For 777 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 46% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Dana Stevens' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 A Mighty Wind
Lowest review score: 0 State Property
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 99 out of 777
777 movie reviews
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Reasonably good fun, even if, in the end, it's not really very interesting.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Shyamalan never gives us anything to believe in, other than his own power to solve problems of his own posing, and his command of a narrative logic is as circular -- and as empty -- as those bare patches out in the cornfield.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    The format and the purposeful blandness of the script make Jordan seem remote, more icon than human being.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    The most curious thing about this magical-realist fable...is how thin and soft it is, how unpersuasive and ultimately forgettable even its most strenuous inventions turn out to be.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    The glacierization of half of the world's inhabited land is contemplated with barely a hint of horror. In fact, it looks kind of cool.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Parsons himself might have written a surreal, funny-sad ballad about the aftermath of his own death, but Grand Theft Parsons is little more than a surreal anecdote, told in too much detail and without enough soul or imagination to make anything more than a footnote to a legend.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Polished and bouncy without being overly mawkish or unduly obnoxious. Above all, it is short.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    If Remember the Titans is corny, it's unabashedly, even generously so.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    The movie's atmosphere is, in many ways, more interesting than its story. Mr. Robbins and Ms. Morton are not the warmest actors. He can be mannered and smug, and she often seems to beam her performances from a strange, private mental universe.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Nobody in it seems organically connected to anybody else. In a movie devoted to the idea that everything and everyone is connected, this is a serious failing, and it undermines Mr. Sayles's noble intentions.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Its cheery inoffensiveness, though, is in some ways disappointing.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Clouds is about the dumbest intelligent movie I've ever seen.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    The main thing this "Assault" lacks is a point. Mr. Carpenter's film still resonates with the political paranoia and social unease of the era. Mr. Carpenter's cynical refusal to distinguish clearly between good guys and bad guys feels freshly unsettling, while Mr. Richet's "modernization" looks like something we've seen a hundred times before.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Tilda Swinton is the Angel Gabriel, adding a touch of high-class celestial cross-dressing to this overblown, overlong attempt - which falls just short of success - to make a movie dumber than "Van Helsing."
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    This movie is terribly silly, but it's not completely terrible.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    In the end, though, Robots is hollow and mechanical, an echo chamber of other movies and an awkward attempt to turn the intrinsically scary sensitive-robot theme into something heartwarming and cute.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    It is not saying much to point out that the sequel is better than its predecessor (directed by Abdul Malik Abbott), which was crude and amateurish in every way.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Madagascar arouses no sense of wonder, except insofar as you wonder, as you watch it, how so much talent, technical skill and money could add up to so little.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Compared with the psychological probing and spiritual brooding of "Batman Begins," Fantastic Four is proudly dumb, loud and inconsequential.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    It would help if the movie were actually funny - or if it actually bothered to be a movie, rather than some car chases punctuated by shots of Ms. Simpson sashaying toward the camera (or more often, away from it).
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    It's a movie best appreciated for the costumes, the sets and Ms. Theron's haughty athleticism.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Ms. Thurman is the one bit of genuine radiance in this aggressively and pointlessly shiny, noisy spectacle.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    The mostly unprofessional cast does a lot of shouting and swearing, and Mr. Henry's face has a haunting impassivity, but the film does not offer much in the way of social insight or credible emotion.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    In spite of some acute observations and a few interesting performances (most notably from John Malkovich as Jerome's drawing teacher and the ever-reliable Jim Broadbent as Strathmore's least illustrious alumnus), Art School Confidential is a dull and dyspeptic exercise in self-pity and hostility.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    The second half of the movie squanders suspense and momentum, solving its riddles by deflating them.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Inconsequential documentary.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    It is also possible that the problem lies not with Mr. Desplechin but with Ms. Phoenix. Her Esther is a fascinating mixture of passivity and ferocity, but it's not clear that she has the range to show both sides of the character.