For 1,098 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ann Hornaday's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 The Beaches of Agnès
Lowest review score: 0 Alone in the Dark
Score distribution:
1,098 movie reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    A pulpy, deceivingly insightful send-up of horror movies that elicits just as many knowing chuckles as horrified gasps.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    The Avengers has been executed with all the reverence the super-fans demand, as well as the winking, self-referential humor that has made it palatable for filmgoers disinclined to take a bunch of grown men dressed in spangles and spandex so very seriously.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    As a lucid, emotionally involving portrait of the looming crisis surrounding water - supplies of which are dwindling as contamination rises - Jessica Yu's smartly constructed argument works less as a tutorial than as an infectiously impassioned call to arms.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Interspersing "real" people with professional actors, Linklater creates a vivid, gossipy Greek chorus that serves as a kind of collective unreliable narrator -- an altogether appropriate stance given the moral gray zone the sweetly confounding Bernie inhabits.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Moonrise Kingdom is already shaping up to be this summer's art house sleeper hit, and no wonder: It traffics in the very kind of escapist spectacle -- in this case of a thoughtfully composed world brimming with whimsy, enchantment and visual brio -- that the season was made for.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Very little is simple in Your Sister's Sister -- not the emotions, the naturalistic tone or the unstudied, easygoing performances. But the film's pleasures are.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Dick, whose films include a revealing expose about the movie industry's film ratings board, has created yet another galvanizing call to action with The Invisible War.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    It's a nicely balanced blend of comedy, drama and athletic dancing that plies its trade with winking, unforced self-assurance.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Hope Springs is a minor miracle of a movie. Within a Hollywood tradition accustomed to treating sex as something titillating, taboo, gauzily idealized or downright pornographic, finally someone has made a movie that treats it in the riskiest way possible: as the physical expression of intimacy between two flawed but recognizable adults.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    With The Bourne Legacy, Gilroy has brought characteristic taste and skill to a nearly impossible task: embracing the past without completely erasing it, thereby creating an invitingly complicated and open-ended future.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Oslo, August 31st builds to an unforgettable climax, a bravura sequence that starts at a party, crawls through a variety of nightclubs and raves, and ends on a note of utterly surprising lyricism.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    With warmth, unsparing self-awareness and that ineffable Everyman appeal sometimes called "relatability," Birbiglia proves to be as engaging a presence on the screen as he has been all these years onstage and over the radio waves.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    There are few cinematic pleasures as satisfying to behold as an actor in a role that fits him like a Savile Row suit. Richard Gere offers just such gratification in Arbitrage, a silky, sophisticated Wall Street thriller that finds the actor utterly in his prime, wearing his age and accumulated emotional wisdom with warmth, charisma and nonstop appeal.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    A whimsical, sad, diverting and altogether delightful exploration of how cinema can benefit, not only from glancing back at its own past, but by staying open to parallel forms of presentation and play.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    That Detropia won't be just another well-reported urban obituary is clear from the film's arresting opening moments.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Beauty Is Embarrassing stays true to White's own exacting standards: It's thoughtful, skillfully executed and pure pop pleasure, from start to finish.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Just in time for the holiday travel season, Flight brings audiences perhaps the most harrowing scenes of a troubled airplane ever committed to film.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    From the first smoky notes of a theme song sung by Adele, it's clear that Skyfall will be both classic and of-the-moment.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    But even appreciated simply as a little-known chapter of European history, it proves consistently engrossing, edifying and affecting.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Life of Pi is spellbinding while it lasts. Lee's film can be appreciated as many things -- a post-Darwinian meditation on coexistence as the key to survival, a reflection on the spiritual nature of suffering and transcendence, a beguiling bait-and-switch on the vagaries of belief itself.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    In the vein of such recent classics as "The Lives of Others" and "4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days," Christian Petzold's Barbara re-visits the quiet, everyday tragedies of the Iron Curtain era, when paranoia ran deep and for very good reasons.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    West of Memphis makes a lucid, absorbing contribution to an epic saga that Berlinger and Sinofsky first wrestled into an 18-year-long narrative that changed two lives and saved one. And it gives that epic an ending that's happy, sad, inspiring, infuriating, right and terribly wrong, all at the same time.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Smoothly navigating the perilous line between insufferably twee and heartbreakingly grim, Quartet is a subtle, sure-footed delight.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    No
    No isn’t nearly as definitive or declarative as its title: It leaves viewers wondering whether they should cheer, shrug or shake their heads.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    The filmmaker’s dedication to non-judgment occasionally militates against narrative drive: Beyond the Hills begins to sag in its middle sequences, when the repetitive monotony of Alina’s outbursts begins to yield diminishing returns. But he has made a film that’s worth even those wearying sequence.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Suffused with enormous compassion for the young woman at its center, this parable of awakenings shares some DNA with the art house hit “An Education” but has little of that movie’s nods to cozy humor and happy endings.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    42
    Harrison plays Rickey with a jutting jaw, squinting eye and hoarse bark straight out of the Irascible Old Coot playbook, his character constantly invoking God and the almighty dollar to justify what became known as Rickey’s “noble experiment.”
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    The casting coup here is Benedict Cumberbatch, who exudes steely resolve and silken savagery as a villain on the cusp of becoming a legendary nemesis.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Primarily, What Maisie Knew is a showcase for consistently superb performances that, while utterly grounded in their characters, succeed in keeping viewers off-balance as to who will do what, and when.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Like a seductively lambent hall of mirrors, The Bling Ring lays bare the venality of train-wreck celebrity culture, striving and self-deception by dramatizing a fact that’s as delicious as it is depressing.