For 163 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 57% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 37% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Dave Calhoun's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 London Road
Lowest review score: 20 Only God Forgives
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 92 out of 163
  2. Negative: 2 out of 163
163 movie reviews
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    It’s enthralling and haunting.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    It’s a bold, beautiful cosmic adventure story with a touch of the surreal and the dreamlike, and yet it always feels grounded in its own deadly serious reality.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    It’s not a despairing movie – Mungiu even suggests that a new generation might put things right – but it’s a brutally honest one.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    Alongside archive material and new footage of Chet shot in his signature romantic, B&W style, Weber elicits frank reminiscences from his subject and a host of ex-lovers and friends.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    The film conceals as much as it reveals, and its beauty is that it pretends to do nothing else. It embraces a mystery and protects it, and it’s thrilling to behold.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    It’s both soaringly romantic and truly sad.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    What’s most winning about ‘The Club’ is how Larrain manages to allude to the wider structures, behaviour and corruption of the church without ever making this claustrophobic, moody and very local story feel anything but crucial, thrilling and disturbing.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    Gestures, looks and touches carry enormous weight, and Blanchett and Mara, both excellent, invite micropscopic readings of their every glance and movement.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    It’s an exploration of all things surface, yes, but it has soul too.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    It’s an intoxicating marvel, strange and sublime: it combines sci-fi ideas, gloriously unusual special effects and a sharp atmosphere of horror.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    The Coens have given us a melancholic, sometimes cruel, often hilarious counterfactual version of music history. It's a what-if imagining of a cultural also-ran that maybe tells us more about the truth than the facts themselves ever could.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    It’s a film of small moments and tiny gestures that leaves a very, very big impression.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    It’s a more subtle, damning film for implicating the media – as much as the church, the courts, the legal profession and other Boston institutions – in the systematic, wider cultural cover-up it describes.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    As ever with Leigh, Mr Turner addresses the big questions with small moments. It's an extraordinary film, all at once strange, entertaining, thoughtful and exciting.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    It’s a joyous film, full of love and warmth but unafraid to admit that with sticking out your neck comes struggle and sorrow. Truly lovely.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    From this simple, not especially unique love story, Kechiche has fashioned an intimate epic.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    Most importantly, the film involves us: it draws us into the debate, makes us complicit, demands that we have an opinion, and then upends that same opinion a few minutes later. It's engaging and rousing.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    Everything about this film makes you look with fresh eyes at the familiar.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Hull clearly had a profound and lucid response to his blindness, and this thoughtful, illuminating film goes some way to inhabiting his thoughts.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Flaws aside, this is a superior, inventive kids' film, and one that's bound to make Rylance's giant a favourite with younger audiences.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Rohrwacher draws us into this unusual world with the ease of someone who knows exactly what they’re talking about, neither judging nor celebrating and, at her best, just looking with tenderness and a winning sense of humour.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    In what is surely his finest hour, Tom Hardy plays both brothers. Much more than a gimmick, it’s like watching one side of a mind wrestle with the other – literally, in one explosive, fun-to-unpick fight scene.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Scarecrow’ feels like an existential fairytale squarely rooted in the reality of America’s fraying backroads and small towns. It’s all a little rambling and anarchic, but later scenes in a jail have real bite. And when the sadness behind Lion’s smile is revealed, it’s also genuinely moving.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    A stop-gap tale that’s modest, fun and briefly amusing rather than one that breaks new ground or offers hugely memorable set pieces.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    It's a terrifically moving film that has a fitting earthbound feel to it.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    This is a simple, sweet tale about the basic pleasures of home and hearth, rendered unflashily in a delightful style of hand-drawn animation that employs a beautiful array of warm pastel colours.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Pan
