David Edelstein

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For 1,946 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Edelstein's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Marjorie Prime
Lowest review score: 0 Arthur
Score distribution:
1946 movie reviews
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Stillman's comeback comedy Damsels in Distress is wobbly and borderline twee, but it deepens as it goes along and becomes rich.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The Snow White comedy Mirror, Mirror turns out to be not that terrible - or maybe it's that the terrible first half hour wears you down so much that the rest seems relatively pleasant.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Bully is repetitive and not especially artful, but children who allow themselves to see the world through the eyes of the film's victims will never be the same.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Watching The Hunger Games, I was struck both by how slickly Ross hit his marks and how many opportunities he was missing to take the film to the next level - to make it more shocking, lyrical, crazy, daring.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    There's no wonder or elation or even dopy sincerity here - just a high level of proficiency and, yes, a lot of expensive CGI.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Despite the simplicity of the brothers' technique, The Kid With a Bike has deep religious underpinnings, a relentless drive toward the mythos of death and resurrection. The film is not just in the tradition of Pinocchio and A.I.: It is a worthy successor.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It has a bad, slapstick first act but by midpoint becomes strangely compelling, tapping into the fantasy of reliving one's high-school years (which did a number on us all) and getting it right.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Westfeldt, now 42, belongs to a generation (and class) of people for whom nothing about having kids is easy. Her intensity feels just right - better than in any film I've seen in years - for How We Breed Now.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 20 David Edelstein
    Dr. Seuss's The Lorax [sic] isn't Seussian in spirit. It's shrill and campy and stuffed with superfluous characters.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    In totalitarian societies, artists have found all sorts of ways - some brilliantly imaginative - to disguise their political protest, but Panahi has no subterfuges left. This Is Not a Film ends with a whimper that is a bang. He must be freed.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It's not fresh terrain for satire, yet most of the jokes play riotously well.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    [A] compelling film touching on the perils of being young - that's it, merely young - in a culture without justice.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    There are a couple of hundred instances in which Johnson or her actors could take condescending short cuts and slip into white-trash stereotypes, but I didn't see any - only gifted performers vanishing into their characters, refusing to pass judgment.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The gut-whomping, high-concept romantic thriller This Means War is not a distinguished addition to director McG's oeuvre.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    There is one nice pop-up scare against a dozen or so false, ineffectual ones - a poor percentage. As the title states, she is a woman and wears black, but she might as well be a hastily decked-out script girl for all her impact.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    In outline, In Darkness is a standard conversion melodrama, but little within those parameters is easy. The darkness lingers into the light.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    You've got to make room in your heart for a film in which the world ends with neither a bang nor a whimper but a cuddle.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    The final twist is both baffling and repulsive, but as an evocation of the triumph of evil, it's peerless.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    A poky but blood-freezing throwback to the gothic horror films of the seventies, when ingénues moved tremulously down dark corridors without holding digital video cameras.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Neeson's gravity elevates the action, and there's a fine, prickly performance by an actor new to me, Frank Grillo, as the asshole of the group. But The Grey, despite moments of sublimity, is as predictable as a funeral. When Ottway angrily calls out to God, the nonanswer is sadly redundant.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Soderbergh tends to get one big idea - a thesis idea - per film and stick with it even when a touch more flexibility would help. Here it's that non-kinetic camera, which he's so wedded to that parts of the film seem underenergized, like a cheap seventies or early eighties picture you'd catch at two in the morning on Cinemax's tenth most popular channel.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The performance is extraordinary, literally: Close resembles no man I've ever seen, or woman either. She's the personification of fear - the fear of being seen through, seen for what she is.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    A Joyful Noise overcomes. The big numbers are a gospel-pop-funk fusion that made me think, Hmmm, this seems very processed - before I noticed my feet were tapping of their own accord. How can you resist that wah-wah funk guitar?