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    What limits The Guys -- what makes it an exercise in art therapy rather than a work of art -- is its decorous refusal to probe deeply into its characters, or to exploit any of the dramatic potential their accidental relationship might contain.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    (Fishburne's) performance here, witty and profane, vulnerable and strutting, nearly holds the movie together.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    A likable, featherweight romantic comedy that hardly asks to be taken seriously, but its very triviality is, in some ways, quite significant.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Permeated by a self-pitying, adolescent naïveté.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    The movie is quiet, modest and sympathetic almost to a fault; its scenes of emotional discord, accompanied by a swooning, sniffling score, seem best suited to cable television. It's like a Lifetime movie about men.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    A dreamy, impressionistic inquiry into the legacy of the 1960's, but it's less concerned with history than with mood.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Never quite comes to dramatic or comic life.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Some of it is, I'll admit, pretty funny.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Not a bad movie, and its intentions are unimpeachable. But its sentimentality is so relentless and its narrative so predictable that the life is very nearly squeezed out of it.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    The movie is full of scattershot gags and indifferent acting, but you get the feeling that it's bad on purpose, which makes it, given the number of teenage movies that are terrible by accident, not bad at all.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Sloppy when it should be incisive, indulgent when it should be astringent, and ultimately unsure of what it is mocking and in what spirit.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Ms. Depentes and Ms. Thi -- push such chic amoralism to its logical conclusion, composing a numbing alternation of pornographic scenarios and brutal killings. The result is like something you'd see momentarily unscrambled on a hotel television set, but with better music and a little more of a story line.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    As Passionada ambles toward a formulaic fairy-tale ending, it exudes such giddy self-assurance that you wish you could believe in it.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    With so much going for it, how could the movie be such a dud?
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Captures the true spirit of the holiday. It's mildly sentimental, unabashedly consumerist (with anything-but-subliminal advertisements for McDonald's hamburgers and Nestlé candy tucked inside), studiously inoffensive and completely disposable.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    The mystery of Enigma is how a rich historical subject, combined with so much first-rate talent -- a highly capable (if not always exciting) director, a fine English cast, a script by Tom Stoppard -- could have yielded such a flat, plodding picture.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Comedy, like marriage, takes more work than this.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    It's hard to watch these two actors plow through the nonsense of K- Pax without feeling that a terrific opportunity has been squandered.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    If Confidence was made by people who have seen too many movies, it seems to be aimed at people who have seen too few. It offers up stale lessons in vocabulary and technique, all of them easily gleaned on a trip to the video store, as if they were choice bits of inside knowledge.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Feels more like a grueling road trip in search of a family comedy.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    The proliferating subplots require many big emotional confrontations, so the movie seems to reach its climax 20 minutes in, and then every 15 minutes or so thereafter. This is fairly exhausting.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Supporting performances add comic spark to a movie that otherwise seems happily, deliberately second-rate.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    While it demonstrates some formal ingenuity, it is for the most part a tasteless and derivative stew of overdone jokes, chronological tricks and labored shock effects.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    The visual intensity and the relentless degradation visited on the characters begins to feel prurient and dishonest.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Laws of Attraction, like the somewhat better "Intolerable Cruelty," seems desperately unsure of itself at crucial moments.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    It is not really much of a movie at all, if by movie you mean a work of visual storytelling about the dramatic actions of a group of interesting characters.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Aiming for lighthearted, bittersweet charm, But Forever in My Mind slips into predictability and condescension.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Laborious and nonsensical psychological thriller, a mediocre piece of studio hackwork unredeemed by a first-rate director.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    It's so enamored of its own upbeat view of human nature that it expects you to overlook its stick-figure characters, its creaky plot machinery and its remorseless assault on your tear ducts.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    I object to A Dirty Shame not because it is offensive - to do so would be another way of congratulating Mr. Waters for his bogus daring - but because it is boring. Beyond offering a catalog of interesting practices and lampooning their dedicated practitioners, the movie has very little to say about sex.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Not entirely without charm.