Andrew Pulver

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For 52 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Andrew Pulver's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Let's Get Lost
Lowest review score: 40 Narcopolis
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 18 out of 52
  2. Negative: 0 out of 52
52 movie reviews
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew Pulver
    It's not exactly a documentary, more a lovingly-filmed homage, but some candid interview material allows scraps of Baker's story to emerge.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Pulver
    The co-operation between Wenders and Salgado Jr works well, mixing the former's heavyweight presence as both interviewer and storyteller, and the latter's ability to harvest intimate, deep-buried subtleties that may otherwise not have seen the light of day. Together they have made a moving tribute to a peerless talent.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Pulver
    People are unlikely to charge out of the cinema with quite the same level of glee as they did in 2009; but this is certainly an astute, exhilarating concoction.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Pulver
    Black's performance is a revelation: foregoing his usual repertoire of jiggling, tics and head-waggling craziness, Black ensures Tiede is a satirical creation of considerable substance. Really impressive.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Pulver
    It's the successul synthesis of the two – action and emotion – that means this Spider-Man is as enjoyable as it is impressive: Webb's control of mood and texture is near faultless as his film switches from teenage sulks to exhilarating airborne pyrotechnics.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Pulver
    It is Davies’ ability to invest even the most apparently-humdrum moments with some form of intense radiance that sustains his film.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Pulver
    '71
    It's a film that holds you in a vice-like grip throughout; only wavering towards the end with a faintly preposterous climactic shootout.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Pulver
    Hail, Caesar! is a lot of fun, and beautifully crafted, too. One to savour.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Pulver
    What results is an immensely detailed overview of Marley's life and times, from the hillside Jamaican shack where he grew up to the snowy Bavarian clinic where he spent his last weeks in a fruitless attempt to cure the cancer that killed him in 1981, aged 36.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Pulver
    The Aardman vision of contemporary England is generous, inclusive and - if a fast-moving film about a smart-alec sheep can allow itself such grandiose ambitions – genuinely inspiring.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Pulver
    The way the allegory works out is not exactly subtle or unexpected, but is strangely moving, despite the gruesomeness that has gone before. All in all, a treat.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Pulver
    Bujalski really has pulled off something extraordinary here.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Pulver
    With this film, Anderson has built a thoroughly likable vision of a prewar Europe – no more real, perhaps, than the kind of Viennese light-operetta that sustained much of 1930s Hollywood – but a distinctive, attractive proposition all the same. It's a nimblefooted, witty piece, but one also imbued with a premonitory sadness at the coming conflagration.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Pulver
    Let's hope Klayman gets to make a sequel.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Pulver
    It's ambitious enough to aim at polished, intelligent character drama, and pulls it off successfully.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Pulver
    In its current state, Neighbors is filthy, nasty and a bit too sloppy. But it’ll scrub up lovely.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Pulver
    Junger articulates a number of subtle and unexpected ideas about Hetherington's work, and about combat reporting in general.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Pulver
    This may not be the director’s most immediately electrifying film, but in its understated way, it’s an immensely powerful work.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Pulver
    She's entertaining enough, and like most fashion documentaries, it's a mine of pop-cultural history, but the unswervingly generous assessment of her achievements and permanently arch vocal style become a little wearying.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Pulver
    For Cash devotees who want a hitherto-hidden perspective on their man, though, this is invaluable viewing.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Pulver
    Though high-minded and well-intentioned – as well as being conceived on an epic scale – there’s something faintly stodgy and safety-first about the endeavour.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Pulver
    It's a slight, attractive tale: a childlike fable of a little girl and her preternaturally intelligent cat that swiftly devolves into a very old-school cops and robbers yarn.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Pulver
    Margarita, With a Straw is a sturdily conceived, emotionally direct drama.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Pulver
    A genial, lightweight farce, which largely approximates Hornby's distinctively bittersweet tone.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Pulver
    It’s tough to take all the hardcore emoting seriously, particularly as the emotional heavy lifting is designed to be done by the occasional maudlin line in brief pauses between the explosions. For a film so concerned with its characters’ inner lives, there’s a fundamental disconnect going on here – enough to make you yearn for the lighter touch of the Marvel films.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Pulver
    Pacific Rim's wafer-thin psychodrama and plot-generator dialogue provides little for the human component to get their teeth into.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Pulver
    Promised Land seems to lose its nerve a little politically: as it goes on, you realise it isn't about fracking at all, but a tract on machiavellian corporate behaviour and their employees' self-deception.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Pulver
    This Anchorman sequel knows who its fans are, and does its best to keep them happy. No one will be complaining.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Pulver
    This fantastically depressing film ought to be shown in school assemblies, or wherever impressionable pre-teens gather to discuss their dreams of media stardom.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Pulver
    Like Agatha Christie’s detective novels, there would appear little in the way of aesthetic – as opposed to technological – progression; having set the tone so definitively at the outset, each film delivered exactly what it promised.

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