For 865 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Edelstein's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Melancholia
Lowest review score: 0 Arthur
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 60 out of 865
865 movie reviews
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    My Winnipeg is overloaded and digressive--it comes with the territory--but it's also grounded in a place, Maddin's Manitoban hometown, and it's painfully engrossing.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    A tender, even-tempered elegy to a writer who at his peak could ingest staggering (literally) amounts of drugs and alcohol and transform, like Popeye after a can of spinach, into a superhuman version of himself--more trenchant, more cutting, more hilarious than any political journalist before or since.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Brown explores a potentially enraging subject--rigidly upheld racial segregation in the country's oldest Mardi Gras celebration, in Mobile, Alabama--but her touch is so unforced and her gaze so open that no one is bruised.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Ought to have been an eye-roller. What a surprise that it's so seductive. The Woodman lives!
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    You can't make this stuff up. You can, however, capture it on film for all time. Trouble the Water is ineradicably moving.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Moving Midway is thrilling.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    An uncommonly well-crafted historical feminist tearjerker--both anti-patriarchal and a monument to motherhood.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Leigh has been giving actors their tongues for decades, and of all his films, Happy-Go-Lucky is the easiest, the least labored.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Philippe Claudel's direction is both probing and delicate, and Scott Thomas's face, even immobile, keeps you watching, searching for hints of her character's past, unable to blink for fear of missing something vital.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    The result, however clichéd, is spectacularly unnerving: hair-trigger horror.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    As Bolt, John Travolta is inspired: His voice still cracks like an adolescent’s, and he has the perfect dopey innocence.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    It is filmed with simplicity, a purity of intent, and I wanted to watch the faces of these men in their last seconds of life--not for the sake of history, but because of Wajda's imperative to put his father's death onscreen. He needed to do this. And somehow, sanity is restored.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    The first half of The Yellow Handkerchief is the half-movie of the year, and the rest isn’t bad--just more sentimental, more ordinary.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    If you can get past the craven concessions to formula, though, it’s rather underful--I mean, wonderful. Taking his cues from John Tenniel’s famous illustrations, Burton indulges his delight in disproportion.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    A senseless blast.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    The film is, in fact, a cunning exercise in subjectivity and withheld information--and once you accept those parameters, it’s riveting.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Morton is one of those tingly actresses whose skin barely covers her soul, and to watch her search for tender mercies in a crazy-hostile world is a gift. The film is appallingly good.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    The cutting is hyperkinetic, yet Lee is always in synch with the cast’s phenomenal energy. He’s in their thrall--and so are we.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Sensationally effective.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    At its midpoint, the film could go either way: toward "The Hand That Rocks the Cradle" psychosis or something more hopeful and humanistic. It’s a testament to Saavedra’s tough performance that even with a happy ending, you wouldn’t want to leave her with your kids.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    In the flawless cast, Williams is the most affecting.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Calculated to enrage and pulling it off like gangbusters, Don Argott’s documentary The Art of the Steal pits the legacy of the late Albert C. Barnes’s Barnes Foundation (which boasts arguably the world’s finest collection of French Impressionist and Post-Impressionist art) against the social-climbing, philistine, downright Nixonian machinations of Philadelphia’s wealthiest--who gamed the system and pried the collection loose in defiance of Barnes’s legal will.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    This is an extraordinary film.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Narrated by Rhys Ifans with the dryness of a dessicated toad, Exit Through the Gift Shop is both an exhilarating testament to serendipity and an appalling testament to art-world inanity.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Anton Chekhov's The Duel is convincingly-yes--Chekhovian.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    It’s smoothly written and smartly paced, and Michael Douglas is riveting.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    As both men lie to loved ones to keep their exchange alive, the tension builds and becomes unbearable.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Think "In the Mood for Love" with hookahs instead of chopsticks.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    In The Town, he (Renner) doesn't signal that Jem is a sociopath... It's a deeply unnerving performance, beyond good or evil.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    The poetic Swedish vampire picture (with arterial spray) "Let the Right One In" has been hauntingly well transplanted to the high desert of Los Alamos, New Mexico, and renamed Let Me In.