    • 18 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    It has been a long time since I've heard people - many people - distinctly yell, "Boo!" Usually they just growl or moan or hiss. They don't bother actually to articulate the word "Boo!" I second their statement. The ending reeks.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    What makes it so good is that no one is bad. These humans, desperate to do right, are caught up in a perfect storm of inhumanity. The evil is in the ecosystem.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Shallow but satisfying, largely because of Meryl Streep and her big fake English teeth and gift for using mimicry as a means of achieving empathy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    As Brown becomes more flagrantly self-destructive and at the same time more deluded, you realize you're watching "Bad Lieutenant" made by a tediously finger-wagging Jew instead of a tediously desecrating Catholic.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    That wordiness coupled with Cronenberg's classical restraint is part of the splendid Freudian joke at the movie's center.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    McQueen films his characters like specimens in a jar, but the stakes are so high that the actors deliver.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The Sitter feels slapdash and quick, but you might not want to have it any other way.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    The movie spreads bad vibes like a virus.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    The only reason to put yourself through Guy Ritchie's overblown, inelegant Sherlock Holmes: Game of Shadows is to see Jared Harris, who plays Professor Moriarty, in a chilling low key.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie is wonderful, nonsensical fun.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    A scabrous, amusing, and thoroughly predictable exercise in exposing the animalistic underbellies of grown-ups pretending to be civilized liberals.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Cameron Crowe is a romantic bordering on utopian, and his authentic family values - biological and surrogate - shine through in his enchanting We Bought a Zoo.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    But the question hangs: Does this artificial, three-hankie scenario justify its 9/11 appropriations? Dry your eyes and decide for yourself.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 David Edelstein
    Everything he did in live-action movies with rolling boulders and runaway convoys he does bigger and better - by a factor of ten - in every frame. At the end of two hours, my jaw ached from grinning.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 David Edelstein
    Spielberg has been ridiculed for shooting his actors from below against impossibly Spielbergian skies and a denouement that lays the love on copiously. But there's nothing simpleminded about how he uses movie magic, as a spell to dispel nihilism, to save us from the worst of ourselves by summoning up the best.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    David Fincher's American remake of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo adds nothing to the previous adaptation, but it's certainly the more evocative piece of filmmaking.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    I've heard it said that Le Carré's work lost its savor with the end of the Cold War, which is as dumb as discounting "Coriolanus" because Romans and ­Volscians are no longer killing each other. Le Carré's subject was the national character and what happened to it under threat and in the absence of public scrutiny. It could hardly be, mutatis mutandis, more contemporary.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    For all the wizardry on display, Hugo often feels like a film about magic instead of a magical film.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Fiennes and Logan haven't made a definitive Coriolanus, but they've made a sensationally gripping one. They have the pulse of the play, its firm martial beats and its messy political clatter. They tell a damn good story.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    In any case, the last twenty minutes of Breaking Dawn are so harrowing that it's possible to forget that most of the acting is soap-operatic (the guy who plays Carlisle is aging to look like Liberace) and the dialogue from hunger. The movie's that primal.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Payne is too acerbic - maybe too much of an asshole - to settle for easy humanism. But he's too smart a dramatist to settle for easy derision. Mockery and empathy seesaw, the balance precarious - and thrillingly so. It's the noblest kind of satire: cruel and yet, in the end, lacking the killing blow.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 David Edelstein
    The vision is as hateful as it is hate-filled, but the fusion of form and content is so perfect that it borders on the sublime.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    It's too bad J. Edgar is so shapeless and turgid and ham-handed, so rich in bad lines and worse readings. Not DiCaprio, though.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    The Rum Diary has no mighty gonzo wind. Even with a push from its Thompson-worshipping star, Johnny Depp, it leaves our freak flag limp.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    A shameless but exuberantly well-done caper comedy.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Like Crazy has a lively syntax and could, in an ungrateful mood, be tagged as slick. But Doremus gets the tempos right.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    A well-polished cowpat that will confuse and bore those who know nothing about Shakespeare and incense those who know almost anything.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The non-ending turns the whole movie into an elaborate tease, too creepy to dismiss, too shallow to justify its "ambiguities."
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    A hell of a picture. And shrewd.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It's the only Almodóvar movie in which feeling, emotional or sexual, doesn't suffuse the imagery and hold the ramshackle melodrama together.
    • 17 Metascore
    • 0 David Edelstein
    The movie is a reductio ad absurdum, a sick joke taken to extremes, beginning with a goof on the notion that horror movies inspire copycats and ending with a test to determine whether some people will watch anything.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    It's tempting to praise The Ides of March as a realistic depiction of how low we've sunk. But that would mean accepting the second-rate writing and third-rate melodrama and incredible shrinking characters.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    This is the first bad movie that has ever made me call for a sequel - to get it all right.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie belongs to Gordon-­Levitt and Anna Kendrick as his painfully green therapist.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Nichols has a genius for making landscapes and everyday objects resonate like crazy, for nailing the texture of dread.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    I hate to damage so fragile a work with overpraise, but, gay or straight, if you don't see yourself in this movie, you need to get a life.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie doesn't quite come together, but it's full of smart, cynical talk, and it's very entertaining.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Like much of Soderbergh's recent work, Contagion feels a little sterile, more like a cinematic exercise than something with blood pumping through it. It's certainly high-minded - it might be the most high-minded disaster movie ever made.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Every bit as dumb as August's "Conan the Barbarian" but awash in neon-lit nightscapes and existential dread, with killings so graphic that you can't entirely believe what you're gagging at.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Yes, I cringed at the casting, too, especially when, watching the trailer, I heard Parker deliver the narration in the same voice she used for Carrie in "Sex and the City." But Kate is funnier - less arch - than Carrie, and Parker reminds you what a dizzy, all-in, high-risk comic actress she can be when she's not too busy showing off the couture.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 10 David Edelstein
    Apollo 18, isn't egregiously inept. It just never lives. It's 80 minutes of dead air.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Luc Besson's Jumping Frog Action Factory looks mighty lame in Colombiana.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It's a tough, beautifully judged performance (Davis) - it gives this too-soft movie a spine.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    In Mysteries of Lisbon, the prolific Chilean-born director and egghead Raúl Ruiz has achieved something remarkable, at once avant-garde and middlebrow: the apotheosis of the soap opera.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Cornish, like Edgar Wright (who directed "Shaun of the Dead" and was an executive producer here), can parody a genre in a way that revitalizes it, that reminds you why the genre was born in the first place. The movie is in a different galaxy than "Cowboys & Aliens": It has, in both senses, guts.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    An agreeable time-killer, but I'll bet a couple of clever kids could make a livelier movie with a Woody puppet and a Predator doll.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The script, by Dan Fogelman, is unusually and gratifyingly bisexual - i.e., it boasts scenes from both the male and female points of view!