    This Pan is loud, colourful, busy and full of ideas. Not all those ideas work in sync – but most are bold and some are winningly eccentric.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    The original footage – devastatingly intimate; familiar yet alien – still stops us in our tracks more than six decades later.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    As a storyteller, Farr is bold enough to keep us guessing until the film’s final moments, but a late need to explain lets the film down a little.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    It's an endearingly loopy, occasionally half-cooked but always ambitious film.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    The Program offers no obvious new revelations and Armstrong remains elusive – but it has an unsettling air that carries us through its more pedestrian patches.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Timoner refuses to run fully with Brand’s elevated idea of himself, preferring to offer glimpses of a vulnerability and ruthlessness behind the clownish bluster.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    It’s not a happy watch – but it’s an essential one if you want better to understand the city and people around you.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    It’s not all doom, gloom and personal disasters — the film also offers lucid insights on the links between the man and his movies.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    It's a heady brew, awkwardly told, but smartly provocative.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Citizenfour is at its most eye-opening and essential simply as a portrait of the then 29-year-old Snowden at a point of absolute no-return in his life as he spends almost a week hiding out in Hong Kong before disappearing into an entirely new existence.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    This is a whale of a movie, grotesque and a little bloated but impossible to ignore. Its power and its horrors sneak up on you.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    We’re never far from Von Trier, and both Skarsgård and Gainsbourg appear to offer different versions of the author himself.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    The Assassin is a beautiful, beguiling film; it's impossible not to get fully lost in its rarefied world.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Catch Me Daddy feels authentic and informed, but wears its research lightly and prefers to thrust us into the atmosphere of the moment rather than offer too much background or tie things up neatly.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Full of Anderson’s visual signatures – cameras that swerve, quick zooms, speedy montages – it’s familiar in style, refreshing in tone and one of Anderson’s very best films.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    There’s plenty of flesh (much of it belonging to porn doubles), although the film is rarely, if ever, what most people would call erotic or pornographic. It’s neither deeply serious nor totally insincere; hovering somewhere between the two, it creates its own mesmerising power.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    The Invisible Woman is only partly a romance; it’s the tragedy of Nelly’s life that makes itself more powerfully heard.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    It’s charmingly simple. But it also offers a sharp modern spin on Michael Bond’s London-set stories without being cynical.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    It’s not a pretty story, but its warmth lies in its fondness – love, even – for the two boys at its heart.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Its various riffs on codes, whether moral, sexual, societal or German, are plain to see rather than enigmatic or enlightening. Luckily it’s all anchored in a storming performance from Cumberbatch: you’ll be deciphering his work long after the credits roll.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    It’s no masterpiece, but it’s slick and tense, and the camerawork has something of the in-the-moment, on-the-ground immediacy of the French New Wave films.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    An intimate, warm embrace of a film, it radiates joy and harmony despite playing out entirely in the shadow of a difficult father's death.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Baldwin and Toback make a snappy comic duo, and half of their talks with a line-up of luminaries focus on the art of filmmaking rather than the business.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    When the film gets outdoors, it soars, and Ceylan continues to dig with acute intelligence into the dark corners of everyday human behaviour.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    As the actors move fluidly between various states, shedding one skin while assuming another, Polanski makes this subversive parlour game matter.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Politics and entertainment are never an easy mix, and Jimmy’s Hall is a familiar, slightly unsurprising coming together of the two from Loach and his writer Paul Laverty. Sometimes you can see the joins, but there’s also great warmth, charm and humour among the ideas, and the sense of time and place is especially strong.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    In the end, the characters are more lasting than the story, which is a standard save-the-city-from-destruction yarn. But this crew is a riot, and their world is intriguing and even a little meaningful.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Director and co-writer Diego Quemada-Díez condenses many acute observations about life as an emigrant into a sure-footed, credible story.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Tale of Tales might lack magic in the immediate, flashy sense, but its strange spell is altogether seductive and special.