Andrew Schenker
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For 194 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 21% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 75% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Andrew Schenker's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 50
Highest review score: 100 Stray Dogs
Lowest review score: 0 Act of Valor
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 70 out of 194
  2. Negative: 62 out of 194
194 movie reviews
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Suffers from both an odd, ineffective structure and a low-key tone that jars uncomfortably with the subject matter and makes the film's stakes seem unnecessary low.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Jason Moore's film is more or less successful in inverse proportion to the degree that it plays its material by the book.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    The film is far too indulgent with its lead character to do more than hint at the ways that one form of male egotism can morph into another.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Nancy Savoca's film begins in caricature and ends in sentimentality, only briefly hitting the sweet spot in between.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    The film is too tepid in its treatment of its central character and her situation to generate any real emotive charge.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Essentially the film aims to trade in the awkwardness of teen sexuality, but too often settles for the gross-out gag instead.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Fitfully engaging, but the documentary turns into a touchy-feely isn't-it-wonderful-we're-all-saved love fest as soon as the universalists begin to dominate the interview segments.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    The film is somewhat flimsy, tinged with the impulse to make the elderly characters just the right amount of ridiculous for the benefit of younger viewers.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    This twist-heavy World War II drama would play as an absurdist comedy if the director wasn't so dead set on excluding just about any trace of humor from his self-serious project.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    For all the revelations about the way the rich operate, there's little juicy pleasure to be had in the proceedings.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    The characters never sound like they're actually talking to one another, but rather delivering Jeff Lipsky's echo-chamber monologues.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    The film seldom pushes beyond the bare-minimum dictates of the thriller, only rarely offering up a memorable action sequence.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    The movie aims for an admirable balance, but fatally upsets that equilibrium in its hurried resolutions.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    All of this could be very funny, but while the film does deliver some strong comic turns, far too much time is spent watching an inactive Kofman whining about his lot.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    For all of the director's willingness to explore his characters' unexpected depths, he's still hamstrung by his perpetually tasteful cinema-of-quality aesthetic.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Much of the film's attempted laughs come from the comedy-of-discomfort school, with an endless array of situations that milk awkwardness to a degree that makes these scenes far more unpleasant than humorous to watch.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    The film scores all of its thematic points early, commenting intriguingly, if ultimately rather obviously, on the demands of Japanese patriarchy.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    The alignment with Herman's perspective, even as it never downplays the gravity of his crimes, leads the film into a set of obvious conclusions.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Is an exploration of sex addiction, in all its different manifestations, the new flavor of the week in contemporary American cinema?
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    The film rarely takes us past its rather obvious conclusions about the potential bestial nature of kids and how that may translate to the larger battlefields.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    The film smartly avoids the sort of cynical hijinks that characterize the majority of Vegas-set flicks, though it can't come up with anything more compelling to place in its stead.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Ralph Fiennes's film feels not so much rooted in the past as it is mired in conventions about how to portray that past.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    The modern-day sections with Mariel Hemingway, while detailing the redemptive promise of the title, too often come across as either indulgent time-filler or overflow with PSA-level superficiality.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Alternating between self-consciously offbeat comedy and existential J-horror, It's Me, It's Me never quite satisfies in either mode.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Schenker
    Even as Deb comes to embrace the vibrancy of urban life, she's still prey to a blinkered suburban viewpoint which becomes inscribed in the film itself.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Schenker
    Enjoyment of Jeff Kaplan's film will vary given your capacity to simultaneously laugh and wink at the hijinks of two of the least palatable characters to share screen time in recent years.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Schenker
    When Diana's fixations begin to take over, Fidell seems ill-prepared to steer the film into strictly psychological territory, resulting in a project that loses its fraught sense of control at the same moment as its embattled protagonist.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    For a film that had once made some pretense toward exposing such dangerously submissive attitudes toward Hollywood romance, Friends with Benefits's conclusion can't help but seem more than a wee bit disingenuous.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    Of all the vaguely philosophical, calculatedly left-of-center dialogue that peppers Miranda July's The Future, no line is more telling than the writer/director/star's late-film declaration, in the guise of her character Sophie, that "I'm saying okay to nothing."
    • 76 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    Life lessons abound in Buck, most of them tied to endlessly reiterated comparisons between man and horse.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    Sarah's Key becomes a musing ("meditation" would be too generous) on the importance of uncovering the past that fails to honestly contemplate why such an act is significant.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    When does intensity and commitment supersede historical understanding?
