For 1,094 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Dana Stevens' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Force Majeure
Lowest review score: 0 I'm Still Here
Score distribution:
1,094 movie reviews
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    A near-perfect piece of popular entertainment, a children's classic.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    If nothing else, it's an eye-boggling two hours at the movies and a must for Swinton completists fascinated by her recent turn toward operatic roles in odd, unmarketable films like this one and last year's Julia. She's becoming the Maria Callas of international cinema.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Russell has always excelled at finding new ways to use familiar actors, and every performance in The Fighter is noteworthy if not outstanding.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    The first hour and half or so of True Grit is as good as anything the Coens have ever done-a sweeping Western that, like John Ford's best films, exposes the cracks in American myths of frontier justice and self-reliance.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Williams plays this tired, disillusioned, chronically angry woman without a trace of actorly vanity. It's a performance noteworthy not just for its intensity but for Williams' ability to communicate inner experience at a micro-level of detail.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    The middle section of the film, in which we follow Jack's childhood in a series of fragmented memories from birth until about the age of 12, is as astonishingly precise a rendering of the way the world looks to a child as I've seen on film.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    I'll be forever grateful to this movie for introducing me to Nim's story, a tale so powerful and suggestive that it functions as a myth about the ever-mysterious relationship between human beings and animals.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    May be the most necessary film you'll see this year. But if you go to the movies in search of emotion rather than edification, don't let that word necessary deter you, because this is also one of the most engaging films you'll see this year, full of vibrant, complex real-life characters whose troubles and joys will stay with you long after the movie's done.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    It's Schoenaerts' magisterial presence that carries the film. In between bursts of convincingly horrific violence (including a fight in an elevator that makes Ryan Gosling's in "Drive" look like a schoolyard tiff), Schoenaerts also shows himself capable of moments of great subtlety and delicacy.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Easy Money's big heist scene is the only action set piece so far this year that was so suspenseful I could feel my heartbeat in my ears.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Still, for me, Wuthering Heights' almost impersonal immersion in the light and texture and sound of the moors was the source of its vividness and necessity. In order for the art of literary adaptation to remain vital, we have to be willing to let directors throw aside the book and film their dream of it.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    It's only at the very beginning and the very end that Zero Dark Thirty functions (brilliantly) as a ripped-from-the-headlines political thriller. Much of the rest of the time, it's a workplace drama about a woman so good at her job that most of her colleagues think she's crazy.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    No
    It’s the rare political satire that can sound the depths of irony as No does and still end on a note of ambivalent hope.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Though Sweetgrass has moments of great beauty, the film is never nostalgic or idealizing about its human or ovine subjects. It shows the relationship of human and domesticated animal—and the relationship of both to nature—as a productive and symbiotic yet often brutal struggle.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    It’s a stunningly assured debut, a slyly subversive delight, and one of my favorite movies of the year so far.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    It’s the unhappiest happy ending I’ve ever seen, a moment that makes you weep not just for this one man who found his way back to freedom, but for all those men and women who never knew it in the first place.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    I’ve always admired this director’s commitment to both seriousness and laughter, to showing the beauty and significance of ordinary human life side by side with its petty, venal absurdity.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Despite its atmosphere of failure and melancholy, Inside Llewyn Davis is ultimately a dark valentine to both its hero and his milieu.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Her
    It’s a wistful portrait of our current love affair with technology in all its promise and disappointment, a post-human "Annie Hall."
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Even if you couldn’t care less about jazz drumming, though, Whiplash is a thrill to watch. Underneath that taut, stylish surface, it’s really a movie about the perils of pedagogy, about the relationship between a passionate (perhaps too passionate) student and a demanding (perhaps too demanding) teacher. Which is to say, a movie about a uniquely powerful and potentially destructive form of love.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    The movie is at its best when Moodysson... lets his three rebellious heroines simply exist and interact as the overgrown children the actresses still are, collapsing in laughter during a cafeteria food fight or negotiating their first stiff flirtations with a like-minded group of punk-rock-loving boys.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Snowpiercer is its own strange, special thing, a movie that seems to have been sent back to us from some distant alternate future where grandiose summer action movies can also be lovingly crafted, thematically ambitious works of art.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Rather than assaulting you with self-congratulatory tears, it leaves you with a bittersweet glow of wisdom and an appreciation of the small triumphs and difficult labors of love.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    In its own modest, genial terms, the picture succeeds: it never wants to be more than charming and sweet, and it invites us to imagine London as a cozy, happy small town where coincidental encounters are everyday occurrences.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Outrageous fun.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Like the best war movies -- and like martial literature going back to the Iliad -- it balances the dreadful, unassuageable cruelty of warfare and the valor and decency of those who fight.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The movie's sexual politics are as contrived as its plot, which veers off into one of the surprise endings of which Mr. Altman is so fond.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The movie belongs to Ms. Rodriguez. With her slightly crooked nose and her glum, sensual mouth, she looks a little like Marlon Brando in his smoldering prime, and she has some of his slow, intense physicality. She doesn't so much transcend gender as redefine it.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Mantegna, who as an actor is one of the leading interpreters of Mr. Mamet's work, gives generous room to the movie's first-rate ensemble.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Wargnier's sumptuous, moving new film, captures both the hope of the returning Russians and their brutal betrayal.

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