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    This could be the premise of a zany comedy, but the mood of The Future is, from the outset, defeatist - annoyingly defeatist, to be frank.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Tabloid is candy for voyeurs. We laugh like mad at a nut whose only mistake was being born in the last century, too early to have made real money.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    HPATDH 2 works like a charm. A funereal charm, to be sure, but then, there's no time left for larks.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    You get a bad feeling early in Project Nim, the brilliant, traumatizing documentary by James Marsh (Man on Wire).
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The film is sometimes gentle to the point of blandness, but it's never flimsy.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Meehl, in her directing debut, is attuned to the rhythms of Buck, who's attuned to the horses.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Apart from having no particular reason to exist onscreen, especially at these prices, it's not half bad.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It would be easy to dismiss as 100 percent ersatz if it didn't rekindle at least some of the old excitement - and if the magic of Spielberg's older movies didn't filter through, like light from a distant galaxy.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Mike Mills's marvelously inventive romantic comedy Beginners is pickled in sadness, loss, and the belief that humans (especially when they mate) are stunted by their parents' buried secrets, their own genetic makeup, and our sometimes-sociopathic social norms.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    After warming up with "The Thin Red Line" and "The New World," Malick has succeeded in fully creating his own film syntax, his own temporal reality, and lo, it is … kind of goofy. But riveting.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    I've never seen a film in which what was actually onscreen seemed so irrelevant.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    This supernatural comedy isn't just Allen's best film in more than a decade; it's the only one that manages to rise above its tidy parable structure and be easy, graceful, and glancingly funny, as if buoyed by its befuddled hero's enchantment.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Equal parts trippy, tacky, and monumental, the blend surprisingly agreeable, a happy change from all those aggressively down-to-earth superhero flicks like "Iron Man."
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    That lawn with its scraps of a ruined life is a setting both satirical and poignant, and Will Ferrell gives a performance of Chekhovian depth.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Gibson is better in the later scenes, when Walter tries to escape the Beaver's nefarious influence. And Gibson's never bad. It's just that we know how much is missing. As a raging nutcase, he's capable of so much more.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    There's something appealing about the movie's unpretentious carnival of carnage, although I could have done without the flamethrower assault on a school bus to raise the stakes.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Has a mixture of bloodletting and exultation that would make Sam Peckinpah sit up in his grave and howl with pleasure.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    When the film shifts to Shanghai and the club Casablanca, there's too much lustrous-hued loitering and too few martial­-arts set pieces.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    Amusing and annoying in the wrong ratio, maybe 30/70.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Cave of Forgotten Dreams is sometimes frozen by Herzog's awe. But it's hard not to love him for always trying to look beyond the surface of things, to find a common chord in the landscape of dreams.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It's surprising that The Greatest Movie Ever Sold plays so entertainingly, given that Spurlock's quest is essentially beside the point.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    The movie doesn't quite jell, but you'll feel its sting for hours.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    For all its indirection, Meek's Cutoff is an utterly conventional film. But it's worth asking whether Reichardt's drowsy rhythms, stripped-down scenario, and female vantage add up to something illuminating. And here's where she earns at least some of those plaudits she's been getting.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 0 David Edelstein
    In Arthur, the spectacularly grating remake of Steve Gordon's 1981 P. G. Wodehouse simulation (this time, Peter Baynham miswrote, Jason Winer misdirected), Russell Brand gives a career-killing performance.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Yes, this farrago of fairy tale and sci-fi conspiracy flick is, on one level, howlingly obvious. But there are howls of derision and howls of amazement, and mine were of the latter kind, mostly.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The screenwriter, James Solomon, does the poor job only a liberal could at making the case for a Cheneyesque "dark side," and he isn't helped by Kline's wooden acting. Too bad. The Conspirator is eloquent enough to let the other side have its say.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Bier dramatizes our ambivalence so earnestly that it's tempting to give her awards rather than admit that the movie is a crushing bore.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The thing is scary as hell when it's all creaks and thumps and doors swinging open. Then come the explanations, the special effects, and the inevitable feeling of been-there-been-­bombarded-by-that.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    It's a crackerjack ride, shot and edited for maximum discombobulation.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The third and least original of the Pegg-Frost features, but it's still a lot funnier than most films of its ilk.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Wasikowska's Jane is as watchful as only a damaged soul can be, and, when challenged, frighteningly fast.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    The movie has none of the smugness of "­American Beauty": You could dream of living in a world like this.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Blessed is the go-for-it movie that can make room for dissonances and weirdness.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Uncle Boonmee is entrancing-and also, if you're not sufficiently steeped in its rhythms, narcotizing.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It's a terrific performance-and terrifying. Owen Wilson is aging: Where goeth my own youth?
