Penn and Herzog -- and the goofees included much of the entertainment media, people in the film business, the Scottish authorities and (I think) even some of the film's cast.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Centurion has its moments of manly cornpone camaraderie and certainly isn't blazingly original, but it offers riveting storytelling, gorgeous cinematography and scenery, loads of gore, and a politically complicated history lesson.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    The Help definitely worked on me as a consummate tear-jerker with a terrific cast, and it's pretty much the summer's only decent Hollywood drama.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Thoroughly wonderful.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Lee Harvey Oswald's guilt or innocence or accomplices are not the point of the film; Stone is more interested in the fact that much about the Kennedy murder is now so shrouded in myth and mystification as to be permanently unknowable, and that that fact alone has gnawed away at the self-confidence of middle-class white America ever since.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This film is an inevitable product of our age, and enjoyable, right up to whatever your ickiness threshold is.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    Matsumoto isn't the first Japanese director to go all meta on the superhero tradition (consider also Takashi Miike's 2004 "Zebraman"), but this work of improbable lunacy may well max out the genre.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a movie of tremendous visual daring, magnificent special-effects work and surprising moral gravity.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Despite his reliance on visual cliché, Trajkov mines a rich vein of morbid Slavic comedy, and his young characters have an appetite for adventure that's thoroughly unfake.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Utterly delightful.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    If it's too subtle (and too similar to several other low-key indie romcoms) to make a big splash, it's got lovely performances and really builds strength as it goes along.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Lots of movies about the Middle Ages can do the mud and blood -- though we sure see a lot of both here -- but in this movie it's like Refn has ripped you out of time and dropped you there.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    There are a number of terrific production numbers in Lucy, basically violent action scenes that border on slapstick, and as long as we agree in advance that the “science” in this movie goes beyond pseudo into total B.S., I believe you will leave satisfied.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    I simultaneously want to endorse its ambition and nerve and report that it's a very mixed bag.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    These people can behave well or poorly, but they were already bugs on the windshield of life before their unhappy collision.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's hilarious, and contains some of Mamet's best dialogue. And that somehow, by making a racist, murderous, Everycreep his protagonist, Mamet is able to produce some of his most penetrating psychological and spiritual insights.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Conveys an intense sculptural loveliness with something moving beneath it, maybe a sense of menace. And it's leavened, like once per hour, with a teeny dash of humor. This isn't nearly as immediately likable or showy as "Cremaster 3," but in a quiet way just as spectacular.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    The morbid and gripping war film Blessed by Fire, from the Argentine filmmaker Tristán Bauer, is well worth a look.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Ultimately, though, it's a little schizo, like a depressed dude in a clown suit, or a Theodore Dreiser novel hopped up on not enough happy pills.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    His final scenes with Lucy and with his own dad are both surprising and shattering, and I was left humbled by the film's honesty.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    You're just sitting there, somewhere between mildly amused and fairly bored, watching the filmmakers squander Hollywood's most eccentric character actor and a lot of very fine specimens of the order Rodentia.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Completely deranged, and the portrait it paints of our beloved country depicts a dangerous place full of neurotics and obsessives. But lots of fun, with porn, booze, backyard barbecues and elaborate revenge schemes!
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is the kind of movie where most people know what they want and are pretty sure what they will get, that being “more of the same, please.”
    • 61 Metascore
    • 30 Andrew O'Hehir
    Rarely has a film with such a great cast and so many moments of terrific writing and such high dramatic goals been so messy and disorganized and fundamentally bad.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Lomborg has clearly been stung by the suggestion that he's a front man for know-nothingism, and Cool It is an agreeable and partly successful attempt to repair his image.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Despite its schizophrenic nature and often disagreeable characteristics, Broken English has flashes of something. You might say it has an integrity of purpose, if not of execution.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Above all a cracking good yarn that earns its laughter, its wonder and its tears.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    A fever dream about an aging, grasping, neurotic artist who brings his disastrous personal life, thinly veiled, into his work and ends up as a grotesque caricature of himself, alienating everyone who ever loved him.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is definitely a formula movie, lovingly and even obsessively so, made by someone who obviously enjoyed “American Pie” and numerous other raunchy-sweet teen sex comedies of the ’90s, and wished they existed for girls.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Full of imaginative, outrageous and egregiously insulting 3-D gags.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    I enjoyed it immensely, flat-footed dialogue and implausible situations and all. Which doesn't stop me from believing that in its totality Secretariat is a work of creepy, half-hilarious master-race propaganda almost worthy of Leni Riefenstahl, and all the more effective because it presents as a family-friendly yarn about a nice lady and her horse.