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    It might be familiar territory for Almodóvar, but only a master of his art could make it look so easy.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    This is a portrait of cycles and change. But the mood of the film suggests that we should be impressed that this ever-growing, ever-changing city of ours is still chasing after new versions of the modern.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    If Heli lacks enough focus and thematic clarity to make it properly special, it's still winningly provocative and always compelling.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    The film’s pleasures are simple – soaring landscapes, old-school DIY adventure and some sweet performances by the child actors. It makes for a charmingly old-fashioned family adventure.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Amy
    Anyone with a beating heart will be forgiven for allowing it to break during this unflinching and thoughtful account of the life and death of the soul singer Amy Winehouse.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    U.N.C.L.E. has enough style and smarts to make it an amusingly louche summer movie: a cultivated mix of action and wit, suits and cities, that feels refreshingly analogue in a digital world.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    The film's quietly angry plea is for compassion, understanding and more than one eye open on this modern horror.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    With Dolan, you feel you're in the company of a truly original voice and one unafraid to make his mistakes right up there on the screen.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    What makes this more than just a punishing, fearful, expertly crafted thriller focused on one man’s endurance is heavily down to Emmanuel Lubezki’s attractive, thoughtful photography.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Hogg displays a welcome desire to draw on global film influences and ignore the unwritten rules of what British cinema should or should not seek to achieve, especially in the realm of films about the monied and unsympathetic.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Exhibition succeeds in making us feel deeply uncomfortable for peering into other people’s lives.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Writer-director Anna Muylaert’s observations on family relations and invisible-but-firm class barriers are always acute.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Archipelago confirms Hogg as a daring and mischievous artist, and a major British talent whose next move will be intriguing.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    A masterclass in how the most local, most hemmed-in stories can reverberate with the power of big, universal themes.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Brand is a winning – cuddly even – bridge between his film’s ideology and the wider world.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    More than ever Payne allows the humour to rise up gently from his story rather than burst through it.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    ‘Childhood’ is not always a subtle film, and some of the writing and acting feel like a bit of a slog. But its very spooky mood leaves a strong impression.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    The film is not without its problems – Michelle Williams is an elusive lead, and a wide array of characters come at the expense of depth – but it’s a knotty, thoughtful piece of work nonetheless.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Dunst handles her sidekick role with a mature ease that’s new to her, but it’s the men you remember: Mortensen in psychological freefall and Isaac always tough to read and hiding something behind a handsome, controlled exterior. It’s a gentle and smart blast from the past.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Kormákur creates such a convincing world – the craft of this film is astonishing – that you’re willing to forgive its less delicate touches in favour of its totally compelling depiction of what it must be like to ascend into a place that’s heaven one moment and hell the very next.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Once you get past some bumps in the road of believability, Our Kind of Traitor turns into a brisk, energetic drama, with Anthony Dod Mantle’s photography adding interesting layers to a fairly straightforward plot.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    This punky adaptation of Irvine Welsh’s novel Filth is a glossary of grimness, a dictionary of darkness. But it also dishes up humour that’s blacker than a winter’s night in the Highlands and unpolished anarchy that’s true to Welsh’s out-there, frighteningly frank prose.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    As filmmaking, X+Y is unassuming and not entirely remarkable, but the relationships play so sweetly and memorably.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Skyfall is a highly distinctive Bond movie. It has some stunning visual touches.... Also, it mostly manages to convince us that there’s something at stake by giving a hint of Bond’s emotional life beyond this story.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Rush is fast, slippery, stormy and dangerous.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Maybe an hour would have been enough, but even the slower patches have charm to burn.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    At times, you ache to put the brakes on the chaos, but still Pixar manages to do with all this what they do best, turning the everyday rough and smooth of childhood experience into a thoughtful, inventive adventure, full of totally appropriate lurid and strange imagery.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    You won’t know whether to laugh or cry.