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    The doughy Damon and aristocratic Blunt don't match up physically, and they never get any Hepburn-Tracy rhythms going that might create some current.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The Eagle is furiously unsettled-thematically, temporally, meteorologically. Wild-eyed, long-haired Brits leap atop the Romans' shields as the soldiers blindly hack away, the bodies so close that you can barely tell the victor from the vanquished. The battles in the fog and rain have a hallucinatory power.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    This sensationally engineered promo film makes Justin Bieber look like a true force of nature.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It comes together neatly, perhaps too neatly to be … poetry. But it's not prosaic, either. It has a lucid grace.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It helps that Reilly is the opposite of a slob-comic. With his hangdog melancholy, he makes even the nonstop cunnilingus allusions poignant-the product of emotional longing.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    The movie ends abruptly-too abruptly for my taste-but the gaiety lingers through the closing credits. Not even apocalypse can dispel the sexy vibes.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    As much of her (Steen) as there is, you'll want more.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    No Strings Attached is so palpably calculated that you know if the camera had pulled back a foot from the bed in which Portman and Kutcher were pretending to have sex, you'd have seen their agents standing by beaming: proud parents, proud pimps.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Perhaps the late Blake Edwards could have found a balance between slapstick and psychodrama, but Ron Howard can't get the pacing right, and Allan Loeb's script is even wordier than the one he wrote for "Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps."
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    At least The Green Hornet is likable, and a refreshing change from the heavy, angst-ridden superhero pictures so beloved by obnoxious fanboys.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    This is a mood piece, shapeless but often lyric.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Another year, another Mike Leigh gem.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Blue Valentine leaves you with the shattering vision of its truest victim-the one who'll someday look for safety in places it might not be. And the psychodrama will go on and on …
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    The Kidman in Rabbit Hole is a revelation.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Love & Other Drugs is crazily uneven, jumping back and forth between jerk-off jokes and Parkinson's sufferers sharing their stories of hope. It's the sort of movie in which half the audience will be drying their eyes and the other half rolling them.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The sad part is that How Do You Know is nowhere near as dumb as it looks. A couple of comic set pieces are inspired-or would be, if Brooks's timing weren't off.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    With a million times more computing power at its disposal than its 1982 predecessor, Tron: Legacy still looks like Disco Night at the jai alai fronton.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The drama is so muddled that Shakespeare seems to be getting in the way of Taymor's spectacle, the magic long gone by the time Prospera hurls her staff off into the sea.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    The movie has so much texture that once it gets you, you're good and got.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    True Grit isn't as momentous an event as you might hope, but once you adjust to its deliberate rhythms (it starts slowly), it's a charming, deadpan Western comedy.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    It's a prizewinning combination, terribly English and totally Hollywood, and Firth is, once more, uncanny: He evokes, in mid-stammer, existential dread.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    I hope that in Part 2, Yates and screenwriter Steve Kloves give Fiennes a better send-off than Dame J.K. did in her less-than-wizardly climactic wandathon. Having made us sit through two and a half hours with no payoff, they'd better not go all Muggle on us. Next time, we want magic, people.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 David Edelstein
    This is, no doubt about it, a tour de force, a work that fully lives up to its director's ambitions.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 10 David Edelstein
    Even if the film were well done, it would still be a travesty.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    It's hard to do justice to Hawkins's acting, because you never actually see it: Her Rita simply is.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 20 David Edelstein
    He (Perry) has taken Shange's landmark poem cycle for seven African-American actresses, cut it up, and sewn its bloody entrails into a tawdry, masochistic soap opera that exponentially ups the "Precious" ante.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    It's probably easier for an ex-prosecutor known for macho threats to say he got caught screwing than for him to say he got screwed. But folks, he was reamed.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Exposed, abandoned, branded as traitors, the Wilsons finally have no choice but to tell their story, the latest chapter of which is this potent Hollywood melodrama.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    As in his pithy, tuneful songs-many written from different perspectives, in different styles-Merritt is committed to stylizing his misery instead of boring you with it.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Ken Hixon's script contrives a lot of mutual-healing set pieces and then sadly but shrewdly aborts them: That makes the drama more Chekhovian than "quite real."