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    An important human and artistic testament -- a calm meditation on something no one can consider calmly.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    For me, the meticulous style, the fascination with ritualized (and ludicrous) violence and the film-geek self-referentiality all seem like markers of a film made by a young man, for other young men. If I were 23, and full to the brim with dark-hearted existentialism, I might love it too.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    While Keating's agenda is clearly hostile, and Giuliani's political committee is eagerly trying to do counter-propaganda, this isn't a campaign of character assassination or innuendo, but rather a dutifully constructed biographical film about a tremendously skilled prosecutor and politician.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    What results is a patchy, uncertain motion picture, full of incidents and images but fundamentally unfocused and superficial.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Stephen King reportedly loathed the liberties Kubrick and co-writer Diane Johnson took with his story, but King's ur-villain, the emasculated husband from hell, has never been more clearly presented on-screen.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a performance of great subtlety, not a caustic caricature: Rat (Cusack) still believes in something, probably still in some Platonic ideal of poetic possibility.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Seeing these four actors launching Reza's zingers at each other at high speed is pretty much worth the price of admission all by itself, and one thing you always know about Polanski is that he won't waste your time.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Despite the lurid content, this is a beautifully made film that reaches for moral seriousness and resists facile judgments.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A lean, clean killing machine that supplies some dark, late-summer thrills and chills and breathes new life into a seemingly extinct franchise.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    If Elysium isn’t the post-millennial sci-fi masterpiece I was hoping for, it has tremendous resonance and is pretty doggone good for its category.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Gandini makes it seem as if the nation of Dante and Fellini has been conquered by "Girls Gone Wild." As hyperbolic cases go, that's a pretty delicious one, but it's not quite true yet.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    The good news is that Alfredson finds his footing in The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest and delivers a rousing, grueling, almost operatically scaled finale to the series.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Perhaps understandably, these artifacts of a vastly different ideological and economic era -- have become kitsch objects, the focus of a half-horrified nostalgia, in the midst of the feverish Chinese boom.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Taken on its own terms The Wolverine is the cleanest, least pretentious and most satisfying superhero movie of the summer.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    But if the storytelling is murky, the filmmaking is stunning and, more important, the passion for this city -- its people and landscape -- is pure.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a warm, intelligent and highly contemporary comedy with just the right amount of edge, a terrific ensemble cast and a big, fuzzy golden retriever ready to knock you down and lick you like a giant lollipop.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    9
    Actually, the problem with wunderkind director Shane Acker's "stitchpunk" animated fantasy 9 isn't so much that it bears a sped-up, dumbed-down resemblance to "The Lord of the Rings," although it does. It's more that Acker's dark and whimsical creation, so clearly in the tradition of his mentor Tim Burton, is wondrous to behold but offers only an indifferent and generic mishmash of quest fantasy and post-apocalyptic science fiction when it comes to story.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Masterfully paced and constructed, and the performances are memorable.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    This film stands as an intimate, terrifying document that renders an incomprehensible slice of recent history in human terms.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Reconstruction has a poetic sensibility, as well as an old-fashioned Continental appetite for romance, that makes it distinctive.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Nolfi's dialogue is lean and often funny, while Damon and Blunt play appealing and clearly delineated characters drawn together by the kind of old-fashioned romantic passion you don't often see in contemporary movies.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 30 Andrew O'Hehir
    Edward Norton's dopey directorial debut gives interfaith romance a bad name.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    There's a vivid comedy to this family's emotional state of siege, an easy confidence to Honoré's camerawork, and plenty of beautiful bodies.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    For me the breakthrough in At Any Price comes from 59-year-old Dennis Quaid, cementing his character-actor renaissance with what may be the nastiest role of his career.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    What is the point of making a movie that’s just like the dopiest, broadest and most reductive grade of guy-oriented comedy, except with women?
    • 60 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    A masterful accomplishment...teems with its own sense of life, crackles with daring, walks the tightrope between satire and pathos with a rare assuredness.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It’s an enormous relief to have a lightweight but non-insulting date movie to recommend in this arid season. This isn’t a movie that requires your full attention at every second – although when Dyrholm and Brosnan are on-screen, you won’t be able to look away – but it’s a nifty entertainment that’s always easy on the eyes and gains just a bit of dramatic weight as it moves forward.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    RED
    All those guys are a blast, and the dark-hearted idiocy of Red is mostly quite enjoyable.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    If you're bored by the action scenes or the love story or the dopey domestic comedy, just wait three minutes for something else to come along - and whoever you are, you won't be bored by the musical numbers!
