For 1,345 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ann Hornaday's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Bad Education
Lowest review score: 0 The Babysitters
Score distribution:
1,345 movie reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Like Marilyn Monroe and Judy Holliday before him, Tatum is sublime at playing dumb (as a dim pretty boy, he seems to be channeling Brad Pitt in "Burn After Reading"), just as Hill shrewdly deploys his body mass for maximum physical comedy (even slimmed down, with an Oscar nomination under that tightened belt, he carries himself with a fat man's comically elephantine grace).
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    In the taut, emotionally gripping documentary Dinosaur 13, filmmaker Todd Douglas Miller meticulously re-creates seven eventful, tense and finally heartbreaking years.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    First Class happily delivers on the escapism and rich narrative texture the best of its predecessors have promised.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    With warmth, unsparing self-awareness and that ineffable Everyman appeal sometimes called "relatability," Birbiglia proves to be as engaging a presence on the screen as he has been all these years onstage and over the radio waves.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    While its themes of revenge, mutual resentment and grim fatalism offer little hope for a ready solutions, the movie itself testifies to the power of creative collaboration in finding common ground.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Through vivid archival material and voice-overs, the filmmakers create moving vignettes that, taken together, form a fascinating primer on nonviolence as a political force and discipline.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    A wonderfully complex character at the center of a gratifyingly satisfying yarn.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    What does The Future hold? Wonders, each of them weirder and more unnerving than the last.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Lasseter and his team plunge the audience into a collective case of empty- nest syndrome, with a dash of mortal terror thrown in for grins. And again, they make it work.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Provides a welcome seasonal dash of wholesomeness and humor.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Spielberg has created an appropriate showcase for the magnificent creature that emerges, one that recalls the great movie horses of yore in a story guaranteed to pluck, grab and wring viewers' hearts, but thankfully not break them.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    The wittiest jokes and cameo appearances are designed to soar far over the heads of young filmgoers and into the atavistic pop consciousness of their adult companions.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    It's popcorn pulp that collided -- at 100 mph, natch -- with a far more sober and crafty grown-up movie.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Aside from Lillard, the stand-out here is Cook, who plays a new breed of post-feminist Cinderella with a convincing mix of seriousness and vulnerability (although just once, it would be nice if Cinderella could keep her glasses on and still be beautiful). With her doe eyes and peaches-and-organic-yogurt complexion, Cook resembles a young Winona Ryder (if that's possible), right down to the appealing blend of sweetness and self-assurance. [29 Jan 1999: 1E]
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Filled with so much heartbreaking beauty, Bringing Out the Dead might be best described as an artist's sketchbook, a series of tableaux and ideas that provide a telling glimpse of a director whose work is always evolving.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Admittedly, Top Five suffers from its share of too-convenient contrivances and clunky passages... But Top Five is also buoyantly self- sustaining, thanks in part to Rock and Dawson’s easy, convincingly seductive chemistry and some genuinely hilarious surprises.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Depp possesses one of the finest speaking voices in the business - a nimble, mellifluous instrument that can go from sexy growl to fey warble in no seconds flat.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Like a seductively lambent hall of mirrors, The Bling Ring lays bare the venality of train-wreck celebrity culture, striving and self-deception by dramatizing a fact that’s as delicious as it is depressing.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    The new Karate Kid brings fresh life and perspective to the classic tale of perseverance and cross-generational friendship, thanks to Harald Zwart's sensitive direction and two exceptionally appealing stars.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    With Much Ado About Nothing, Whedon has crafted an endearing bagatelle, made with equal parts brio and love, ambition and pared-down modesty.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    As a stylistic and narrative throwback, Alfredson's adamantly un-thrilling procedural reminds viewers of an era when viewers allowed themselves to be entertained by a good yarn about a few colorful or at least colorlessly compelling characters.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    By presenting Avatar in 3-D, Cameron is staking his claim and building a fence around his own precious resource, making it unobtainable on any but his own terms to increasingly emboldened and technologically savvy natives.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    What might have been just another anodyne promo piece or solipsistic valentine instead becomes a funny, eccentric and finally deeply poignant depiction of art, family, ­self-sabotage and the prickly intricacies of brotherly love.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Builds slowly but passionately, not dancing to some Hollywood tune, but finding its characters where they are and letting them be who they are.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Mortensen has called A Dangerous Method Cronenberg's "Merchant-Ivory picture," but it just as often resembles a Woody Allen movie - literate, sophisticated and deeply concerned with sex and manners. (It's even mordantly funny, as an early scene at the Freud family dinner table attests.)
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    But even appreciated simply as a little-known chapter of European history, it proves consistently engrossing, edifying and affecting.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Wiig has the natural beauty and self-deprecating expressiveness it takes to be a star comedienne; she spends much of Bridesmaids looking like a slightly girlier version of Lucinda Williams.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Saving Mr. Banks doesn’t always straddle its stories and time periods with the utmost grace. But the film — which John Lee Hancock directed from a script by Kelly Marcel and Sue Smith — more than makes up for its occasionally unwieldy structure in telling a fascinating and ultimately deeply affecting story.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Grounded in the direct, disarming truth of their experience, the movie has a straightforward lack of cheap sentiment that saves it from being either too maudlin or saccharine-sweet.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Of Miyazaki’s many gifts as a filmmaker, perhaps the most subtle is the way he honors time and silence and stillness, values that are in lamentably short supply in most modern-day productions.

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