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    What's perhaps most off-putting about the movie isn't its increasingly stale humor, but the way it ultimately validates its characters' worst impulses.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    Francesca Gregorini and Tatiana von Furstenberg's film is episodic, but the episodes don't achieve any kind of cumulative effect.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    Like most of the film's performances, Sisley's comes off as flat and impenetrable, the result both of a certain stoical conception of character and the dissipation of focus that arises from the movie's perceived need to encompass so much.
    • 6 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    Played as broadly and as crudely as you please (in terms of acting, direction, "edgy" dialogue), Prince of Swine paints a grimly ugly portrait of male sexual violence and female submission.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    Naturally, given the film's somewhat precious air of spiritualism, the parroted phrase that speaks most clearly to Lyman is a quotation from the book of Ecclesiastes that gives the film its title and gives Fiona a chance to offer a blithely optimistic interpretation of that most dour of Biblical books.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    The film is so careful to avoid the luridness that would seem inevitably to accompany an excavation of child kidnapping, forced labor, and rape, that the result is a plodding, overly tasteful procedural that holds up its hero as an incorruptible embodiment of goodness.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    What unfolds is a predictably anguished story of true love thwarted by material circumstances, or in the terms dictated by the film, rationality triumphing over romance.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    The first half of the film is a virtual compendium of high-culture references, topical concerns addressed almost in passing, and narrative fracturing devices.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    Nuri Bilge Ceylan has to be the least kinetic of working filmmakers - and not simply in the sense of static camerawork or lack of narrative momentum.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    A predictable, drawn-out romantic comedy that happens to be set in the shadow of impending apocalypse.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    A (relatively) tasteful and restrained approach to potentially lurid subject matter isn't necessarily any better than one that gives in freely to what might be seen as a filmmaker's baser impulses.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    While the heart of the movie is the at-times strained relationship between the two leads, it all unfolds rather by the numbers, dictated more by the expected arc of such things than the demands of the characters.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    Gentler and less aesthetically assaultive than offerings like 0s & 1s and Catfish, but it's not necessarily any subtler or more enlightening.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    Debbie Goodstein-Rosenfeld's film seems oddly anemic when it deals with anyone but Chazz Palminteri's Joe.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    Far more concerned with indulging a slightly less glossy Slumdog Millionaire-like aesthetic than dealing with the frayed relationships of its characters.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    Shifting between wacky situation comedy and somber familial drama, Why Stop Now? isn't invested enough in either mode to convincingly pull off its genre-hopping ambitions.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    With Danny Way almost never weighing in directly, the film's attempts to portray his story as an inspirational tale of triumph over adversity scarcely registers.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    Director Erik Canuel fails to deliver us from the inevitable hermeticism of the material.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    A cursory history lesson with no interest in probing the deeper or more complex implications of Mandela's positions and their relationship to his country's shifting landscape.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    Joseph Gordon-Levitt's directorial debut does for porn-dependence what Shame did for sex addiction by offering a surface-level look at the effects of its specific pathology on its lead male character.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    At the center of the film, festering like an open sore, is the stereotype of the psycho lesbian bitch.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 30 Andrew Schenker
    Cassavetes puts over this simple, poorly acted story with moody lighting, self-consciously "beautiful" gore, and an annoying penchant for impressionistic quick-cut flashbacks, all of which get in the way of rather than enhance the supposed fun.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 30 Andrew Schenker
    Mukunda Michael Dewil's film has the makings of a taut little thriller, but the writer-director has the twin disadvantages of needing to include dialogue and to rely on the services of Paul Walker to embody his protagonist.
    • 16 Metascore
    • 30 Andrew Schenker
    Amardeep Kaleka's documentary often seems like little more than preaching-to-the-converted, New Age drivel.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 25 Andrew Schenker
    High school creative-writing-class ironies of all kinds abound in The Help.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 25 Andrew Schenker
    Mostly the movie's varied storylines cough up the same platitudes: being pregnant sucks, having young children is a misery, but it's all worth it when you're holding that newborn in your arms.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 25 Andrew Schenker
    The making of The Way must have been a nice moment for father and son, but why must the rest of us suffer?
