Andrew O'Hehir

Select another critic »
For 1,476 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Andrew O'Hehir's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 L'Enfant (The Child)
Lowest review score: 0 Identity Thief
Score distribution:
1476 movie reviews
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Fruitvale Station is a document of irreparable grief and paradoxical hopefulness; it launches the careers of two immensely talented young African-American artists and offers the possibility that Oscar Grant’s life, while it was much too short and ended so dreadfully, served a higher purpose in the long arc of history.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    One of the most exciting Hollywood action films in years, and the best Vietnam movie since "Apocalypse Now."
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    A nerve-jangling work of visual poetry and ironic juxtaposition, and a powerful human story of a group of brave young Americans.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    The Master is often spectacular and never less than handsome, and it has numerous moments of disturbing and almost electrical power. I can't say, after one viewing, that I found it moving or satisfying as a whole, but I'm also not sure it's supposed to be. This is an almost apocalyptic tale of thwarted emotion - love cut short - set in a pitiless land of delusions.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    It offers some of the best Asian martial-arts choreography of recent years and an electric, claustrophobic puzzle-palace atmosphere that'll leave you wrung out and buzzed.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    One of the most remarkable explorations of recent history ever conducted.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    And then would come this generous, spirited documentary, to capture one of the strangest and most inspiring of all family stories of tragedy and triumph that this crazy country has produced.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a warm, richly funny and highly enjoyable human story that takes an intriguing sideways glance at a crucial period in 20th-century history.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Burns has accomplished something both remarkable and reassuring. Remarkable because this is a compelling film, blending astonishing historical images with long-winded talking-head interviews, in vintage Burnsian style, and reassuring for almost the same reason.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    So truly and exceptionally fine, a spiny and dispassionate little masterpiece of a marriage movie.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    The Tree of Life is pretty much nuts overall, a manic hybrid folly with flashes of brilliance. But even if that's true it's a noble crazy, a miraculous William Butler Yeats kind of crazy, alive with passion for art and the world, for all that is lost and not lost and still to come.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    There are so many great things happening on almost every level of this movie, from Swinton's haunting, magnetic and tremendously vulnerable performance, which is absolutely free of condescension to the suburban American wife-ness of her character, to the many unsettling individual moments.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    If Alfred Hitchcock had grown up as a Palestinian, he might have made something like Hany Abu-Assad’s Oscar-nominated Omar, which is a tender love story, a haunting tragedy and an expertly crafted thriller with flawed, damaged and not entirely likable characters.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    An elegantly crafted entertainment, balanced between the psychological and the supernatural, that gets extra credit for not relying on computer effects.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Masterfully paced and constructed, and the performances are memorable.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    An engaging and often wrenching film, Food, Inc. covers a wide range of material, including the horrific, the humorous and the exemplary.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    But at his best - and his new movie, The Day He Arrives, is among his very best - Hong offers a strange mixture of magic, mystery, rueful melodrama and dry comedy that's like absolutely nothing else.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Cowperthwaite builds a portrait of an intelligent but profoundly traumatized animal who was taken from his family in the North Atlantic as an infant, and has been driven to anger, resentment and perhaps psychosis after spending his life in a series of concrete swimming pools.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Inherent Vice is like that; you’ll have to enjoy it for the pileup of exquisite images and hilarious episodes, and let go of the need to hold the whole thing in your head, or you won’t enjoy it at all.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    What makes Tulpan remarkable are the extended unbroken scenes, both dramatic and comic.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    I love Jackson's "Rings" saga despite his propensity for whimsical animation whenever he tries to strike a chord of dread or menace.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Aladag's point, I think, is that no matter how righteous we may feel about this kind of zero-sum cultural collision, for the human beings involved it often results in unbearable tragedy.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Intimate, terrifying and positively riveting documentary.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a dark and dazzling spectacle.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's by far the funniest and warmest movie Araki has ever made, with much less juvenile angst and much more command of his craft.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's the most ambitious and impressive Coen film in at least a decade, featuring the flat, sun-blasted landscapes of west Texas -- spectacularly shot by cinematographer Roger Deakins -- and an eerily memorable performance by Javier Bardem, in a Ringo Starr haircut.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    A work of tremendous passion, daring and delicacy.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    An inexpressibly beautiful and moving film, even though (or because) it seems to be about someone unimportant doing something irrelevant, perhaps something silly, in the face of insurmountable odds and a world that doesn't care.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a fine example of British commercial filmmaking at its highest level of craftsmanship.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    I can't imagine anyone not being both horrified and fascinated by Stanley Nelson's Jonestown: The Life and Death of People's Temple.

Top Trailers