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Trudges along the well-trod path of high-minded, schematic storytelling.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Costner's relentless, root-canal humorlessness turns what might have been an enjoyable B-picture throwback into a ponderous drag.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Drags and meanders when it wants clarity and clockwork, and bogs down in hazy, vague emotions.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Laborious and logy when it should be madcap and effervescent.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Like a documentary version of "Fight Club," shorn of social insight, intellectual pretension and cinematic interest. It also offers a supremely literal-minded version of slapstick.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    There is very little that is tantalizing or suspenseful. The feeling of revelation is gone, and many of the teasing implications of "Reloaded" have been abandoned.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Would have worked brilliantly as a five-minute late-night comedy sketch, flogs its premise for nearly an hour and a half, generating too few laughs to justify the enterprise.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Like a bottle of lukewarm Champagne -- an expensive one, judging by the label -- America's Sweethearts opens with a promising burst of effervescence and quickly goes flat.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Any movie that makes you root against the underdog, though, is cause for suspicion, and Mr. Smith and Mr. Montana, perhaps aware of this, try belatedly to restore Mr. Duffy's status as a victim.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    This movie feels phony and slick, as if it were cooked up by Darrin's cynical ad agency, rather than at his aunt's stove down in Montecarlo.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Anyway, you will be glad that they have found each other, and eager to wish them a long and happy life together -- somewhere else, as 95 minutes in their company is plenty.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    The film's ridiculousness would not be so irksome if Mr. Shyamalan did not take his sleight of hand so seriously, if he did not insist on dressing this scary, silly, moderately clever fairy tale in a somber cloak of allegory.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    With its flashbacks, split-screen montages, decade-jumping soundtrack, sped-up action and frequent shifts of light and color, Wonderland feels like "Law & Order" on crack.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Dreamy touches can't compensate for the film's main flaw, which is that the relationship between the two main characters never really develops.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    On its own, apart from whatever beliefs a viewer might bring to it, The Passion of the Christ never provides a clear sense of what all of this bloodshed was for, an inconclusiveness that is Mr. Gibson's most serious artistic failure.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    It does manage to fire off a handful of decent jokes and a few sneaky insights before losing its nerve and collapsing into incoherence.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Sandler has a solid, fumbling likability, without which Spanglish would be not merely annoying but despicable in its slick complacency.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    With its studied nonchalance, Loners reaches neither the hilarity of an episode of "Friends" nor the ethnographic stickiness of "The Real World" on MTV.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    The simplicity of the tale becomes a bit tedious.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Broadly acted, clumsily written and directed with crude sincerity, it is a well-meaning feminist morality play unlikely to be of much interest outside the community in which it takes place.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    It's not bad enough to make you curse, but you are likely to laugh when you should scream, and to roll your eyes when you are meant to laugh.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    The human landscape of Palindromes is a vista of grotesqueness, dishonesty and creepiness. These are qualities Mr. Solondz has explored before, but this time he fails to make them interesting, partly because he lets himself and the audience off the hook.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    The burden of the story, which is maudlin and entirely unbelievable, weighs down even the more credible performances.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    Yes
    Yes is not just a movie, in other words, it's a poem. A bad poem. There is no denying Ms. Potter's skill at versifying - or for that matter, at composing clear, striking visual images - but her intricate, measured lines amount to doggerel, not art.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    A hectic, uninspired pastiche of catchphrases and clichés, with very little wit, inspiration or originality to bring its frantically moving images to genuine life.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    I suppose Rumor Has It could be worse, though at the moment I'm at a loss to say just how.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    A movie like this can survive an absurd premise but not incompetent execution. And Mr. LaBute, never much of an artist with the camera, proves almost comically inept as a horror-movie technician...It's neither haunting nor amusing; just boring.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    It might have been a satisfying if not terribly original piece of historical melodrama, but its clumsiness turns it, against its best intentions, into half-baked operatic kitsch.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    Seems both overplotted and underimagined, though there is at least some creativity and a dose of realism, evident in the hairstyles themselves.