Andrew Schenker
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For 194 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 21% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 75% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Andrew Schenker's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 50
Highest review score: 100 The Turin Horse
Lowest review score: 0 Act of Valor
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 70 out of 194
  2. Negative: 62 out of 194
194 movie reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Boy
    Less concerned with rendering the specifics of its setting (a small Maori town on the New Zealand coast) than in calling on bouts of whimsy and superficial cultural signifiers to approximate the headspace of its central characters.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Joseph Cedar's Footnote is a sour, rather unpleasant affair that hinges on acts of Jews behaving badly.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    For the most part, this is a boys-will-be-boys movie that excuses everything its pair of protags do in the name of some sort of cosmic order.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    While everything here is mostly unspoken, and the film itself hints at a broader set of concerns than simply two lost souls meeting on foreign ground, Here too often feels like a jumble of ideas that don't quite cohere.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Both an informative bit of agitprop and an ultra slick and slightly self-satisfied bit of entertainment.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Suffers from both an odd, ineffective structure and a low-key tone that jars uncomfortably with the subject matter and makes the film's stakes seem unnecessary low.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    The film is far too indulgent with its lead character to do more than hint at the ways that one form of male egotism can morph into another.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    What saves the film from being simply a schematic mother-daughter reconciliation drama is both the reluctance and prickliness that Catherine Keener brings to her character.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Class privilege and sexual politics are inextricably linked in Trishna, Michael Winterbottom's blunt, self-consciously brutal, and rather loose updating of Thomas Hardy's "Tess of the D'Urbervilles."
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Nancy Savoca's film begins in caricature and ends in sentimentality, only briefly hitting the sweet spot in between.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    A half-hearted morality tale about taking responsibility for your actions as a sign of impending maturity.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Fitfully engaging, but the documentary turns into a touchy-feely isn't-it-wonderful-we're-all-saved love fest as soon as the universalists begin to dominate the interview segments.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Jason Moore's film is more or less successful in inverse proportion to the degree that it plays its material by the book.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Undeniably rousing, but deeply irresponsible, Argo fans the flames surrounding historical events likely to still remain raw in the memory of many viewers.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    The film is somewhat flimsy, tinged with the impulse to make the elderly characters just the right amount of ridiculous for the benefit of younger viewers.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    The film is too tepid in its treatment of its central character and her situation to generate any real emotive charge.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    This twist-heavy World War II drama would play as an absurdist comedy if the director wasn't so dead set on excluding just about any trace of humor from his self-serious project.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Allen Hughes may suggest an air of pretty menace, but he does little to make the sequence work as a legible genre scene.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    For all the revelations about the way the rich operate, there's little juicy pleasure to be had in the proceedings.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    The characters never sound like they're actually talking to one another, but rather delivering Jeff Lipsky's echo-chamber monologues.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    The film seldom pushes beyond the bare-minimum dictates of the thriller, only rarely offering up a memorable action sequence.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    The alignment with Herman's perspective, even as it never downplays the gravity of his crimes, leads the film into a set of obvious conclusions.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    The movie aims for an admirable balance, but fatally upsets that equilibrium in its hurried resolutions.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Essentially the film aims to trade in the awkwardness of teen sexuality, but too often settles for the gross-out gag instead.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Much of the film's attempted laughs come from the comedy-of-discomfort school, with an endless array of situations that milk awkwardness to a degree that makes these scenes far more unpleasant than humorous to watch.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    For all of the director's willingness to explore his characters' unexpected depths, he's still hamstrung by his perpetually tasteful cinema-of-quality aesthetic.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Walks a fine line between empathetic treatment of its characters and voyeuristic freakshow gazing.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    The film rarely takes us past its rather obvious conclusions about the potential bestial nature of kids and how that may translate to the larger battlefields.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Is an exploration of sex addiction, in all its different manifestations, the new flavor of the week in contemporary American cinema?
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    The film scores all of its thematic points early, commenting intriguingly, if ultimately rather obviously, on the demands of Japanese patriarchy.