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Feels both modern and traditional – a halfway house between the broodier Nolan way of shaking things up and the louder, bone-crunching style that director Zack Snyder established with films such as ‘300’ and ‘Sucker Punch’. Man of Steel is punchy, engaging and fun, even if it slips into a final 45 minutes of explosions and fights during which reason starts to vanish and the science gets muddy.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    The world that Zootropolis creates is intelligent and fascinatingly detailed – it feels more like a movie by Disney-owned Pixar than a straight Disney film.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    It’s lightly played, often very funny and shot all over Paris with energy and wit, and boosted by superb, inquiring turns from Broadbent and Duncan.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    This is sombre, artful and winningly ambiguous.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    One of the most pleasing things about Blue Jasmine is that it feels truly knotty and never obvious in how it unfolds.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    The connections might be a little more strained and diffuse than in "Nostalgia for the Light", but their cumulative power is strong nonetheless.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    David Sington (In the Shadow of the Moon) shows extreme confidence in his subject by revealing the deeper truth in fragments, essentially allowing Nick to deliver a monologue or one man show, drawing us deeper and deeper into his story.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    Sometimes you find yourself wishing for an alternative version of the film unfolding before your eyes. ‘Belle’ is a good-looking and exceedingly polite film where perhaps a more complex one with less good manners would have been better.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    Nobby is hardly a character for the ages. He's a basic fool. The movie, too, is chaotic and crude. But its lack of sophistication, like its odd mix of souped-up action and base comedy, ultimately feels like a badge of honour.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    It has a rigorous, even unrelenting, grey, green and brown palette and, narratively, it’s tough to penetrate.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    There's no escaping it: Money Monster is a basic, silly movie. But it has on its side a top-notch cast and an entire absence of self-seriousness.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    A charismatic performance from Downey Jr and the growling presence of Duvall makes up for a multitude of sins in this big and brash family drama that puts the heavy emphasis on drama over family.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    This is a thoughtful film, but one that's slightly limited by its own careful restraint.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    It’s an uneven work, mysterious in its refusal to tell us much at all about Daniel, but it has a ring a truth to it even when it slips into less enigmatic thriller territory.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    Wears its heart a little too much on its sleeve. But it also manages to pack a punch, and the lead performances from Bercot and Cassel are strong.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    The film’s pace barely leaves you time to think – blink and you’ll lose the plot. But there’s plenty of imagination here to honour the spirit of Carroll’s topsy-turvy tales, even if the emotional resolutions are of a distinctly twenty-first-century sort.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    There’s a pleasing no-frills tone to the whole enterprise as well as a convincing grasp of the rituals and beliefs of the age.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    It’s a film that moves to the convincing rhythm of real life.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    What Luhrmann makes intoxicating is a sense of place – the houses, the rooms, the city, the roads – and the sense that all this is unfolding in a bubble like some mad fable. Where he falters is in persuading us that these are real, breathing folk whose experiences and destinies can move us.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    There’s nothing groundbreaking about the animation or script. That said, the characters and story still offer low-key charms.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    It's a bold film, full of energy and spunk, but a patchy, half-formed, rambling one too.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    The writing and direction lean towards the obvious, but there’s much to chew on regarding tradition, progress and the power of the white lie.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    War Dogs simply doesn’t dig deeply enough into the duo’s personalities to be more than a fitfully entertaining escapist spin on a ripped-from-the-headlines yarn.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    If you’ve never been to a burlesque show, now you know what you’re missing. The dedication and warmth of the performers are infectious.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    There are no interviews, characters nor narration, and after an hour it can feel like a chore. Yet the images are staggering.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    If its script is a little unwieldy and overwrought at times, Broken is still a work of delightful moments and strong promise for many of those involved. Norris works hard to inject some joy and wonder into what could easily be a much more dark and miserable experience.