    • 71 Metascore
    • 25 Andrew Schenker
    Not everyone's life is compelling enough to warrant the documentary treatment, but whether this truism applies to master puppeteer and current Sesame Street producer Kevin Clash is a question that Being Elmo: A Puppeteer's Journey, Constance Marks's fawning portrait of the Muppet- master fails to answer.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 25 Andrew Schenker
    Excepting a momentary late-film lapse into eye-rolling double-exposure tomfoolery, the film is as aesthetically bland as a film could conceivably be, the perfunctory camerawork imbuing the proceedings with an ugly, indistinctive gloss.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 25 Andrew Schenker
    It's hard to say which is worse: the unfunny caricatures or the indulgent soul-searching.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 25 Andrew Schenker
    Overly expository dialogue abounds throughout Martin Guigui's movie, as do questionable filmmaking choices and plenty of stupidly unconvincing actions taken on the part of the film's characters.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 25 Andrew Schenker
    C├ędric Klapisch settles for a mixture of bland obviousness and crudely manufactured drama.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 25 Andrew Schenker
    Albatross is simply a compendium of bad ideas.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 25 Andrew Schenker
    A year in the life of a young woman unhappy in love and uncertain in career, Lola Versus could easily be faulted for the narrowness of its worldview.
    • 14 Metascore
    • 25 Andrew Schenker
    Unsurprisingly for a film detailing terminal disease, this is a largely solemn affair, often verging on morbidity in its elongated deathwatch.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 25 Andrew Schenker
    Writer-director Nika Agiashvili buys into the concept of the American dream with the zeal of a true believer.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 25 Andrew Schenker
    The film is awash in blandly brown-toned cinematography, action scenes more violent than rousing, and a whole host of bathetic subplots.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 25 Andrew Schenker
    A safe, laugh-free exercise that gets to have its fun, such as it is, because it's all in the service of the most conservative notions of domestic normality.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 25 Andrew Schenker
    In Jay and Mark Duplass's film, the fragile middle-aged male ego is indulged, massaged, and, finally, critiqued.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 25 Andrew Schenker
    The Details is as smug and self-satisfied as its privileged lead character.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 25 Andrew Schenker
    The film speeds ahead with almost gleeful disinterest in dealing with the narrative challenges it sets up before resolving them in the most perfunctory ways imaginable.
    • 17 Metascore
    • 25 Andrew Schenker
    Essentially a horror movie in which the source of the horror shifts from capital-M men to crazed lesbianism.
    • 20 Metascore
    • 25 Andrew Schenker
    What most rankles about the film is the way that its insistence on paternal instincts as the principal signifier of male adulthood leads it to sanction the most childlike behavior of all.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 25 Andrew Schenker
    Mark Steven Johnson's Killing Season is a hard movie to take seriously, which is particularly unfortunate since it deals with such weighty issues as genocide, the ethical compromises that everyone makes in combat, and the lingering effects of wartime decisions on participants years down the line.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 25 Andrew Schenker
    Kat Coiro's film takes the comedy of discomfort to new levels of cringe-worthiness by presenting.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 12 Andrew Schenker
    Awesomeness seems to be the chief quality prized by both the film and its characters; all other considerations--like safety, property damage, and especially good taste--are secondary.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 12 Andrew Schenker
    Only a few snippets escape the uncritical narcissism that the film celebrates and, despite their unimaginative employment, they stand as something of a rebuke to the film's dominant images.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 12 Andrew Schenker
    David Guy Levy's movie foregrounds the potential ugliness of modern technology in order to comment on it. But that doesn't make the film's visuals any less hideous.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 12 Andrew Schenker
    At once hopelessly amateurish and given to desperate assertions of auterist "virtuosity."
    • 38 Metascore
    • 12 Andrew Schenker
    Until its pair of ludicrous twist endings, which complicates its message and logistics in ways that make little sense, Gabe Torres's Brake plays like a more simplistic version of Buried tailored specifically to a hawkish right-wing crowd.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 12 Andrew Schenker
    This dry-as-dust enterprise bogs down in an almost total lack of energy and imagination that no amount of faux earnestness can overcome.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 12 Andrew Schenker
    By the dictates of the boys-will-be-boys party genre, 21 and Over is so tame that it barely manages to even be offensive.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 12 Andrew Schenker
    While the male characters are certainly not presented as models of enlightened behavior, their antics and crises are indulged in a manner not extended to their female counterparts.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 12 Andrew Schenker
    It seems as if Craig Zobel wants to implicate the audience in these proceedings, but he doesn't have a very clear idea how to go about it.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 12 Andrew Schenker
    If you've ever seen Psycho, or even if you know anything at all about the film, Sacha Gervasi's Hitchcock would like to congratulate you on your savvy.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 12 Andrew Schenker
    There's but one sequence in the entire movie that offers even the slightest bit of filmmaking verve, and even this speaks to the project's essential myopia.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 0 Andrew Schenker
    A movie whose cinematic ineptitude is matched only by its ideological rottenness, Act of Valor features a cast of real-life active-duty Navy SEALS in order to grant the project's us-versus-them geopolitical worldview a sham moral authority.