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Larsson is renowned for his attention to marginal details, which gives his prose a rambling, one-thing-after-another pace that many readers find soothing. Onscreen, the lack of acceleration makes for one of those long Scandinavian winter nights.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Hereafter occupies some muzzy twilight zone, too woo-woo sentimental to be real, too limp to make for even a halfway decent ghost story.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    There are times when Dafoe's accent strays into Billy Crystal Yiddish, but the notion of Vlad the Impaler aging into a finicky old Jew has its own kind of piquancy.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    Bizarrely depressing.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    It takes some time to realize we're in a maelstrom--going down down down into a saga of obsession, sadism, masochism, and codependency that was and remains one of the great, sick tabloid stories of all time.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    I’m not wholly clear on the link between a jellied green thing wriggling along a tree branch and the oneness of life, but Shinto Buddhist ruminations sound good in almost any context, and the film is entrancing.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    9 Songs could have been "Last Rock Show in London." Unfortunately, it's stupefyingly dull, even with good music and at the short but resonant length of 69 minutes.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The movie is a collision between inspiration and tastelessness, between the defiantly quirky and the wholesomely homogenized. I hated it in principle--I hate most modern Disney cartoons--but adored a good deal of it in practice.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Battle for Haditha has some of the raw energy of Sam Fuller's war pictures, which weren't subtle but left you energized by their ambivalence (there was no good or evil). It's a hell of a picture.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Master and Commander hooks you from its nifty opening salvo to its nifty closing punch line.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    I’ve never seen a movie that so cunningly exploits our anticipation.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    In any case, the best performance is by Bridgette Wilson-Sampras as the conniving but peppy slut at the perfume counter. Her big scene--farcical, filthy, surprising--is also the best in the movie. Otherwise, Shopgirl is sadly vacuous, with a sadly vacuous center.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Even when you're able to guess the next calamity, it's still a shock in its ejaculatory intensity. The Farrellys never throw in the towel. Pretentious Sundance independents could learn a lot from such pistols.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    As Nash gets closer to Crowe's own age (and level of dissipation), the performance settles down and becomes first credible and then overwhelming. This is a stupendous piece of acting.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Here's what's depressing: that, given the millions spent on defense by multinational conglomerates, our last best hope isn't the courts but the fickle attentions of glossy magazines and the noblesse oblige of celebrities.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Often howlingly funny, and the actors are a treat. But the underlying message is so suspect that it’s hard to suspend disbelief.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Ultimately, it has less in common with "Blair Witch" than with such quivering lumps of sentiment as "Ghost" and Field of Dreams."
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Bahrani’s concentration is close to supernatural as he tracks the young, prepubescent Ale (Alejandro Polanco) from job to soul-numbing job, some legal, some extralegal, to the point where you’re forced to suspend altogether your moral judgments and watch with a mixture of pain and awe.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It's totally implausible, and yet it gets at something unnervingly real: the way that people can blow a budding relationship by being too honest with each other.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    I love Nicholson here because he lets Keaton take the movie--and his relative reticence is very attractive.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    The script by Steve Faber and Bob Fisher is one of those high-speed, ping-pong-banter marvels in which you're still laughing from the last great line when you're hit by the next.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    All its themes are laid out like index cards on a screenwriter's bulletin board, and each plot turn seems so inevitable that you'll think you saw this movie in a previous life. (You did.)
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It's tricky, it's surprising, and it's largely faithful to the original mini-series, but in context it's a nonevent. It's like a time bomb that's never dismantled but never explodes. The movie is good enough that the ending leaves you … not angry, exactly. Unfulfilled.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    It is filmed with simplicity, a purity of intent, and I wanted to watch the faces of these men in their last seconds of life--not for the sake of history, but because of Wajda's imperative to put his father's death onscreen. He needed to do this. And somehow, sanity is restored.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It's depressing that this first movie in years to dramatize the American Revolution has so little to do with the politics of secession and so much to do with pop-culture themes of vigilantism.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    It's the human struggle that makes this a sci-fi masterpiece.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Like his protagonist, Bahrani never gives up on William; his camera never stops probing. He loves West's face, and he honors its mystery.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    In patches it's agreeably lurid, but it's otherwise ho-hum.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Think "In the Mood for Love" with hookahs instead of chopsticks.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 10 David Edelstein
    Turns into a moronic, psycho-on-the-loose picture pretty quickly.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    Jumper is so in sync with the language of modern action movies that it’s possible to look past its soullessness and go with the quantum flow.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Say this for actors: Too self-centered to be embarrassed, they can be existential heroes of a (moronic) sort.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    This is an extraordinary -- and unfathomable -- piece of whitewashing: a true snow job.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Not enough happens in it. And yet everything happens in it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The laughs are fuller when they're rooted in authentic desperation, and the premise is yeasty enough to keep the film from sinking into facile hopelessness.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The film is based on a novel by Susan Minot--one of those books where the author doesn't deign to put dialogue in quotation marks for fear of dispelling the dreamlike mood. It works on paper, but Minot, who shares credit for the adaptation with fellow novelist Michael Cunningham, doesn't understand that screenwriting is the art of taking away.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    W.
