Deborah Young

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For 307 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Deborah Young's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Gangs of Wasseypur
Lowest review score: 30 Broken Sky
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 4 out of 307
307 movie reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Deborah Young
    The film succeeds at being both exciting and character-driven, but only after a confused first half that will leave international viewers frustrated over who’s who and what’s going on.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Deborah Young
    Lensed with great sensitivity and style and superbly acted, it has one drawback for Western audiences in its perplexing plot points based on the local culture and customs.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Deborah Young
    Though it’s a series that has seen its day, this swan song should attract genre die-hards with its elegant visuals and some humorously imaginative murders which are the director’s trademark.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Deborah Young
    Okada both wrote and directed Maquia, which showcases her ability to depict complex relationships and project delicate character arcs.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Deborah Young
    The film’s near-perfect calibration between family drama and black comedy recalls the director’s earlier features, Paris of the North and Either Way (remade in the U.S. as Prince Avalanche), but this is the one in which Sigurdsson really projects a distinctive voice.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Deborah Young
    This is clearly not a tell-all autobiography, but the story of a wildly successful career as seen through the protagonist's own eyes.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 Deborah Young
    This small film is a thoughtful addition to his parables about happy and unhappy families (Nobody Knows, After the Storm), studded with memorable characters and believable performances that quietly lead the viewer to reflect on societal values.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Deborah Young
    Slow and surprisingly talky, the three hours of the film do not exactly fly by, and the experience is similar to plunging into a long novel (the hero is a budding novelist) laced with philosophy, religion, politics and moral puzzles. The final sequences are worth the wait, though, bringing together the story’s many threads and offering the classic closure of a young man coming to terms with his identity.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Deborah Young
    Though it has far less outright violence than Gomorrah, whose oppressive criminal atmosphere it shares, Matteo Garrone's Dogman is just as intense a viewing experience, one that will have audiences gripping their armrests with its frighteningly real portrayal of a good man tempted by the devil.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Deborah Young
    The three main characters are all vividly sketched.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Deborah Young
    The film has a hard time shaking a feeling of filmed theater, particularly with the tight restriction of time and place. But the drama is brightly acted by a competent cast, of whom Jadidi and Izadyar, as the married couple, are the most acidic, while Abar and Alvand are given the most range.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Deborah Young
    The message tends to melt into a paint-by-numbers screenplay that pushes too many genre buttons to be thoroughly exciting.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Deborah Young
    Awkward performances and dialogue undercut interest in the characters so much that none of their raw, fleshy deaths matter a hoot, and by the time the rip-roaring triple ending rolls around, many viewers will have lost count of who’s still standing and who’s food for the birds.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Deborah Young
    Though the story is fictional, the imagery is grounded in a powerful documentary reality.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Deborah Young
    It shows the maverick filmmaker once again at the height of his expressive powers. Its stripped-down narrative and uncompromising repetitions will not be tolerable to everyone, but audiences willing to stick out the punishing but dazzling last half hour will walk away with a lot.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    Characters come and go quickly, leaving a feeling that there is too much compression of the multi-episode story.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    While its frank approach is refreshing, there is a sense of too much.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Deborah Young
    After watching Maysaloun Hamoud’s sparkling, taboo-breaking first feature In Between (Bar Bahar), audiences will have to seriously update their ideas about the lifestyle of Palestinian women in Israel.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Deborah Young
    Both Redford and Fonda are charming, delicate and convincing as Addie Moore and Louis Waters, the couple who find each other at the tail end of their lives. They are directed with sophistication and without a drop of melodrama or sentimentality by Ritesh Batra
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Deborah Young
    A road movie short on comedy and drama should at least offer a keen level of observation, but here insight is scarce and emotional resonance is faint.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Deborah Young
    Perhaps the most striking thing about David Gordon Green’s Stronger is how it refuses to turn its subject into a hero or even a small-time symbol of courage, as one might legitimately expect of a survivor story, even while the world is clamoring to put him on a pedestal.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Deborah Young
    Many rough edges are smoothed by the strong acting and well-done tech work.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Deborah Young
    Side-stepping what could have been a cheap, morbid peek into the lives of two beautiful teenagers who were born joined at the hip, Indivisible strikes out on its own path, sounding an exhilarating note of freedom for its protags.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Deborah Young
    Never talking down to his audience, he rather pulls them up to an intellectual level where other filmmakers fear to go.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Deborah Young
    Shot in 23 countries, the film has an amazing breadth and a relentless moral drive that will make it a reference point for this subject, whatever the audience response may be.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Deborah Young
    It’s hard not to leave the film shaken.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 70 Deborah Young
    There are multiple levels on which to enjoy Roman Polanski’s Based on a True Story (D’Apres une histoire vraie), none of them very deep or complicated. But together they raise the resonance of a masterfully made psychological thriller in the traditional mode.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Deborah Young
    The sheer purity of the imagery is entrancing and puts it among his finest, most uplifting works.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Deborah Young
    Even admitting that films like Cache (Hidden), The White Ribbon and Amour have raised the bar higher and higher, Happy End feels like it’s pulling its punches and not in their league. For one thing, it’s hard to pin down the theme of the piece.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Deborah Young
    Following the fizzle of his coming-of-ager Goodbye Berlin (Tschick) last year, Fatih Akin bounces back and bounces high with an edge-of-seat thriller inspired by xenophobic murders in Germany by a Neo-Nazi group.

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