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    Like a ham-fisted high-concept public service announcement, directed with stagy deliberateness and written with tin-eared vernacular speechiness.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Gianvito's approach cannot really be called critical, since criticism would require some cogent analysis of causes and events.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    The best thing that can be said about Boys and Girls is that it is studiously inoffensive.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    Emotionally incoherent.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    Plays every convention twice, once as parody and once by the book, but the movie, trying to be two things at once, fails at both.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    Works hard at being charming, but comedy is best when it looks effortless.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    Clearly, this is an affair to forget.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    May have had the unintended effect of obscuring the original it meant to honor.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Jones, who recently starred in "Zig-Zag," a similarly striving, overwrought picture, is a disciplined and likable performer, and he bravely perseveres in the face of narrative absurdity and rampant overacting.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    This movie, a chaotic caper film at heart, wrecks its comic tone with some moments of gruesome violence.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    The very confusion that has made him (Rock) so unpredictable and funny onstage makes this on-screen exploration of contemporary racial mythologies curiously tentative and unfocused.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    Exists in a realm beyond sense, and induces in the viewer a trancelike state, leaving the mind free to ponder the mysteries of the universe.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    Having established its premise and set in motion an overloaded plot, the picture lurches this way and that, evoking more restlessness than laughter and more boredom than pathos.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    Before Civil Brand erupts into over-the-top melodrama (which is pretty early), it shows some interest in its characters, and in its less screechy moments the dialogue has the rough, bantering ring of actual speech.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    The relentless upbeatness of Life or Something Like It wrecks the possibility of either real laughter or genuine pathos.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    It's like watching two superbly conditioned rowers try to race a boat made of folded newspaper. Hard as they work, they just can't make it go any faster.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    I don't know how much The Score cost, but it's pretty close to worthless.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    The end titles and the ones that introduce Veronica Guerin...are the most informative parts of the film, and also the most powerful. What comes between them is a flat-footed, overwrought crusader-against-evil melodrama, in which Ms. Blanchett's formidable gifts as an actress are reduced to a haircut and an accent.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    Has some funny, dirty-minded jokes, a few amusing cameos (including Julianne Moore in clown makeup) and a soundtrack loaded with juicy cuts of mid-70's vintage soul and funk.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    Even fans of open-wheel racing, the high-speed, high-stress pastime that is the subject of Renny Harlin's hectic new film, may walk away from it more logy than exhilarated.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    Imagine "Last Tango in Paris" remade as a wan, low-budget romantic comedy.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    A howlingly silly, moderately diverting exercise in high, pointless style.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    Unfortunately, the movie's real setting is a sentimental fantasy world, and its story is a spectacularly incoherent exercise in geopolitical wish fulfillment.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    Offers a view of pornography that is nonjudgmental, even celebratory, but at the same time its premise -- that Danielle must be rescued from the shame and degradation of her old job -- suggests a more traditional, disapproving point of view. Instead of addressing this contradiction, the movie is happy to wallow in it, which would be fine if it had any real pleasure to offer.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    Its lack of subtlety is clearly a point of pride, and Mr. Hensleigh's flat-footed, hard-punching style has a blunt ferocity that makes "Kill Bill" look like "In the Bedroom."
    • 32 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    An unholy, incoherent mess.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    Proves to be both too much and not enough: yet another slick, empty package of ersatz entertainment.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    This is a time-tested movie con, but rarely has it been deployed so contemptibly.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    The problem, as it is so often in well-intentioned movies of this kind, is that rather than illuminate the enormity of Nazism, The Aryan Couple trades upon our knowledge of it for emotional impact.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    The only thing missing is a coherent story -- or even, for that matter, an interesting idea for one.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    Proves that a movie about goodness is not the same thing as a good movie.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    The real question raised by The United States of Leland is not why, but how. How, that is, did so many talented actors find their way to this dreary and derivative study in suburban dysfunction?