    W. isn't gripping enough as drama or witty enough as satire. It's neutered.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Once the premise had been established and the leads began to interact, I stopped totting up the inanities and had a good time.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    A depressing comeback for Jane Fonda, but it's still nice to see her in movies again, and in something that isn't dripping with self-actualizing virtue like her last projects.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    A religious conspiracy disguised as a romance.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    This is finally the zombie flick as cautionary political tale, and as humanist parable. It's not the flesh-gouging zombie we have to worry about, the filmmakers suggest, but the soul-gouging zombie within.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It's hard to get past the primitiveness of Allen’s fantasies.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    An extremely pleasant, consistently amusing diversion that is never as uproarious as you might hope. But don't panic, as the Guide would say. In a pinch, it will do.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It's a measure of Brooks' stature that he survives the self-sabotage and comes through with his most engaging performance in years.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    For all its missteps, Mystic River gets the big things right: It turns you inside out with grief, and it builds to an act of vigilante murder that is nearly impossible to endure.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    There's a car chase that's more fluid and inventive than the much-touted freeway sequence in "The Matrix Reloaded," and the stars are nimble enough to make their acrobatics credible--no matter how many stunt doubles the picture employed.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Using R.E.M.'s impassioned "Everybody Hurts"--written by Michael Stipe after the suicide of Kurt Cobain--to underscore shots of Kidman and Ferrell feeling blue about their inability to pair off is an aesthetic crime. The Ephrons should be fined and forced to do a few hundred hours of community service.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    If nothing else, Training Day is a gorgeous pedestal for Denzel Washington.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Blistering and nihilistic--a vision to reduce you to a puddle of despair.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    It's madly funny--a treat for moviegoers who don't mind gnawed-off limbs with their high jinks.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Riveting and so suggestive that you can't consume it passively: You have to brood on it.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    I think the movie works best if you know the original and have a taste for goofy revisionism.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Spiderwick. There’s nothing wrong with it that passion and personality couldn’t fix.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Frustratingly anemic, the filmmakers hiding behind their good taste and sensitivity. They might as well have gone for broke, since Plath and Hughes' daughter accused them of monstrous exploitation anyway.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 20 David Edelstein
    This is a two-hour-and-six-minute snuff movie -- The Jesus Chainsaw Massacre -- that thinks it's an act of faith.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    It strides above its crudeness like a colossus. It's smart people telling dumb jokes with a brilliant sense of irony. Anchorman gives you permission to laugh like an idiot.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Apart from a few choice flashbacks, the action is crawlingly linear--and opaque.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    I'd like to recommend it, but it's too silly. On the plus side, it's ravishingly well directed by Antonia Bird.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    An unusually powerful mess, a broad satire of suburban self-indulgence with little in the way of a consistent style, and with a character who's serious business: a convicted child molester.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Does Rocky Balboa deliver? Weirdly enough, it does: I was jumping out of my seat during Rocky's bout. If you close your eyes and try to halve your IQ--aim for something between a baboon and a lemur--you might even think it's a masterpiece.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 20 David Edelstein
    The movie is barely sufferable.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    But there are scenery chewers and there are Michelin-gourmet scenery chewers, and Pacino has a three-star feast.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie, without seeming to realize it, turns into a romantic parable about the joys of being absorbed by a conglomerate.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The film is repetitive, top-heavy: Wright blows his wad too early. But a different lead might have kept you laughing and engaged.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    His (Sidney Lumet) touch in Before the Devil is so sure, so perfectly weighted, that it’s hard to imagine him capable of making a bad movie. The thing is just enthralling.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Manito is the rare little movie that gets bigger as it goes along--so big that it can hardly contain its own emotion.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 0 David Edelstein
    If it isn't the worst sequel ever made, it's only because it has too much competition: Impersonal and frenetic, it's a landmark Hollywood disgrace.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Too long, too sexist, and too--shall we say--flaccid. But it has its moments.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Most of all, I enjoyed the picture's subtext, which is that Smith has become so sensitized to Internet abuse -- that the cathartic climax consists of tracking down bellicose posters (all of whom turn out to be adolescent dweebs) and pummeling the crap out of them.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It’s puffed up in obvious ways but disarmingly puckish in others. As that capering pirate, De Niro is god-awful--yet his gung-ho spirit wins him Brownie points.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    I was all revved up to have a whale of a fascist good time, and S.W.A.T. left me let down and pissed-off.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    Emminently skippable.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    The smartest, funniest, and best-looking sci-fi comedy since the movies learned to morph.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 20 David Edelstein
    What was already a raucous put-on, a goof on Aldrich's brutal action movies, is now a hyperbolic, gross-out cartoon, with a cast of enormous ex-football stars (plus the 7-foot-2-inch Indian wrestler Dalip Singh) only adding to the air of facetiousness.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    There is a special kind of pleasure in hearing jokes that have no redeeming social value. I'd like to think that this IS their social value-an invitation to free the mind.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Am I the only one who finds the substance of this movie repulsive?
