For 1,313 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 64% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 34% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Andrew O'Hehir's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Ten
Lowest review score: 0 The Replacements
Score distribution:
1,313 movie reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    The cut-rate colossus didn't just ride the tide that sucked industrial jobs out of our towns and cities and spat out low-wage service-sector jobs in the sprawling exurbs -- it helped create it, and at the very least drastically accelerated it.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    You can't imagine a soapier setup, but Gilles' Wife taken on its own terms is a spectacular achievement, a heartbreaking cinematic work that finely balances melodrama, family love story and devastating tragedy.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a fine example of British commercial filmmaking at its highest level of craftsmanship.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Almost as exhilarating as it is depressing. Puiu's filmmaking technique is remarkable, and all the more so because it's almost invisible.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a magnificent miniature, a supremely tender work that's full of emotion and even sentimentality.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    A haunting and riveting work, unlike anything else you can see at the movies and as such an explicit challenge to the unambitious, anesthetic character of most contemporary cinema. But is it easy, or delightful, or fun? It is not.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    One of the best films of the year.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    I can't imagine anyone not being both horrified and fascinated by Stanley Nelson's Jonestown: The Life and Death of People's Temple.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    So truly and exceptionally fine, a spiny and dispassionate little masterpiece of a marriage movie.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Another remarkable chapter in the career of Asia's most important living filmmaker. After "Pan's Labyrinth," this is the movie to see this season.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    The GoodTimes Kid has a whimsy, a passion, a sophistication and, above all, a vigor that's mostly drained out of Amerindie cinema over the last decade or so.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a carefully and almost classically balanced combination of ingredients, blending dirty-faced realism (so much more damning because it judges and condemns no one) with mystical fable of quest and homecoming.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    A magical and supernally beautiful meditative drug-trip head-space picture (a full-fledged ZZM, q.v. above) for which all Euro-film masochists should rearrange their schedules. It'll be out on DVD soon, and that's great. But Garrel's films are almost never seen on the big screen, and this one's worth it.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    What feels at first like a quiet, straightforward picture builds into one of the richest and most satisfying of the year so far, in any genre or any language.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    I was thrilled and transported by it. It's a two-hour movie, and I'm only sorry it isn't two or three times as long.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Arias' blend of traditional cell animation and 3-D CGI effects is thoroughly mind-blowing, and the film's visual sensibility is utterly distinctive.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Pitch-perfect social comedy.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    A wrenching, funny and wise little picture, with a diva-like junior star at its center.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    May well be the most exciting documentary of the year so far. I guess it took a British director, David Sington, to capture the story of the dozen American men who walked on the moon -- the only human beings in our species history yet to visit another celestial body.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's the most original picture by an American director I've seen this year, and also the most delightful.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    A dark and mesmerizing immersion into a distinctive world.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Announces the arrival of a director radically out of step with the dominant conventions of American moviemaking, one who blends a social-realist vision and a passion for cinematic poetry.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's both happy and sad. That's exactly the way to describe Hou's marvelous film as well.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Gibney's immensely funny and sad new motion picture Gonzo: The Life and Work of Dr. Hunter S. Thompson -- the "Dr." was a mail-order divinity degree -- is principally intended to rehabilitate Thompson and introduce his work to a new audience.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    If this actually were 1968, the pipe-smoking sophisticates of "Esquire" and "Playboy" would be proclaiming I Served the King of England a nettlesome masterpiece. For whatever good it does this film today, I'll stick my pipe in my mug and agree.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Intimate, terrifying and positively riveting documentary.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    A work of tremendous passion, daring and delicacy.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    A distinctive achievement, a World War II movie unlike any other and one of the few films ever to address a topic that makes almost everyone want to look away: What happens to women in wartime.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Dark, sleek, funny and creepily infectious, the genetic-engineering horror-comedy Splice is a dynamic comeback vehicle for Canadian genre director Vincenzo Natali, who made a splash a few years ago with "Cube."
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Of course the films and the books each have to stand on their own, but Grisoni's stripped-down narrative definitely offers advantages, throwing some of the story's archetypal themes into sharper relief.