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    When Vikram Gandhi set out to become a guru, he didn't expect to really become a guru. But that's what happens in his slippery, ambiguous, tense and finally moving Kumaré, which is officially termed a documentary but could also be considered as the video corollary to a thorny work of performance art.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    I suppose the perfect ending to the chapter would be to report that The Beaver is a masterpiece. It isn't quite, but it does offer an astonishing and resonant performance by Gibson, who spends most of the movie playing two simultaneous characters, often in the same shot.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's perhaps most remarkable as a sweet, mysterious portrait of pre-flood New Orleans, which Almereyda not incorrectly portrays as a land of wandering, uncertain souls.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a small film, but it moved me and made me angry. Both reactions, in this context, are worthwhile.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Lone Survivor has no politics in the sense that it presents a more or less factual story about Luttrell and his comrades trying to fight their way out against overwhelming odds, and tells the truth that most of them didn’t make it. But the visual symbolism and the iconography of this movie are not apolitical or ideologically neutral at all.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Even as this film unravels into incoherent, self-justifying moral instruction, it never becomes boring to watch.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    With the genial pairing of Jennifer Aniston as a rich guy’s trophy wife and John Hawkes as a low-rent criminal at the center of a colorful cast and a pitch-perfect rendering of caste-divided Detroit, Life of Crime is a bittersweet end-of-summer surprise.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    A handsome and well-acted film -- if you like that bitten-off, half-Hemingway style -- but also a grim, emotionally strangled one with a strong sadistic current, no genuinely likable characters and almost no humor.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Add Christopher Walken, giving one of his patented demented performances as a Kurtz-esque mining tycoon deep in the Amazon jungle, along with some vague Hollywood politics about labor exploitation, and The Rundown is far too cheerful and good-hearted to be terrible.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Copying Beethoven has an ace up its sleeve: the wonder and drama of the Ninth Symphony itself (heard here in Bernard Haitink's tremendous 1996 recording with the Royal Concertgebouw).
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Nights and Weekends knocked me out when I saw it last March at the South by Southwest festival in Austin, Texas; I wrote at the time that it offered exactly the "prickly, flawed, urgent SXSW experience I'd been waiting for."
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Tower Heist is funny in the way of so many Hollywood comedies, meaning that individual scenes are often crisply written and played, but the whole doesn't add up to anything.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    I feel prodigious emotion underneath the pretty, preserved features of The Ballad of Jack and Rose, channeled into a vehicle that's a half-successful imitation of "You Can Count on Me" or "In the Bedroom."
    • 59 Metascore
    • 20 Andrew O'Hehir
    J. Edgar turns out to be one of the worst ideas anybody's ever had, a mendacious, muddled, sub-mediocre mess that turns some of the most explosive episodes of the 20th century into bad domestic melodrama and refuses to take any clear position on one of American history's most controversial figures.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is an ambling, relaxed talking-head docu in the grand European style.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Change of Plans may not be earth-shattering cinema, but it's masterfully structured and edited (by Sylvie Landra) with a first-rate cast.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    An exhaustive, exciting and ultimately exhausting history of how that white powder, and the Colombian crime lords who imported it by the hundreds of kilos, transformed the culture and economy of Miami, for good and for ill.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    An intriguing blend of mainstream audience-pleaser and a more subtle, even intellectual agenda.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Once again, the filmmaker gets incredibly wobbly at the end of his story, and his resolution of both the alien incursion and of Graham's crisis of faith feels more like a cheap trick than the product of a genuine belief in anything at all.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Warm Bodies is more a mild-mannered, emo-flavored romcom than a zombie movie. It has some tepid action scenes, a few swatches of genuine humor and a general spirit of cheerfulness, especially considering it depicts a future in which civilization has been destroyed.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Investigative journalist Donal MacIntyre's film is fairly standard British TV product, closer to a glorified "60 Minutes" segment then to cinematic art. But never mind -- its subject is, as he might say, feckin' amazing.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Savages is enjoyable in a way that's almost but not quite intentional camp; it's like eating a dinner made by a 7-year-old, with cake for every course, interspersed with Jell-O, Pepperidge Farm goldfish and chocolate sprinkles.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    Begins as pseudo-realism before descending into weird and mangled wank-job fantasy.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Mostly it's got a barely tolerable level of metaness.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's highly enjoyable even if (like me) you're not much of a Potterphile.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 30 Andrew O'Hehir
    This might be the edgiest film of the year -- if the year were 1982.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's an ambitious, uneven, surprisingly talky melodrama.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    As enjoyable as Close is, Heights as a whole is a mannered simulation that only occasionally and accidentally feels like real New York life.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    What If could be the breakthrough film that underappreciated Canadian director Michael Dowse (“Goon” and “It’s All Gone Pete Tong”) has been waiting for, and at any rate it’s a sparkling screwball highball, perfect for a late-summer weekend.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Alternately winsome and irritating documentary.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Director Ian Allen (a longtime playwright and stage director) has lovingly re-created the look and indeed narrative style of silent film -- and he's from Salt Lake City, so if he says Mormons are vampires with hypnotic powers, who am I to argue? I suppose this is a one-note joke, more in the style of '70s avant-garde camp than anything else. But, hey, at least it's a funny joke.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    I'm still not quite sure why it's so compelling. I think this movie's appeal is overdetermined, as we used to say in sophomore Marxist-theory class, meaning that it derives from so many sources you can't keep track of them all.