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 David Edelstein
    You should see Happy Feet--not only because it's stupendous, but also because it features the best dancing you'll see on the screen this year.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    The final illuminations (people have demons, a mind is a terrible thing to lose) are a poor return on nearly two hours of ear-buckling, eye-stabbing incoherence.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Becomes increasingly unwatchable -- not just bleak but punishing, as if the director wants to fry your circuits along with his characters'.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    My first viewing left me dazzled but slightly confused; a second deeply impressed; a third rhapsodic. I wish I hadn't needed to rediagram it in my head to turn it into the masterpiece it so obviously wants to be.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 David Edelstein
    The new Pixar picture Wall-E is one for the ages, a masterpiece to be savored before or after the end of the world.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Law gives a doozy of a performance: He's fond of bulging his eyes, curling his head like a gargoyle, and displaying a set of rotten yellow teeth. This is some of the most flamboyantly bad acting since Brad Pitt in "Twelve Monkeys" (1995). An Oscar nomination would appear inevitable.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    This is lovely, momentous piffle.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    I half-admire its exquisite balancing act, squeezing laughs out of its leading lady's wardrobe, vocabulary, gestures, and cretinously oblivious Beverly Hills sense of entitlement, while simultaneously demonstrating her brilliance, sturdy ethics, and unflappable egalitarianism.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The middling romantic comedy Smart People, which centers on a hyperintellectual dysfunctional family, is of interest chiefly for the first post-Juno role of Ellen Page.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Like a lot of Gilliam's movies it's too overloaded--antic, indulgent, overdesigned--to get off the ground for more than a minute or two at a stretch.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Love it or laugh at it, you will gaze on Southland Tales with awe.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It's scary to have to puzzle out a plot line scene by scene -- scary and exhilarating, at least for an hour.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The movie isn't as world-shattering as those bouts: It's a regretful-old-warrior weeper.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    A fascinatingly strange and chaotic ballet set to familiar noir motifs.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Isn't bad as these things go, although these things go nowhere a healthy individual should want to. Having never claimed to be a healthy individual, I found it tolerable.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Howard manipulates audiences without guile, jerking tears, piling on catastrophes, smoothing out dissonances, making bad characters badder and good ones gooder--and clearly believing that this is wholesome. At what he does, he's peerless. I wish I had more respect for what he does--and for myself the next morning for surrendering.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 David Edelstein
    The best American movie of the year. Has a subtext so powerful that it reaches out and pulls you under. Even when the surface is tranquil, you know in your guts what's at stake.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 20 David Edelstein
    I had a hard time maintaining interest in (let along liking) any of these self-involved Hollywood twerps, and scene after scene is a grating mixture of self-aggrandizement and masochism.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Anything Else feels driven. It's like a rant from a therapist's couch--angry, unmediated, free-associational, unleavened by sentiment or compassion. And it's something else that Allen hasn't been lately: funny.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It's fascinating trying to separate the thirties material from the mostly maladroit additions.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 0 David Edelstein
    The movie stinks to heaven.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    The movie is so Burtonesque that it verges on self-parody--but it's fun and stunningly beautiful anyway.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    With its featherweight premise, casually amoral heroes, and exotic locales, it conjures up an era (the '60s and '70s) when twisty, romantic heist pictures were routinely ground out as tax shelters.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Bogdanovich has been so smooth and loving in his directorial attentions that he has forgotten to give the tragical farce proceedings any terrible momentum.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    And you wait--and wait--for the magic of movies.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Mother and Child is suffused with grief and loss. It’s also suffused with compassion and insight.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    What saves Zatoichi is that it ends -- for no clear reason -- with a foot-stomping ensemble dance number that is both delightful and unhinging: It sends you home with spasmodic giggles, convinced this Japanese imp has discovered a new path to your unconscious.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Duchovny is rather endearing and Driver's absolutely enchanting.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Except for a screamingly funny climax in which he attempts to kidnap Pamela Anderson (who reportedly wasn't in on the joke), I found the Borat feature (directed by Larry Charles, who does similar duties on "Curb Your Enthusiasm") depressing; and the paroxysms of the audience reinforced the feeling that I was watching a bearbaiting or pigsticking.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 David Edelstein
    For all its portentousness, this is the best Harry Potter picture yet. In some ways, it improves on J.K. Rowling’s novel, which is punishingly protracted and builds to a climactic wand-off better seen than read.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    I've shot people for less.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Boorman pays a price for his neutrality: The General isn't an emotional grabber. But on its own terms it's nearly perfect. The magic is there but below the surface.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 20 David Edelstein
    Made for the most excruciating two-and-a-half hours I've ever spent in a theater.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    He does gorgeous work, but in Mission to Mars he's only going through the motions.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    A pretty good action flick -- twisty, marvelously acted, and energetically (if not always coherently) staged.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    Most of the dialogue and effects are clunky, repetitive, second-rate. A minute or so of David Lynch’s latest Twin Peaks series has more irrational menace. For all its feverish activity, Mother! feels static.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    For all the movie's pixilated transitions, fisticuffs, and hyper-alert climaxes at the roulette table, there's a kind of temperamental evenness that's perfectly in sync with the protagonist.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    I urge you not to pass up Black Book, especially on a wide screen. It's a marvelous movie-movie, with a new screen goddess. Van Houten has a soft, heart-shaped face on top of a body so naturally, ripely beautiful it has its own kind of truth.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    In Married Life, Ira Sachs aims a bit lower than Green but obliterates his target: The funny, the scary, the campy, the sad--they’re all splendidly of a piece.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Operation Filmmaker doesn't quite shake out as a microcosm of the American-Iraq relationship, although Davenport cheekily toys with the conceit. But the movie is endlessly resonant.