Andrew O'Hehir

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For 1,423 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Andrew O'Hehir's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 Bronson
Lowest review score: 0 The Human Centipede II (Full Sequence)
Score distribution:
1,423 movie reviews
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew O'Hehir
    With all his artifice, his prodigious narrative risks and seemingly undisciplined mélange of styles and tones, Desplechin has made a film that feels more like real life than anything I've seen in years, from any source. It's a masterpiece.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew O'Hehir
    Old Joy is only 76 minutes long, but it has the contemplative power of Buddhist meditation. Reichardt gives us long, stoned takes of rural roads; shots of birds, insects and slugs in the spectacular Oregon rain forest; interludes with Mark's dog, Lucy. Some viewers may well be bored, or monumentally irritated, by this. I found it masterly, riveting.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    A highly unusual combination of craft, emotion and integrity.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Ballast is an audacious and ambiguous debut from a filmmaker whose motives and aims are not as transparent as they seem.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew O'Hehir
    A marvelous ensemble cast and all the visceral impact and moment-to-moment tension of a fine thriller, together with the distinctive visual style of an art film.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    The Descendants is gentle, witty, audience-friendly entertainment for grown-ups, with a great performance by one of our biggest screen stars.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    The evident strengths and laudable intentions of Before the Devil Knows You're Dead (and even the appeal of Marisa Tomei in her undies) are overwhelmed by an implausible plot verging on unintentional comedy and a panoply of Noo Yawk dirt-bag supporting characters who might've seemed awkward on a 1993 episode of "NYPD Blue."
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew O'Hehir
    Despite its clichéd elements, Dallas Buyers Club is a fierce celebration of the unpredictable power that belongs to the outcast, the despised, the pariah. That’s not a story of the ‘80s, it’s a story of always.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Alone among the works I've seen and read about Iraq in the last three years, Iraq in Fragments captures the tremendous complexity and variability of the country, offering neither facile hope nor fashionable despair.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew O'Hehir
    What's so remarkable about Louie Psihoyos' documentary The Cove isn't just that it's a powerful work of agitprop that's going to have you sending furious e-mails to the Japanese Embassy on your way out of the theater. That's definitely true, but the effectiveness of The Cove also comes from its explosive cinematic craft, its surprising good humor and its pure excitement.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    The Waiting Room is a source of both inspiration and hope. The system may be broken, but the people are not.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    A highly enjoyable failure, a quandary that can't resolve itself.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Richly enjoyable and consistently surprising.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    A feverish, breathtaking tour through Mexico City high and low, an explosive, mosaic-style portrait of our continent's largest city.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Announces the arrival of a director radically out of step with the dominant conventions of American moviemaking, one who blends a social-realist vision and a passion for cinematic poetry.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    '71
    It’s a riveting, man-on-the-run genre movie, almost a combination of “Black Hawk Down” and “After Hours,” rather than an allegory or a historical treatise.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Cowperthwaite builds a portrait of an intelligent but profoundly traumatized animal who was taken from his family in the North Atlantic as an infant, and has been driven to anger, resentment and perhaps psychosis after spending his life in a series of concrete swimming pools.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    A work of immense mystery and strangeness, loaded with unforgettable images, spectacular sweeps of color and nested, hidden meanings. It feels to me like a meditative epic about Japan’s traumatic journey into modernity, and a complicated allegory about the innocence, arrogance and culpability of artists. It’s one of the most beautiful animated films ever made, and something close to a masterpiece.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is one of those moving, tragic and triumphant secret histories of American culture where the biggest surprise is that no one’s told it before.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew O'Hehir
    A masterful and often deeply moving portrait of a volatile American genius, a portrait that goes far beyond one man, one family and one rain-sodden small town. It depicts the society that nurtured and fed that genius, and that made his unlikely creative explosion possible, as being the same environment that poisoned him — and suggests that the rise and fall were inextricably connected.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    If Paranoid Park is mainly an accumulation of the signs and symbols and images inside Van Sant's own head, that's artistically legitimate. When he makes a feeble effort to connect Alex's plight to the Iraq war and the cultural climate of Bush-era America, I just don't buy it.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew O'Hehir
    You don't have to know the first thing about modern dance to be transported to an alternate state of consciousness by Pina, which is utterly free of Wenders' cloying sentimentality (perhaps because it's an elegy for a dead friend) and might be the first of his films I've loved all the way through since his 1987 masterpiece, "Wings of Desire."
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a distinctive, ominous and hypnotic work of cinema.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew O'Hehir
    Instead of sticking with the familiar, Scorsese has followed his impulses into something that feels entirely new but is still distinctively his. He has made a potential holiday classic, an exciting, comic and sentimental melodrama that will satisfy children and adults alike and reward repeat viewings for many years to come.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Not far below the surface Captain Phillips is also an unpleasant and uncomfortable experience, a film that’s not entirely happy with itself.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Fast-paced, often hilarious fun and involves an imaginative and deeply weird use of cutting-edge digital animation.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Ultimately Gordon's movie becomes both a hilarious story about an unbelievable collection of arrested-teenage morons and, yes, an inspiring fable of persistence and redemption. I haven't mentioned this movie's fabulous addition to the English language yet, so here it is: the verb "to chumpatize."
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew O'Hehir
    I recognize how few horror movies I've seen before or since that ever manage to capture such a tangible feeling of menace.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    It isn't likely to drive anybody out of the theater -- although getting people out of the house to see a meticulous, minimalist study of madness and memory may be another story.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Bruno Dumont's Hadewijch is one of two small-release art films this season that deliver nuanced and fascinating portraits of faith.

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