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    Visually, it’s never less than arresting. Gently amusing, too, is the relationship between Keitel and Caine, even if the dialogue Sorrentino writes for them often displays a fondness for empty epigrams.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    Luckily, there are just enough truths about ageing beneath its corny, farcical surface. Also, it’s hard not to enjoy two hours in the company of this cast.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    The word exploitation comes to mind.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    Thematically, White Elephant is a vague animal and its true interest never truly comes into focus.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    If the crime element feels like little more than a red herring, it’s the characters that give the film its appeal.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    There are no great upsets or fireworks here, just a tender sketch of what it means to (probably) be gay as a school kid. The storytelling style is as inoffensive as the music (Arvo Pärt, Belle and Sebastian), and the performances are amiable and relaxed.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    The unusually extended shooting period and Winterbottom’s decision to cast siblings as the kids make for a strangely intimate and powerful depiction of time passing and the peaks and troughs of childhood.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    Yes, The Lobster is arch: this is cinema in quotemarks, tongue-in-cheek storytelling that uses absurdity to hold a mirror to how we live and love. At its best, it has incisive things to say about how we shape ourselves and others just to banish the fear of being alone, unloved and friendless.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    Just the name ‘George Galloway’ – this doc’s presenter and co-writer – will have some vowing to go nowhere near this lively character assassination of Tony Blair. But anyone expecting wall-to-wall ranting and raving might be surprised by it’s relative sobriety.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    There are some genuine laughs, and the air of deep-frozen cynicism reminds you that Niven’s book was on to something behind the violence and farce.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    Beyond the shocks and games, there's not a great deal to take away in the form of meaty ideas or lingering themes, and its catchy premise doesn't really deliver in the end.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    Loushy’s project can feel repetitive, a bit too in awe of his admittedly significant sources. Perhaps most striking are their prophecies that this was only the beginning of an intractable conflict that could only get worse, not better.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    Luckily, Hawke and Delpy remain as charming as ever, and their combined goofiness is more endearing than annoying. Winning, too, is the sense that this peculiar project, though imperfect, could grow old with its audience and its cast.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    The film’s said to be autobiographical, but that’s entirely left to us to guess.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    Only Lovers Left Alive drags its feet and shows serious signs of anaemia as a story.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    Cloying at times – but always good-natured.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    Skarsgård himself is fairly bland as Greystoke, delivering a po-faced Byronic spin on the character, all velvet coats and dreamy romantic stares at his belle while sitting barefooted in the boughs of trees. But at least the animals are memorable – best of all is a pack of scene-stopping silverback gorillas digitally created for the movie. This Tarzan isn’t quite the jungle VIP – but it’s got a little swing.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    It’s anarchic, sometimes amusing, intermittently tedious, with ideas about digital alienation and the corruption of technology that too often feel blunt and tired.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    This slapdash but endearing doc about the rise, fall and resurrection of '80s pop outfit Spandau Ballet is an inside job, packed with strong archive footage yet lacking anything you'd call truly incisive.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    Some clunky coincidences and unlikely events confuse the film's mission, and it lacks the clarity and parable-like meaning of the brothers' best films.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    It’s a winning yarn, but Osmond has to crack the whip to get it over the finishing line.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    There’s something sloppy and sluggish about ‘Irrational Man’, even by Allen’s patchy standards.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    There are times when it feels underpowered or unfocused... but this is an intelligent, sensitive debut.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    Ayoade tips his hat to so many other filmmakers and writers that he leaves little room to consider anything other than what a good job he’s doing of distilling all his references into an effective Pinterest board of paranoia and alienation.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    What stops David Cronenberg’s grotesque noir Maps to the Stars, written by LA insider Bruce Wagner, from feeling tired is that it’s deliciously odd.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    It’s Bulger whose grim appearance and even grimmer behaviour ‘Black Mass’ indulges. But it’s the quieter, more complicated Connolly who offers the film’s subtler pleasures.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    It's to Ozon's credit that he never serves up easy answers.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    '71