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    I wish it were as much fun as its prospectus. The truth is that The Truth About Charlie gets increasingly tiresome.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Almost to a one, the people Guest casts are virtuosos, and he lets them hit notes they can't hit anywhere else.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Demme's movie exuberantly crosses the border from documentary into hagiography and from hagiography into celebration.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Full Frontal could not be more opaque. I honestly don't have a clue what it's about; it went completely over my head.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The film has no spirit of inquiry -- no spirit at all, really.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Gladiator's combination of grim sanctimony and drenching, Dolby-ized dismemberings left me appalled.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Anderson must have needed that bonkers third-hour climax because there was nowhere to go short of spontaneous combustion.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    A pungently funny and heartfelt piece of wish fulfillment.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Among the most enraging (documentaries) I've ever seen, and while it's fine and heartfelt and I commend it to those of you with strong constitutions, it is the film that has finally broken me.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 20 David Edelstein
    George Clooney is all by himself among living leading men in making smarm pass triumphantly for charm. But the movie lacks momentum, clarity, a decent payoff, and a location with the personality of Vegas.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Aeon Flux is not that terrible. It's certainly more fun than a lot of films that get lovingly showcased.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    As Willie Stark, Sean Penn demonstrates how a great Method actor can make the world’s most unconvincing rabble-rouser.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The Recruit is like vaudeville night at Bellevue.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 David Edelstein
    For grown-ups, the film will touch something deeper: the heartfelt wish that childhood memories will never fade.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    McKellen's actions are queerly unpredictable (pun intended), but every plot other twist is portentously foreshadowed.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    During the ghastly, surreal climax, I had fun closing one eye and with the other watching various ashen older men stumble toward the exit.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 David Edelstein
    By the climax, we can hardly breathe -- The outcome is less important than our utter and complete empathy with this man. As we await what he does, we breathe with him, in and out. This is an astonishing movie.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    The whole thing is irresistibly preposterous.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    I wasn't prepared for the slap-happy brilliance of Shrek 2, which should ideally be seen twice--once with kids, once savored at something like a midnight show.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    I think Levinson missed a chance to get something unique and audacious on screen.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    If Boiler Room isn't an especially challenging movie, it's still a damn good melodrama -- a boilermaker.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Weds an epic, sometimes visionary, depiction of the afterlife to a script and story with fewer psychological layers than the average Hallmark card.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    This is familiar terrain jazzed up by unfamiliar voices--principally Terrence Howard and his high-pitched, singsong drawl. You don't quite know what he's thinking; he might even be demented. But he keeps you watching and guessing.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Uneven, ludicrous, but--oh man!--fun to watch.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Evocative as it is, The Road comes up short, not because it’s bleak but because it’s monotonous.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    It isn’t a train wreck--a train wreck would be memorable. What’s wrong is wrong by design.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The visuals have so much intrinsic motion that it's too bad Robots is oppressively rollercoasterish.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Ulrich Mühe gives a marvelously self-contained performance. There isn't an ounce of fat on his body, or in his acting: He has pared himself down to a pair of eyes that prowl the faces of his character's countrymen for signs of arrogance--i.e., of independent thinking.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Bug
    Has the feverish compression of live theater and the moody expansiveness of film. The mix is insanely powerful.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It’s intermittently very funny. But it doesn’t make the existential leap to the big screen, and it doesn’t have the density of gags or the lunatic free-association of the best episodes.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Doubt is still overpowering; it took me a while when it was over to stop shaking. It's the dramatist’s business to sow doubt, to set down points of view that can't be reconciled, and Shanley makes visceral the notion that one can be right but never absolutely right, that doubt might be our last, best hope.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Burn After Reading is untranscendent, a little tired, the first Coen brothers picture on autopilot. In the words of the CIA superior, it’s "no biggie."
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie is a testament to compromise, and so are the Farrellys' other movies--between the freakish pain of living and the wonderfully dumb gross-out slapstick that said freakishness makes possible.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Hong Kong action fans hoping for spontaneous combustion from the American debut of superstar Chow Yun-Fat might want to turn their weapons on the producers.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Charming self-made vehicle.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    A warm, ingratiating, and fitfully hilarious epicurean road movie with a steady ache-an ache like a red-wine hangover.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    An honest tear-jerker.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    This is one of the most immediate, personal costume dramas ever made, and so it's not unseemly to consider how the writer-director and her heroine overlap.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 David Edelstein
    The best film of 2002.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The movie has grand (and Grand Guignol) bits and pieces, but despite the hype it’s no big deal. By horror standards, the premise isn’t especially outlandish.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Lake of Fire centers on abortion, but Kaye understands that while dead fetuses are the hook, the agenda covers the whole life cycle.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It has a gritty feel and a tight, methodical, one-thing-after-another tempo.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It's Miyazaki's use of sound--and silence--that takes your breath away
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    This one is alive with discoveries--of locations, characters, the actors who embody them, and even the medium. In The Go-Getter, filmmaking itself feels like Manifest Destiny.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    The movie is a political remake of "The Passion of the Christ," only more aestheticized: It's rigorous, evocative, and, in spite of its grisly imagery, elegant. It's a triumph--of masochistic literal-mindedness.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Good, sometimes thrilling, but it's less a war epic than an evocative romantic melodrama with a patchy first hour.

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