For 442 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Chuck Wilson's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 54
Highest review score: 100 Sol LeWitt
Lowest review score: 0 Lower Learning
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 78 out of 442
442 movie reviews
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Chuck Wilson
    Has surprising depth and charm, descriptors never before ascribed to a movie starring Ashton Kutcher.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 70 Chuck Wilson
    The filmmaking is actually quite polished, and Ribisi is fascinating to watch -- his fluttery weirdness has never seemed more grounded and resonant, turning Gray's self-destructive egoism into near tragedy.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Chuck Wilson
    The Summit is at its most powerful when the filmmakers simply tell the tale, which gradually develops the unsettling suspense of a horror movie, with K2 cast as the implacable killer.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Chuck Wilson
    Audiences are destined to debate the film's final scenes, where Hanley piles on plot twists, leading to a coda that turns a creepily ambiguous story about God and the terrifying power of paternal love into something closer to an X-File.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 60 Chuck Wilson
    Mercifully free of excess mania, sexual innuendo and fart jokes, this sweet-natured comedy, ably directed by John Whitesell (Malibu's Most Wanted), has some nice bits of business.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Chuck Wilson
    Peterson and her longtime writing partner, John Paragon, as well as director Sam Irvin, clearly worship the Poe-inspired Roger Corman/Vincent Price films of the 1960s, so of course there’s a pit and a pendulum in that dungeon, but who’d have expected it to be so beautifully designed?
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Chuck Wilson
    The road-trip drama Who's Driving Doug is earnest but not overly sweet — a blessing for a film with built-in sentimentality traps.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Chuck Wilson
    Though engaging from beginning to end, be warned that this is also harrowing, utterly depressing stuff.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Chuck Wilson
    [A] slow-moving yet soulful documentary.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Chuck Wilson
    Clichéd though it may be, this movie was clearly made with love.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 60 Chuck Wilson
    West delivers the emotional goods when tragedy strikes in the final reel. If 17-year-old pop star Moore isn't a skilled actress, she's at least unassuming.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Chuck Wilson
    Despite the success of these action sequences, Annaud and his ultraserious cast are so determined (admirably) to keep war from seeming romantic that we are never quite pulled into the movie.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Chuck Wilson
    You can be sure that his victims die shirtless, and are as dumb as the hetero dimwits who fell prey to Jason or Freddy, but what you might not expect is that this queer-slanted slasher flick is actually pretty good.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Chuck Wilson
    With a dream cast that also includes Patricia Clarkson and, in a cameo, a tattooed George Clooney, fullness of narrative may not have struck the filmmakers as key, and their film feels slight, as if it were an extended short, albeit one made by the smartest kids in class.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 60 Chuck Wilson
    Although, in the end, this is basically just a moss-strewn remake of his 1997 hit, "I Know What You Did Last Summer," director Jim Gillespie appears invigorated, sending his capable young cast into a series of nicely staged suspense sequences.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Chuck Wilson
    Formulaic but refreshingly low-key weepie.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Chuck Wilson
    The Story of Luke is a charming little film in need of a bit more grit.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Chuck Wilson
    Saving Shiloh takes place in 2005, but in its setting and sensibility, it feels like 1930s Walton's Mountain.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 60 Chuck Wilson
    Dark House is one nutty horror movie, but what's crazier still is how well it works — until it doesn't.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Chuck Wilson
    Dead Before Dawn's best jokes are grounded in the warm, believable camaraderie between Casper and his friends, but Mullen is less confident with crowds. The zemon-horde attack scenes are a visual jumble.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 60 Chuck Wilson
    Kirk Douglas turns 83 this very week, and surely the fact that he's pulled a rabbit out of the hat at this late date deserves a deep bow.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Chuck Wilson
    Vardalos is a pleasing mix of Elaine May and Bonnie Hunt; in other words, she's not a sex kitten, but she's funny and smart.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Chuck Wilson
    Hellion offers Paul his most adult screen role so far, and he's very fine, but the movie belongs to Wiggins, a newcomer whose innate gifts are a perfect echo of Paul's.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Chuck Wilson
    If the screenwriters never satisfactorily reconcile these charming misfits with the unsettling fact that they're also bomb planters, albeit clumsy ones, they make up for it with smart, character-driven dialogue that's brought to life by an equally sharp ensemble.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Chuck Wilson
    Mitchell's unwillingness to define the parameters of the specter haunting Jay leads to a finale that's muddled and confusing, and definitely not scary.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Chuck Wilson
    [An] uneven but intriguing found-footage horror flick.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Chuck Wilson
    A well-made but emotionally scattered film whose hero gives his heart only to the dog.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Chuck Wilson
    [Webber's] performance is crazy good, and so emotionally charged that viewers may be forgiving of a finale overloaded with silly twists.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Chuck Wilson
    Never-hilarious but often-quite-amusing film.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Chuck Wilson
    Marshall isn't exactly a cinematic poet, but he does a fine job delineating each individual dog's personality, as well as the shifting hierarchy of power within the pack, which is why it's so exasperating that he and first-time screenwriter Dave Digillo are forever cutting away to dull Jerry and his stateside quest for rescue-mission funds.

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