    • 40 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    Lord Lloyd Webber's thorough acquaintance with the canon of 18th- and 19th-century classical music is not in doubt, but his attempt to force a marriage between that tradition and modern musical theater represents a victory of pseudo-populist grandiosity over taste - an act of cultural butchery akin to turning an aviary of graceful swans and brilliant peacocks into an order of Chicken McNuggets.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 30 Dana Stevens
    Suffers from a fatal lack of modulation. It paints a picture of inner-city life as an endless sequence of beatings and shouting matches, and in its glum cartoonishness insults the people whose strivings it means to honor.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 20 Dana Stevens
    This picture achieves a level of badness that is its own form of sublimity. You almost - please note that I said almost - have to see it to believe it.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 20 Dana Stevens
    The latest bit of damaged goods offered up in the Miramax clearance sale, Underclassman plays like the longest episode of "21 Jump Street" ever made.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 20 Dana Stevens
    This is bad cinema and bad history. Ms. Bravo is unstinting in her praise for the omelet and her admiration of the chef, but she refuses to admit that she's walking on eggshells.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 20 Dana Stevens
    Brain-dead.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 20 Dana Stevens
    This violent meatball western deserves to be forgotten quickly.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 20 Dana Stevens
    Vacillates between cutesy Disney-style anthropomorphism and "Born Free" exoticism.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 20 Dana Stevens
    Instead of suspense, there is confusion; instead of intrigue, a lot of inexplicable confrontation among characters whose significance is not so much enigmatic as obscure.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 20 Dana Stevens
    The movie version overflows with affection and good intention, but unwittingly turns a bauble of cheerful fakery into something that mostly feels phony.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 20 Dana Stevens
    A listless and desultory affair.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 20 Dana Stevens
    Jettisoning any ambition toward thrillerhood, Domestic Disturbance becomes a plodding, obvious angry-dad melodrama, ambling toward the final, fatal showdown between parent and usurper.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 20 Dana Stevens
    The aesthetic of Full Frontal is as rough and grainy as the off-the-rack digital video in which much of it was shot.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 20 Dana Stevens
    The Glass House is hardly insane, just absurd, and the only damage it does is to itself.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 20 Dana Stevens
    Succumbs to its blockbuster ambitions and turns into a noisy, bloated mess.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 20 Dana Stevens
    In the end, Loser disappoints.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 20 Dana Stevens
    Shot in smeary video, it sports the static, by-the-book camera work of a daytime soap-opera.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 20 Dana Stevens
    What should be a soufflé of gender-bending mischief is more like a bowl of oatmeal.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 20 Dana Stevens
    Confuses an empty and derivative stylistic bravura with formal cleverness, and a sterile, mechanistic sensationalism with emotional intensity.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 20 Dana Stevens
    The ending is meant to be clouded with ambiguity, but really it is unequivocally happy because it means the movie is over.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 20 Dana Stevens
    The film's last half-hour -- or do I mean its final two weeks? -- is meant to keep the audience sniffling and sobbing uncontrollably, but the only thing likely to elicit tears is the sight of Mr. Reeves dressed in a white dinner jacket crooning "Time After Time."
    • 32 Metascore
    • 20 Dana Stevens
    Completed before the release of "American Beauty," this contrived, puffed up little picture nonetheless seems like a ripoff, perhaps because it mines the same tired assumptions and unexamined stereotypes about suburban family life.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 20 Dana Stevens
    The movie is bulky and inarticulate, leaving behind a trail of wreckage and incoherence.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 20 Dana Stevens
    In a culture apparently defined by lap dancing, ersatz architectural sublimity and the virtual contact of cyberspace, how do we know what is real? The Center of the World, for example, is as phony as can be.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 20 Dana Stevens
    Buried in the slow, talky, inanities that the two stars exchange are some potentially interesting ideas about female sexual self-assertion and male surrender, but neither the actors nor the filmmakers have any notion about how to explore them.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 20 Dana Stevens
    Does occasionally rise out of the sewer of its self-imposed idiocy, ascending in brief moments from utter witlessness to half-witlessness, mostly thanks to the loose comic byplay between Mr. Black and Mr. Zahn.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 20 Dana Stevens
    The delicate magic of, for instance, Hayao Miyazaki's "Spirited Away," which Disney released earlier this fall, is absent from this brainless, mechanical picture.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 20 Dana Stevens
    Unfortunately, all of these supremely expressive vehicles come equipped with drivers, principally a pair of crash-test dummies played by Paul Walker and Tyrese, whose low-gear dialogue makes the whine of engines sound like the highest poetry.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 20 Dana Stevens
    A vulgar, uninspired lump of poisoned eye candy.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 20 Dana Stevens
    That Garfield speaks in the supercilious, world-weary drawl of Bill Murray is some small consolation, as are a few of the animal tricks.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 20 Dana Stevens
    A patchwork of contrived naughtiness and forced pathos...The loose ends are neatly tied up, as they are when you seal a bag of garbage -- or if you prefer, rubbish.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 20 Dana Stevens
    There is no credible feeling here, no comedy, no eroticism.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 20 Dana Stevens
    "Ouch!" is also what you might exclaim as you pinch yourself to stay awake through the film's slow, labored contrivances.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 20 Dana Stevens
    The director has fallen into the common first-timer's trap of biting off more than he can chew, stitching together an unwieldy, disorganized story out of subplots and flashbacks, without paying enough attention to the basic requirements of character and narrative.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 10 Dana Stevens
    Has nothing on its mind besides the squirming discomfort of its audience, the achievement of which it holds up as a brave political accomplishment.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 10 Dana Stevens
    The story is laughably incoherent, which would be less bothersome if the movie were not also so unremittingly pretentious.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 10 Dana Stevens
    By the end of The Watcher you'll need your own prescription.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 10 Dana Stevens
    By the end, even the irrepressible Mr. Foxx seems tired and defeated, and we can only hope he perks up in time for his next movie.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 10 Dana Stevens
    Just as the vast, square Imax screen magnifies panda-haunches and steep, jungle-clad gorges, its relentless scale also enlarges a half-baked, mediocre little adventure story into something almost grotesquely bad.