    Demange is a strong storyteller and masks the script’s tendency to nod to every opinion and social division by offering a masterclass in tension as soon as his dramatic bomb starts ticking.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    Let’s not kid ourselves: cast-iron interpretations of Malick’s recent filmmaking are risky. It’s also a matter of taste. You either slip into the pretty, dreamlike, wistful groove of his later films or you don’t, and even hardened arthouse film lovers may find Knight of Cups way out of their comfort zone.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    It’s adequate and often fun, but no match for Cumberbatch’s talents: physically, his Assange is far more complex and intriguing than most of the things we hear him say or see him do.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    Hats off to Dreamworks for offering some bold surprises in a respectable sequel filled with moments of humour and emotion among its ample noise and movement.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    There's little humour, and strip away the styling and what it has to say about fashion has been said a thousand times before. But there's a mesmerising strangeness to Refn's vision that can't be denied, and Fanning does an especially good job of portraying innocence lost in the belly of the fashion beast.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    In the end, Love is more silly than sordid, and even a little soppy in its late – too late – love-filled moments. Many teens will love it; most adults will roll their eyes.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Calhoun
    The list of co-stars – Jane Fonda, Octavia Spencer, Aaron Paul – is so impressive that it’s hard to know what attracted everyone to such a soapy, cloying script.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Calhoun
    Writer-director Billy Ray (the writer of Captain Phillips and the first The Hunger Games) honours the Argentine original with keynote scenes set in a mirrored lift and a crowded sports stadium, but the mood is too often sluggish and pedestrian.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Calhoun
    Burton lets Waltz run wild, sucking the air out of every scene with his hysterics, and the always-endearing Adams is left looking like a rabbit in the headlights.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Calhoun
    Sentimental and shallow, although just passable as a kids’ movie.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Calhoun
    As the determined but fragile son, Reynor has a strong presence, but Collette’s character is too thinly sketched to make much sense.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Calhoun
    The Immigrant promises rich territory to explore, but in the execution it’s overly stately, dreary and unconvincing.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Calhoun
    [A] baggy revenge thriller consisting of short violent set pieces interspersed with far too many talky debates about the morality of protecting a killer.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Calhoun
    Daddy’s Home raises the occasional smile, but it’s not exactly Wahlberg or Ferrell’s finest hour.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Calhoun
    It’s intricate and often mature as drama, but it’s also meandering and at times heavy-handed, even melodramatic, and the tight control of time, place and action which made ‘A Separation’ so gripping is just not there.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Calhoun
    The thriller tendencies here are as half-cocked as its compassion for the struggles of parenthood, even if there are some admirable, if hard-to-watch, moments when Bier refuses to turn away from horror and pain.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Calhoun
    What Hooper fails to do is get to grips with sexual identity in any way that's intellectually or emotionally provocative or surprising. That makes for a cold, pretty, delicate movie – one that too often relies on scene-stealing production design or the overwhelmingly insipid score for its otherwise strikingly absent emotional power.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Calhoun
    This limp, sometimes lifeless business-trip comedy can’t decide whether to aim for teenage boys or their fathers. So it plumps for – and misses – both.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Calhoun
    Beneath the well-tuned atmospherics lurks a schlocky, fairly ludicrous and pretty distasteful yarn that ultimately puts the stress in all the wrong places.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Calhoun
    Grace of Monaco could have been a camp delight, but it feels too much like a stodgy, outdated television movie to work even as kitsch.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Calhoun
    There are only so many scenes anyone can take of Law (never suited to the geezer role) strutting down streets shooting his gob off. If it was all in service of a smart story, so be it. But it isn’t.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Calhoun
    The cast fail to gel and the tone of the film sways uneasily between melodrama and something more gentle. It’s too twee and theatrical to take seriously.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 20 Dave Calhoun
    Style over substance doesn’t really tell the half of it: you can bathe a corpse in groovy light and dress it in an expensive suit, but in the end that rotting smell just won’t go away.
    • 16 Metascore
    • 20 Dave Calhoun
    Sean Penn's pompous, ethically bankrupt humanitarian aid drama The Last Face would surely have worked better as a charity single.... Instead, we get this vain mess, a vacuous romance with real human pain as background noise and where the only honest pleasure is waiting to see what misstep it will take next.

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