    • 13 Metascore
    • 10 Dana Stevens
    Extremely good-looking people tend to be shallow, self-involved and not very bright. Let's call this statement what it is: a form of prejudice, a stereotype. It is, sadly, a stereotype that Down to You does everything in its power to promote.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 10 Dana Stevens
    Not only is it excruciatingly boring -- but its central premises are so banal and dubious as to border on offensiveness.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 10 Dana Stevens
    Chandler's script has, by my count, exactly one sort-of-funny line and not a single scene whose comic possibilities are successfully exploited.
    • 14 Metascore
    • 10 Dana Stevens
    Take this as a warning: it's not much fun.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 10 Dana Stevens
    It's instructive to compare Bully with Jean-Pierre Ameris's "Bad Company," which tackles similar themes and manages to be explicit without stooping to cheap salaciousness. It's a genuinely disturbing film. Bully, in contrast, is merely disgusting.
    • 14 Metascore
    • 10 Dana Stevens
    So poorly written, badly acted and ineptly directed that it denies you even the modest pleasure of making fun of it.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 10 Dana Stevens
    Snow Dogs is, even by the standards of a tradition that includes "Son of Flubber" and "The Shaggy D.A.," remarkably inept.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 10 Dana Stevens
    Both grueling and dull. Imagine (if possible) a Pasolini film without passion or politics, or an Almodóvar movie without beauty or humor, and you have some idea of the glum, numb experience of watching O Fantasma.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 10 Dana Stevens
    As the movie dragged on, I thought I heard a mysterious voice, and felt myself powerfully drawn toward the light -- the light of the exit sign. I have returned from the beyond to warn you: this movie is 90 minutes long, and life is too short.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 10 Dana Stevens
    Lacks the wit to do anything new and instead recycles tired jokes and attitudes.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 10 Dana Stevens
    Endure the long, slow, unraveling of this movie, which can't even muster the intelligence to be pretentious or the bravado to be amusingly bad.
    • 16 Metascore
    • 10 Dana Stevens
    What better to do with such a quiet, majestic landscape than to liven it up with the noise and vulgarity of lowest-common-denominator American pop culture?
    • 23 Metascore
    • 10 Dana Stevens
    A witless, gruesome barrage of jokey violence and lame trans-Atlantic humor, kept moving by the pointless, derivative kineticism of Mr. Yu's hyperactive cuts and splices.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 10 Dana Stevens
    As five or six bad movies squished together, it almost seems like a bargain.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 10 Dana Stevens
    Bad and tasteless. You laugh neither with it nor at it but rather sit counting the minutes while the movie laughs, for no good reason, at itself.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 10 Dana Stevens
    The whole business has a breathless, determined, student-film quality that makes it especially hard to watch. Mr. Cunningham and his cast are clearly trying to do something they feel is important, and there is no pleasure in watching them do it so ineptly.
    • 14 Metascore
    • 10 Dana Stevens
    The story is so crowded with incident and implication as to be both nonsensical and impossible to act, so the actors, when they are not bursting into fits of temper, smile mysteriously.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 0 Dana Stevens
    A film that even a rabid lowbrow like Homer Simpson (or, when the mood strikes, this critic) would find beneath his dignity.
    • 9 Metascore
    • 0 Dana Stevens
    At the end the picture seems to acknowledge its own ludicrousness, but by then it, like Beans, is beyond rescue.